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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

At the Wellington Magistrate's Court yesterday, Edward Rossiter Reddick •.vas 'iiaed' £20 for "sly grog-selling in the neighbourhood of Taranaki Street. Daniel O'Brieu, who was convicted of a similar offence, was fined £10.

The tomato crop throughout Ashburtoa County is much later than usual this season, and much of the fruit locally- grown will not have time to ijpoii before the cold weather sets in. The lateness of the crop accounts for the high prices that have ruled up to date. 'W. ..-•■•

though the .übiquitous sparrows are the greatest feathered enemy that the graingrower knows, they are evidently not .averse to n change of diet, for they often invade local butchers' shops and may be seen helping themselves to pieces of Jat or meat, regardless of the proximity of human beings.

A Christchurch Press Association telegram states that Anthony Watson T?.S «i«iSil £25 and costs at the Magistrate's Court to-day on a charge of accepting small bets on_ the liiccarton' racecourse. Watson claimed ho was si fish-hawker, but his counsel admitted he had taken silver bets. James Dullah, on a similar charge, was also fined £25. Four weeks were allowed ';o find the money.

Three passengers by the slow trail? for Ashburton last evening were very much the worse for liquor. En route a disturbance arose, and on the arrival of the train they were taken charge of by the police and conveyed to the lockup in a taxi-cab. To-day two of them will be charged with drunkenness and the third with drunkenness and witi breaking, a window in a railway carriage.

The butchers at the Fairfield Freezing Works . . are -not working full time at present owing to a scarcity of lambs, the majority of which are not' yet ready, for. killing. It is expected, however, that in three weeks' time all hands will be going ,at top speed to cope with the supply. The. animals killed so far, are of prime quality, and good average weights, and the reputation of Canterbury lambs should not suffer by the output for 1914. - - - ■ ■ ' ■ ..

: .. "We have been' looking forward to this event for 50 years," said Mr M. Crisp (who has not so many years to ['his credit) in his speech at the turning of the first sod of the. Waiuku railway on Thursday. "Wellj if I have not been looking forward to it so long myself, I am a descendant of those who go as far back as that,'' was his reply to an outburst of laughter. '' My grandfather," he said, "and afterwards my father, presided at meetings in connection with the Waiuku railway, and now they have pushed me into it." Major Luck, provincial president of the Farmers' Union, in his speech, also touched upon the time that had elapsed since this railway was first mooted. "It is just 46 years," he said, " since I first went over the proposed route of this line." They, would have had the railway long' ago, he said, but for a little difference of opinion regarding the route. This, lie added, should be a lesson to other districts. ,

Mr Baxter Buckley, the well-know;! New Zealand musician, has had published a sleep song entitled " Slow Sinks the Sun."

The death is announced, in Sydney, of Mr Septimus Daly, aged 71. Deceased was a member of the Sydney Stock Exchange, and resided in New Zealand in the early '60s.

The Hon. Dr. Pomare, speaking at Waihi, defined a "wowser" as follows:—"A man who wears out the knees of his trousers on Sunday by praying, and the seat of his pants out by backsliding during the six days of the week."

A Dunedin Press Association message states that the Hon. R. H. Rhodes has advised Mr T. K. Sidey that he approved some time ago of infantile paralysis ■ being made a notifiable disease. The necessary notice was now ready for publication iii this week's " Gazette."

A Marlborough industry which is in the making, and one which may assume fair proportions in the future,, is that of curing Angora and other goat skins. These skins are very much sought after, and Mr O. S. Tapp, who makes a specialty of their curing, states that there is an ever-increasing demand for them throughout the whole of the Dominion, and at present he is quite tillable to keep pace with the demand.

An important conference affecting -the furniture trade is to be held in Christchurch at Easter. Delegates from the New Zealand Furniture Trade Employees' Federation and the Federated Furnishing Trade; Society of Australasia, will bej present, and the question of federation between Australia: and New Zealand will be discussed. Another question will be the establishment of a Federal Trade Journal to protect the interest of the furniture trade workers throughout the whole of Australasia. ;

Fish retailers interviewed in Christchurch to-day stated that the market was controlled and prices kept high by the use of. freezing plant. They rileged that fish passed in on Saturday were frozen and sold on Monday, though the by-laws prohibit the auctioning of frozen fish. One retailer stated he was going to move members of Parliament to place a high export duty on smoked blue cod, to prevent, the local market being drained as at present.

" Many concert artists have their eyes on this part of the world," said Mdlle. Antonia Dolores, in the course of a conversation at Wellington. "And why not? For its population, there is no country in ihe world like New Zealand. There are so many places >to visit, the people are all music-loving, ii not actually musical; every, place is so interesting. Then there have been sc many reports of artists making h

money out here, too. That is a bit' consideration, and one, I think, that will mean that many fine artists wib visit Australia and New Zealand in the. near future,"

. A strange and. welcome addition to tbe water fowl in the Ashburton Domain is a penguin, supposed to be "of the King variety. The bird, which is a -large, one, is at present moulting. It was captured by Mr H. P. Arnst at the mouth of the Rangitata River, and he yesterday presented itoto the Curator of the Domain as an addition to the bird life there. Though moulting, the bird looks lively and healthy, but, as a rule, they do not live long in isolation. This is the second time within the past few years that the Ashburton Domain has boasted a penguin, the other one dying after inhabiting the gardens for a few weeks. It appeared to sulk, and refused to take its food. ,

The method of exhibiting at the Panama Exhibition, which opens ■ in February, 1915, will be different from that at previous international exhibitions, inasmuch as exhibits from- particular countries will not be housed iii separate courts, but. will be exhibited side by side with articles of a similar nature from all countries. This information was contained in a letter from the Prime Minister to the president of the Otago Agricultural and Pastoral Society, and read at a meeting yesterday (says the "Otago Daily Times " of Thursday),

The North Island farmers ai'o coining money: "You can sell anything with wool or hair on it this year," said one of them at the Feilding saleyards on Friday. To support his statement he mentioned an «incident which took place at the Waituna sale earlier in the week. While a pen of sheep was being offered, one prospective buyer-, who was approaching the yards, got in a threepenny bid while still 100 yards away, before he had seen the sheep at all. " Any farmer who is not making money just now ought to give his farm away rather than try to work it. There is. not a single fly in the ointment, except that a very small portion 5f the oat cropvwas spoilt by the last rains. There is plenty of grass, and look at the price of- fat lambs!" '

. Fabulous prices have been offered' for black fox furs, so the London correspondent,.of. the Wellington " Post " reported recently.' In Wellington at present is a gentleman interested in the fur trade, and in conversation with a reporter he gave some particulars of the prices asked. Black foxes are a very rare species and the furs are consequently very valuable. Anything from £100 to £200 is a reasonable sum for a pelt, and as much,as £800 has been .given on the London market for a perfect specimen. The small Canadian province of Prince Edward Island is the only part of the world where- these foxes are bred. Recently the Russian Government sent a representative to the Island to endeavour to buy five pairs of foxes for breeding purposes. He offered So. dollars (£1600) for a pair, but the ranch owner asked £2000. The representative communicated with his principals, and was told to accept the offer, but in the meantime the fox-breeder had changed his mind and refused to sell. The foxes were required for breeding purposes in order that a supply of furs might be obtained for the Russian Royal family. As each, pair of animals can be, relied on to' produce from eight to 12 young foxes in a year, the bargain would have' been a good one. Four pelts are required for a set of fUrs, and the difference in cost if the manufacturer has his own breeding animals can be seen to( be very considerable.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140224.2.17

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8802, 24 February 1914

Word Count
1,572

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8802, 24 February 1914

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