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LOCAL AND GENEKAL.

A cable from London reports . that the " Times " is reducing its price to one penny. ,

The Hinds correspondent of the " Guardian " writes —" The harvest on the light land is now finished, and a good deal has been threshed with satisfactory results. On the heavier land near the river stacking is still in progress, but is drawing to a close.'.'

" New Zealand produces the best lamb and mutton sent to London; in fact, in the world," "'said Mr Estell, commercial superintendent for the Port of London Authority, in his address to the Wellington Chamber of Commerce on' Wednesday.

The second express from the south yesterday was about' half an hour behind schedule time'when it pulled into the Christchurch station. The delay was due to the West Coast train being behind t(ime and that delay, again, was due to a lengthy wait for the Ashburton evening train to pass. The passenger traffic yesterday was heavy.

A. -swarm of bees recently took up its abode under a horse feeder that was in use on a farm here (writes the Wendon correspondent of the Mataura "Ensign"); At dinner-time, when half-a-dozen horses were eating l'ound the feeder, ; th,e bees continued busily with their'/ work,' flying ■in and out among the 'horse's' legs, but never, attempting tousting 1 the animals. The horses were&at first rather alarmed, probably taking the' little workers; for a horde, of bot-flies,, ;biyt on finding themselves "uhmo'le'sted ihey became quite quiet. ' ' J :;

At a meet|ng of . the Christchurch Hospital Board to-day, Dr. Fen wick moved .that syphilis., .be, treated in. the but-patienfe' ward:'' He said it was no use denying the fact that the disease was prevalent and increasing m Christchiirch. Sufferers usually went to chemists, who were not able to treat the cases properly, but if the hospital was open to cases, they could be treated early, and cures effected. The matter was referred to the hoopital committee. > ■

An eclipse of the sun took place to-day. The weather in Ashburton was cloudy, and the -view obtainable was not-so clear as could have been wished, though the sun was visible at times. In Ashburton the view of the eclipse commenced at 10.43 a.m., and ended at 11.26 a.m., the greatest,phase taking place at 11.5. It was only a partial eclipse,, the greatest phase obscuring only „022 of the sun's diameter. Seen from Ashburton, it appeared as if ■^he moon grazed the sun a, little to the highest point of its disc, causing a distinct flattering of the circular outline.

An inkling of the effect of the local government legislation to be introduced by the Government next session was given by the Minister of Internal' Affairs (the Hon. FJ.' H. D. Bell) in' replying to a Wellington deputation yesterday. He said he hoped to submit'to the local authorities before next session, and to Parliament during next session, a Bill dealing with the powers of local authorities. The Government thought it wiser to give wider powers to local authorities than to ..try to amalgamate, them,;, for 'many 'of: .the local authorities, objected tot being nmalgomated.; "-/But." he added,'" if I .continue.;,to hold office very liluch lot'jipv, I, reepgnise that the day of battle between, the local authorities and myself will'come."

A number,- of the Roman Catholic archbishops and,bishops of Australasia will, it is announced, visit Rome next year for the purpose of joining in the ceremonies in connection with the beatification' of'fthe Venerable Oliver Plunket, a; former Archbishop of Armagh, in the North of Ireland, who, in the year 1681, during the reign or King Charles 11., was put to death for alleged high treason. Archbishop Plunke't, according to historic records, was born in 1629, and was raised to the episcopacy in 1669. The present Earl of Fingal is a member of 'the illustrious Plunket family, which was represented in Australia for many years by the-Hon. and. Rev. Father Plunket, of the Redemptorist Order, on© of the founders of Ballarat Monastery, and subsequently attached to the monastery at Waratah, New South Wales. The ceremonies in connection with the beatification of. Venerable Oliver Plunket, who is regarded by the Church as a .martyr, will Ke attended by archbishops and bishops, from all parts of the world. , :'f

Friday, February 13, was the anniversary of one of the most tragic deeds in the Maori wars—the lnassacre of eight white people at White Cliffs, in Taranaki. On' February. 13, 1869 (says the Auckland "Star"), the Rev.' J. Whiteley, a Wesleyan missionary of. 40 years' standing, was, riding to visit a block-house atythe White Cliffs, where Lieutenant , Gascoigne , and his family lived. Early that-; day a band .; of Maoris suddenly" appeared at the outpost and slaughtered all its inmates, Gascoigne, his wife, and three children, and two other Englishmen. When the missionary^ who had in the previous, war gone among, ( the Natives with impunity, approached the scene, quite: unaware .of ..the tragedy,, he was challenged by the fMaori.l He rode on, and a volley was: fired which killed his horse. Mr, Whiteley.! was seen to kneel in prayer. Another volley was fired, and he fell dead. The tidings of the massacre spread apace, and Taranaki, fearing a general Maori rising, was tor some time in a state of .great alarm.

Women are not going to be deterred from following the now calling, or indulging in aviation as a sport, despite 'he" over-increasing list nf fatalities among aviators. At the English Hall school there are several woman students, who will sow secure their bi'evH,s.*_ Miss Trohawko Davies. who has i' FC,Uf^iirorl the coveted distinction 'of boiiig iho first woman to loop the loop, owns her own machine, n. Bleriot, bat does not pilot it, evidently ' rot through lack of courage, for, nfter her thrilling experience in the oil', she returned to earth unmoved by excitement, and told her friends tliat she was rather glad when the machine was upside.down, because in the ordinary way it was rather uncomfortable. Another :ntrepid woman aviator. Mme. de Laroehe, lias- been; iwnrdnd a prize by the French Aero Club for p. flight of aßout 202 miles, wliich is the longest distance to date covered by a. woman aviator. Even the uninitiated seem to have contracted the ferial fever, and to fly, is the craze of the moment. The modern wommi certainly" seems pvonared to n.iy ?nv price to .satisfy her appetite for excitement.

At the Magistrate's Court this morning, before Mr R- < Galbraitli, J.P., a first offender was fined 5s for drunkenness, in default 24 hours' imprisonment.

At the meeting of the Wellington Hospital and Charitable _ Aid Board a letter was read from Mr S. I. MacDonell, of Papua, offering to supply an indefinite number of human skulls, "which mostly come from the west, where the natives procure them. The Board declined theffcffer with thanks.

Nearly 6000 sheep were landed m Lyttelton on Thursday from the North Island. The Union Company s steamer Wanaka arrived during the morning with 3000 from Napier artd in the afternoon the Pukaki brought' 2000 : from Petone. The Petone also arrived during the morning with a large freight. During the next week or two several large consignments are expected, including two from Chatham Island.

A Hastings Press Association message states'that at a banquet last night the Premier stated that Mr J. G. Wilson, of Rangitikei, had been asked to accept the Presidency of the new Board of Agriculture. ■■' A gentleman in the South Island would bo offered the vice-presidency, and two, other appointments were to be made. The experiment of providing farms for labourers who paid a deposit of £25 had been a great success:

Mr J. Davison, of Newlarids/had the misfortune to lose about 250' bushels of Algerian oats by fire on Saturday. A heap of bagged stuff was lying in, a paddock, and inutile afternoon a neighbour, Mr C. W. Wood, noticed the heap on fire. , He, with some others, •at one'e made, for the.scene, post-has.to and commenced to pull out the burning, bags, fortunately saving about 600 1 bushels of the'Bso bushels stacked. Mr Davison was, in Ashburton when the fir 3 'occurred.

Arrangeinetits have ' been completed for the rifle championship meeting, which commences at Trentham to-nior-tow, .and will conclude with the firingoff for the King's belt on the Thural iy afternoon following. The number of entries is larger than for the past two or three years, but not as large as it was four or five years ago, when it reached over 600. The number of competitors this year probably will reach 350, including most of the crack shots, who have never missed a meeting for years.

,A safety razor, connected to a motor by means of a flexible shaft, is the latest invention to simplify shaving (says the "Electrical World")'. The blades are actuated in such a way as to cut the heard'by impact or blows. The blades, therefore, do not need to be so sharp as in hand-shaving. No isoap ,is necessary, wetting ; the skin being sufficient, and a ( clean shave can be accomplished, it is declared, in a very shorty time. The after effects are described as being those following a mild massage. A, plug is provided' for attaching the razor to a lamp socket.

. An. interesting, report dealing with the Salvation Army's connection with the silk industry in India has recently been published. S,alvation Army schools are in operation in various .parts of the territory. , At 11 •', centres the rearing of silk worms is being carried on, silk reeling at 15, and silk weaving is •in progress at Ludheana, Moradabad, and jfeangalore. Under the supervision -of tli&'; staff there have been trained .several hundred reelers, spinners, weavers, and silk-worm growers, who form a' compact force, under able leadership and make future progress -both possible and sure.

Th/e carpenters .and joiners of New South Wales have obtained a country award, which provides that the, minimum rate for carpenters and joiners is to be Is 6d per 'hour, except in the North Ctfast district, where the rate shall Be Is 5d per hour. Leading bands are to be paid l£d per hour extra. For insulation work l£d per hour extra is to be paid, with 3d per hour extra 'if the^insulation is silicate. Overtime is to be paid for at the rate of tima and a quarter for tho first two hours, time and a half till midnight, and double time after. Apprentices are to receive 10s, 15s, 20s, 255, and 32s 6d.

A Christchurch Press Association telegram states that Lionel Walter Doreen, who pleaded guilty to making a false declaration as to his name and age beiore 'the .Registrar of Marriages, was brought before Judge Denniston for sentence. The prosecution stated that Doreen was found wandering in the streets of Wellington in 1903, at the age of_ seven, and was committed to an institution, where ho remained till he absconded from Burnham in 1913. Apart from absconding, his conduct had boon good.' Ho' married under a false name. His Honour said that Doreen was unfortunate in starting life by absconding from Burnham, but he showed no natural depravity, and was ordered to come up for .sentence :' when called., i '•" fi

| /Undoubtedly the seabirds which are always to .be seen at the mouth of the Ashburton River add to the picturesqubness of that pleasure resort, and'make it more attractive. It .is common, knowledge that gulls are-pro-tected, yet some shooters, if they know that the ranger is out of < sight, are not beyond "taking'a shot at the gulls. The other day one was noticed having a shot at birds on the wing at.^ythe river mouth by an Ashburton resident, and, on being remonstrated with, replied that he was not shooting at gulls but at terns. He appeared surprised when informed that the tern is more heavily protected than the i gull, and that the fine prescribed for shooting terns is greater than for, gulls. However, that the ranger keeps a strict guard over his feathered charges is illustrated by the fearlessness with which they regard humsm beings, and there is very little opportunity for shooting at protect ed birds at the place mentioned. In this, the ranger has the hearty co-operation of s the majority of people who visit the river mouth.

Road Conditions in Russia.—As* everyone knows who has travelled through Russia, the roads in that country are often knee deep in soft slush, which make motoring almost im- i possible. At the recent military manoeuvres, the majority of heavy cars which were competing were unable to complete the route set out. The Ford j ■touring car and delivery van which j were entered, both gave, such an excellent account of 'themselves that the Government decided to order a large number of Fords for military transport. Another shipment of Famous Fords is arriving in Ashburton about the 28th of this . month. These are .nearly-all sold. Catalogues free from G. H. Car&on, Tancred Street. 145

A farmer from the Papanui district told a "Guardian" reporter that the present season around Papanui was the best experienced for the past decade, from an agriculturist's point of view.

Prior to his sermon at St. Josephs Church, Ohakune, last Sunday, Rev. Father Maillard announced that, after a full inspection of the town, and its surroundings, the sisters had decided to open a convent in Ohakune'next February, after the Christmas holidays.

Mr J. Cairns, of Wakanui, has finished threshing 1, and haS;Secured some very good yieMk: A 60-acre" paddock of. Velvet wheat yielded as high as 52 bushels to the acre, but the average wheat yield of all that threshed by Mr Cairns this year was about 33 bushels. He also obtained a yield of 75 bushels to the acre from a fairly large paddock of Garten oats.

Mr Buckley, Corporation Engineer of Dublin, in evidence before the Local Government Board at Dublin last month, said there were 600 dangerous houses in Dublin* that he knew of. There were 14,600 families not properly housed in Dublin. He reckoned that 15.000 houses were required to properly house tho people. John Hemingway, builder, said he could put up cottages to rent at 6s a week, which could become the worker's own after 15 years. He strongly condemned the tenement house, advocating putting the people in the suburbs. The drink question was the question of tKe,,hour in Dublin, as money went in drink that ought to go in house rent.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140225.2.14

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENEKAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8803, 25 February 1914

Word Count
2,402

LOCAL AND GENEKAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8803, 25 February 1914

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