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CHANGED CONDITIONS.

Another point which should not be overlooked is that within the last few years a great change has come about in the conditions, tone, and morale of the Army, a change which is not so generally recognised as 'it.should be. "He is a different man to what he used to be,'' says C4oneral Sir F L. Smithwho tool, over tho Southorr Command in 1912, alluding to the British soldier, for whom he has an in-ti-jisr- admiral ion. "He is sober, more intelligent, and bettor educated. He represents tho keenest type of man in the kingdom. He keens fit and well. Ycm have o T 'ily to let him know that he is on his honour and he will play up | to you." This chance has been mainly l hrouglit about by allowing no man to ■ enlist who cannot fir-t produce sntisfac-, tory evi-.io--.or> of _rood conduct. An applicant must nroduce a testimonial as to cliavictor .from some person of respectability or give the -""M of someone of position v. ho is'willing to vouch for him. -Furthermore, the physical conditio-i of tho army was never at such a high standard as it is to-day.' Tho n.edi"-il examination is very strict, and the thousands of splendid athletes turned on- hi - ' the army provides' n, remnrkab" l illustration of tho fine physical qualities of our soldiers. ~■'■

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140310.2.45.1

Bibliographic details

CHANGED CONDITIONS., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8814, 10 March 1914

Word Count
225

CHANGED CONDITIONS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8814, 10 March 1914

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