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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

■ • -. .raw;-:. '■■;-'■■■■'■ • .■' '; -:; t' ; ■ The following are the vital statistics for the Ashburton registration district for the month of February, 1914: — Births 27," deaths 7, marriages 4. The figures for ; February,. 1913, were: — Births 21, deaths 11^ marriages 3. fc ,i -.

Professor Fox, the Australian snake expert, gave' a demonstration 'at: the Calcutta Zoo of his snake-bite antidote. He was accidentally and died. His experiments;'on animals were eminently successful. ■-■'■■■■'■■'"..'■ v' 1.: .

At Johannesburg, a native miner was remanded' on a charge of attemiiting to murder a white miner. While the latter was asleep, the native placed a cartridge under the bed in the room. The explosion wrecked the room and the white man was injured. ■-'■

Some Timaru land seekers (says the "Herald ") who went to Marlborpugh last week to inspect the Hillersden Estate have returned very disappointed with the land, and have decided after seeing it not to apply for any of,the 43 blocks.

A Hokitika Press Association message states that the bodyaof .Patrick Quirk, a resident, of Waiuta, was found in the Hokitika 1 River this ' morning. Deceased has not been seen.for over a week, and it was thought he had gone bacji to Waiuta.:

The. weather to-day was . fine, but threatening, and the temperature warm. On Sunday morning early a light shower >vas experienced in, Ash 1 bur'toiV, and up .to 9 o'clock four points of rain ; was recorded at the Domain /Weather Station. -The shower> liow-cvor,-was. local, none falling near the f j?a coast.

At the meeting, of .the Ashburton Hospital and Charitable Aid Board this morning the District Health Officer reported a case of infantile paralysis at Methvcn —the first one notified in the Asilburton .County. It was decided to, draw :'the' "'attention "of Cdtinty 1 medicos to the ■ fact that the disease, had been ', gazetted as a notifiable one. '.■■"•,

A Dmiedm Press Association' messags reports that a: fire at Milton yesterday morning gutted a .shop occupied by Mr Hood, jeweller,, and o,wned by Combs Brothers. The entire stock,' valued at. £530, was destroyed. The insurances,are:—^Building, £150 in the South. British; stock, £175 in the South British,. and £125 in the Alliance. The'loss is over £200.

Whilst Miss Bowen and Mrs Bowen, wife of the Chief Magistrate.'of .Malayj were out driving .on Mr John Studholme's estate at Coldstream on Saturday the horse fell, pitching both ladies out on to the road. It is reported that Miss Bowen has an arm broken, and that Mrs Bowen sustained several scratches and bruises. Both are suffering from shock. The ladies were the guests of Mr and Mrs Studholme.

A meeting of the South liakaia Domain Board was held, to-day, the Hon. O. A. O. Hardy iii the cliair: All members but one were present. The annual balance-sheet was read and confirmed. It showed a fair balance in hand. Necessary repairs were arranged to he done. The usual permits in connection with the sports had been granted to all the applicants. The .cottage on the reserve in the township was re-insured, and the matter of tenants occupying same to be looked into.

There is no limit to the number of publichouses in France, arid no magistrate's license i& required to open one. For years; the question of limiting the number of vendors licensed to Bell spirits for consumption on the, premises j ; has been before Parliament. One more Bill, is now before, the .Chamber,- sent down from the Senate. It provides that the number ol' publichouses shall henceforth be limited to one per 200 j inhabitants, communes- of 600 inhabitants or less being,..however, allowed three publichouses,-,, Tested ... interests will not; be touched; 'but no ne^v, license will be given until the total; number of public houses falls to the; figure corresponding with that of the Bill. Vested interests, however, must be understood to apply only to the lifetime of the present licensee. If j the Chamber passes the Bill the total number of publichouses in France will, (by gradual extinction; fall to 180,000. In 1909 the author of the Bill, M. Siegfried,', says' that it, reached : 480,000 —that is to say, one"Tp^Fß2 inhabitants —whereas one * publichouse suffices for 246 inhabitants in the German Empire,, for 360 in'the United States, 480 in:, England,. 6000 in Sweden, and 9000 in. ; N6nVay;': ■ ""'' ■-'..■ -

All the rivers wore reported t0,.-be clear to-day.

During their stay in Ashburton today, Sir Joseph Ward. Mr G. Witty, M.P., and Mr Dennchy visited "the Ashburton Domain and the CountyHospital. They were greatly pleased with the,beauty of the Domain and impressed with the complete appointments at the hospital, its value as an institution for the sick, and its surroundings.

An Australian has worked out the death rate per mile in aviation. In 1898 one person was killed tp every. 1000 miles, in 1909 one in every 9200; miles, in 1910 one in every 20,700 miles, 1911 one in every 30,000, and in 1912 85,700 miles were covered to every death, so that it would appear that flying is yearly making great strides from the point of view of safety.

A rujjiiorrie Press Association'message state?; that Hugh Stanley <. McLean, Tepu Jiairere, and R6bert , Walker were committed .for trial at Tologa^Bay on a charge.of assaulting Robert Thorburn. The " evidence indicated that Thorbum. hud been stuck up on the road and robbed 6f £3, and a bottle of beer. . ■

"The United Labour Party has adopted a novel way for raising funds for general and municipal election expenses (says the "Dominion"). '-A "One Hundred Thousand Pence Fund " has been opened, and members have been entrusted with books of penny tickets. These will.' p;'be issued at the ■ rate of 10,000 a ; month, up till' the election,' and the proceeds arising from the sale of the tickets will be used'in putting forward Labour candidates a€ the elections. . ■''.'•'•■

„; A number of orchardists ;in the' NeU son district intend to follow ,tho; advice of Mr Cockayne, Government Biologist,' and plant pinus insignia with a view to ■■ using the timber for fruit cases. At the present time a couple of men who own a portable circular saw bench and an oil engine are making a living in the Motueka and Riwaka districts- by. cutting up poplu-s felled by local fruitgrowers,; who iind the timber makes excellent cases for sending the produce of their "orchards to the Wellington' market.

It is the intention of the Wellington Land Board when applications for transfers of sections held under improved farni regulations are made to require both /parties in each case to make a statutory declaration >is to the amount of money paid _by way of consideration. The Act stipulates that in such transactions no profit shall be made by the holders of the sections.

In connection with the coming Salvation Army Congress, a proposal has been put forward for a united gathering to be held in the Basin Reserve on Sunday, March 29. Tbe gathering would be a unique one in the annals oi the Army in New Zealand, and would be attended by some 500 officers and soldiers, as well as the Army bandr, from Wellington, Christchurch, Auckland, Dunedin, and other centres.

. The trouble with the Blackball miners was before Commissioner Halley on Friday and Saturday, and it is understood the agreement is satisfactory (says a Greymouth message). The Conciliation Council is now awaiting the decision of, the; company and the Miners' . Union in .order to have the .matter sent to the- ; Court for ratification. The State mines dispute will:.be taken. to-morroV. 1- 1- It in anticipated that inside, the course, of a week'or two the whole coal-mining industry will be fixed up, so far as labour "conditions are concerned, for a longer period than has been customary on the Coast for many years past. >

The Inspector-General of Hospitals (Dr Valintme) recently despatched a. circular letter to; all hospital boards, containing recommendations for im-, proving the salaries and conditions of nurses. Wellington Hospital was then shown to rank with the highest in. Australasia as regards payment of nurses (says the "Dominion"), but now* substantial increases have been decided on, as outlined; in the Inspecr tor-General's circular. By this decision of tthe Hospital- and Charitable Aid Board the maximum pay for the sisters i£ increased from £95 to £100, and the certified nurses from £50 to £65.

New Zealand gained population by immigration to the extent of 14,219 persons last year. The total number of immigrants was 44,588. These figures were exceeded in 1912 and also in 1908. The departures during the year numbered 30,369. According to returns furnished by immigration officers, 14,707 persons arrived, from the United Kingdom and,2643 persons departed therefor during^the year. From the Commonwealth of Australia the arrivals are returned, as numbering 26,764 persons and Hhe departures therefor .as 24,961 .persons. The arrivals from and departures to other countries were 3117 and 2700 persons respectively. Of the 44,588 persons who came to New Zealand last year, 5916, or 15.27 per cent, of the total, were children under 12 years of age, and of the 30,369 ' departures',' y the children: numbered 2663, or 6.77 /per cent! The bulk of the new arrivals got their first glimpse of the Dominion, at Wellington, where 25,182 landed last year, while 13,131 cam© .to Auckland, 5721 to Irivercargill, 520 to Dunedin and 34.t0 Lytteltoh. As for .their nationality,! 42,550-.: were: British 'and 2038: foreign,-including 385 Austrians, 232 Germans, .325 .Chinese and 520 Americans.

The appeal of an employer for a girl clerk with "no pretensions.: to good looks," and the statement of another employer that plain girls are better workers, has'inspired a city stockbroker to a vigorous defence of the pretty city girl • (says the London "Express"). "It is true." he writes, "that a reaction has ,set in in favour of the girl typist who lacks physical charms, and perhaps in a few cases the pretty girl may be disturbing and tracting, but sir© is also responsibly for the introduction\of the human element into city life, xfe city boasts, in my opinion, the prettiest" girls in the world. Even the theatre cannot compete with the city in this respect. It has been a constant source of ■ wonder 'to me why the city girls do not make brilliant matches like those engaged on the stage. The pretty girl has brightened up many a dull and prosaic office. Her ■cheerfulness—l deny that she possesses a temper or is inclined to sulk— j is an inspiration to her fellow-workers. I object strenuously to the statement of n.n employer that tho ragp of pretty girls began with the craze for luxurious offices. My experience is that intellect, goes with beauty'-and vivacity, and that the lack of these .qualities is more often thnn not a .sign of dulriess 1 and stupidity."

-A ease of infantile paralysis has occV"'ed at Kiwitea, in the Rangitikei district, the victim being a girl nine years of age

Thompson was charged at the Oliristchurch Magistrate's Court on Saturday (says a Press Association message) with the murder of Hannah Thompson,'and was remanded till Wednesday, the charge being reduced to manslaughter.

A movement, is on foot in Napier to build a Babies' Hospital in connection with the Plunket Society. Already £535 has .been sub-scribed. Mr E. W. Knowles don-xtsd a site worth £500, and also £200 to the building fund, ilr J. Vigor Brown, M.P., gave £100.

A Press message states that at the Napier swimming sports held in the municipal bsuhs on Saturday, Malcolm Champion lowered his 220 yards record by 1 1-5-sec, his actual *time being 2mm. 36 3-5 cc. In the 100 yards his time was 5S i-5 seconds, his previous best beng 60 seconds. •

during digging operations at; Dr Andrew's property at Stoke List week, a workman unearthed a curiosity in the shape of a copper stamp, which after boing cleaned was found to bear an inscription as follows: ."William Jenkins, papcrhanger, upholsterer, and painter. Hardy- Street, Nelson, 18-^." The two final figures denoting.the year were obll'^vxtiua. An old resident remembers a tradesman of the name, who wm. in li'isinoss in the 'sixties; so that it is evident that the, find must have remained buried for 1 a v»ry long time.'

When the boy farm labourers ■ were brought out to New Zealand by r. Ayrshire under the auspices of the Government complaint was made by a section of Labour that the contract wages (7s Gd a week/and found) were too small. Tho Hon. J. Allen .has received two letters from farmers eaeii of whom has one of the boys in hi employ. .One has found the youth si reliable that he has raised his wages to 18s a week. Tho other points out tha. lie has had to spend already over £• on clothing for the boy, and he reckons that, under the circumstances, he is paying for his services at the rate of 12s 6d a week.

A remarkable instance of attempted extortion on the part of an hotel-koeper at a Swiss resorl has been ventilated in court at "Geneva. A French girl who was slaying with her mother at the hotel fell from a- window and was killed. The mother decided to take the body to I'jiris for burial, and some days passed before the necessary arrangements for tho journey were completed. The fact that (here had been a fatal acoideti t at tho hotel, and that the dead body had not been removed, interfered to some extent with the business of the plfice, and when the lady was ready to ivuve she ■was presented with a'bill for £520 by the landlord. She offered 1 to pay £20, but as this was refused, the tho case vra,s eventually taken into court, and ihe judge, in awarding the liotolkeeper £10 without costs, declared that the £520 bill was*"a veritable attempt at exploitation."

We have frequently heard- of a bull in a China shop (says the " Winton Record""), but when a weasel takes charge of a drapery establishment the occurrence must be considered odd and rare. Such, however, was the case "the other day, when a weasel, of abnormal .size, gained rm eutranco into Mr Ernie Rninos's business premises. A lady was looking over some seasonable garments whei> she beheld the creature. She screamed, gathered up her skirt, and fled for doar life. The inquisitive weasel wandered round to where the female assistants were engaged. They, too; struck top "C",and leapt with striking agility on to the counters. Meanwhile Air. Raines and another with broomsticks pursued the weasel, it got out, and was last seen through the long grass in the vicinity of tho past office.

Writing on the change in the London money market, the financial editor of the. Sydney "Daily Telegraph" says:—"lf you ask where ail this plethora of cheap money . has come from, it is difficult to say. Gold has only entered the country to a small extent. However, it is not a question of gold, but of credit, and the borrowers and underwriters and Stock Exchange speculators can get what they require, and they regard Stock Exchange prices as exceptionally low. So they were. But the presnt advance 1, if carried much, further, will soon/alter that position of affairs, and the rush of new loans\will tend in the same direction. Really, London appears to be going too fast. The great reason for the rally 'is that the holders of money have become reassured. During the . first half of •, the year money bows-to London, and there is an adequate 'Supply now. ' So there is a rush to lend at lower rates, and London is counting on cheap money at any rate until July. It is to be hoped that their anticipations \vill be fulfilled, br that it would be fairly easy to draw too heavily on the floating supplies of capitalin London just now is probably a sound conclusion. Sudden transjjorm.ations like this are not seldom unreliable. However, there is no doubt about the -gamble going on in London at this juncture." ,<

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140302.2.17

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8807, 2 March 1914

Word Count
2,654

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8807, 2 March 1914

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