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THE WORLD TO-DAY.

"Guardian" Office, March 6, 1914. In an article on " Tho Moral Obligation to bo Intelligent," Professor John Erskinc, of Columbia University, shows that this phrase is by no means widely accepted, and goes on to show,

with much piquancy, that to bo intelli-

gont is one of the great commandments, and that intelligence is tho life indeed, the infinite order in which man finds himself, and it makes goodness articulate and virtue a fact. "Tho disposition to consider intelligence a

peril is an old Anglo-Saxon inherit-

ance," ho writes. "Splendid as- our ,literature is. it has not voiced all the aspirations of humanity, nor could it be expected. to voice an aspiration -that has jiot"characteristically belonged- -to

the English'race. The praise - of, intelligenc'3 is therefore not one of, „its 'characteristic glories. In Shakespeare's plays there were some highly intelligent men, fcut they are either villains ,or tragic-v ictim;,. In ' Paradise ' Lost '

Milton attributes intelligence of the

highest order to the devil...'ln Fielding o$ Swift. Thackeray or Dickons tho hero of tho English novel is a well-

meaning blunderer who in the last , chapter i.s temporarily rescued by tho Grace of God from the mess he has made of his life.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140306.2.52

Bibliographic details

THE WORLD TO-DAY., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8811, 6 March 1914

Word Count
203

THE WORLD TO-DAY. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8811, 6 March 1914

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