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A MAN OF SENTIMENT.

Like his countrymen, Mr Roosevelt is a man of sentiment. You can understand, something of his character when you read his tribute to his parents. Of his father he says, "He was, the best man I', ever knew." He recalls his marriage at St. Oeorge's, Hanover Square, when Sir Cecil Spring-Rice, the present British Ambassador at Washington, was t his best man, and says, "1 ieel as if 1 were living in one of Thackeray s novels." He"' defends his crusade against the trusts, against " grait' and other evils, and his successful efforts to reform the administration of internal affairs. He also thinks, h necessary to reply to his enemies on the subject of his candidature for a third term of office as President. "The third term 'tradition has no value whatever except a& it applies to a third consecutive term. . . . J> would be a mark both of weakness and unwisdom for the American people to embody it into a constitutional provision which could nob do them good, and on some occasion might work real harm. It would be a benighted .policy .to disqualify absolutely from tho highest office a man who while holding 1 had actually shown the 'highest capacity to exorcise its powers with the utmost effect for the public deience.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140226.2.55.4

Bibliographic details

A MAN OF SENTIMENT., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8803, 26 February 1914

Word Count
217

A MAN OF SENTIMENT. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8803, 26 February 1914

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