Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LOCAL AND GENERAL.

Owing to a typographical error, in our report of the Magistrate's Court on Friday last, the name of James Wilkie appeared as a defendant in place of that James Henry Miller.

Blight has made its appearance in some of the potato crops in the Hampstead district, and some, areas of the tubers have been completely spoiled by the disease.

A cable states that Khasi outlaws crept up to an artillery camp on the Indian North-West frontier and stripped a bungalow, after gagging an officer and his wife, the > sole occupants.

A Press Association message from Auckland says that extensive swamp fires are raging in the upper portions of the Hauraki Plains. Several bush fires are burning on the hills at the back of Paeroa.

A Wairoa (Hawke's Bay) telegram states that Heremea To- Popo, aged 80, a leading. Native, who participated in several engagements against Te Kooti, was found dead in his bed at Frasertown.

At the Magistrate's Court this morning, before Mr G. W. Andrews, J.P., James T&ld, 'alias Thompson (commonly; known as "Scotty" Thompson), was-charged-with drunkenness and with breach of. a prohibition order. At the request of Sergeant Emerson, the hearing of the v charges was adjourned to Friday'to permit of the Magistrate, dealing with them.

It was reported tc jfche Ashbui;ton police on Sunday that an old-age pensioner, had disappeared from Trevorton'. From inquiries . the police discovered .that the man had been seen on the Ashburton ' Railway Station, and it is presumed that he has merely gone for a trip. Further search is being made.

The police of Paris have arrested four, and the Brussels police three men, in connection with the supposed theft of pictures from the British Museum. T.t is suspected that' the members of the gang are conducting an organised business of receiving stolen pictures in several European countries. The' British 1 Museum authorities deny the alleged robbery;

It is maliy a year ago since the last map*of "the:Hampstead Town District was prepared, and since that time chat locality lias gone ahead considerably, and much property that was then vacant lias since been built upon. From the must recent map, which waa published in 1883, . a stranger would gain only a poor,idea of Hampstead in its present -state.'.

' Many County farmers this .season are taking the precaution of insuring stacks, their action being induced by the present hot- spell. It is stated that, many stacks were erected when the sheaves were rather damp,'.and ,if this is the case farmers will regret the haste, although in view of the uncertain state of the weather whichl was experienced about three weeks ago, the risk seems justifiable.

On Saturday, in perfect weather, the North Canterbury Public Schools' Amateur Athletic Association held its 14th annual sports meeting. Unfavourable weather made it necessary to postpone the meeting on the date originally chosen, November 29, but a postponement did not detract from the success of Saturday's gathering. L. Lewis, .who ran third in the 100 yards race for boys under 14, in which there were 43 entrants, was the only Ashburton representative to score a

success

Speaking at the Grand Theatre last night, at the service held in connection with the Central Methodist Mission, Mr L. M. Isitt, M.P., said ; that recently a lady had told him that if she had her way all boys when they were about 16 years of age would be compelled to do housework for at legist a week. Asked for her reasons, the lady said :—" It would make them understand much that they now take for granted—those little but important duties that their mothers and sisters do every day." There was something in the idea, the speaker said, for when people knew the difficulties that others faced daily it .made them more sympathetic, more willing to give a helping hand.

A resident of; Hampstead, in 'conversation with a '"Guardian" reporter, stated that he strongly favoured the channelling of all streets in Hampstead Town District. He estimated that it. would cost about £5000 or £6000 to do the work, for which it would be necessary to raise a loan at, say, 5 per'• cent. ■ interest. There are some 600 ratepayer-is in' Hampstead Town District, and he. considered that they should be able to have the convenience of channelling and good drainage at an average.cost of 10s per annum per householder. At this price, channelling, he considers, would be a great boon to the residents, for at present they have .to get rid of refuse by means of digging pits, which entails considerable work, and has' the disadvantage of not being nearly so healthy as a drainage system. He remarked that the absence of a drainago system in Hampstead kept the price of property down, as numbers of •people-'.who .would like to reside there would not do !so when ,they learned that thero was no such system.

Road Conditions mv Russia.—As everyone knows who has travelled through Russia, the roads in that country are often knee deep in softslush, which.make motoring almost impossible. At the recent military manoeuvres, the majority of heavy cars which were competing were unable to complete the route set out. The Ford touring car and. delivery van which were entered, both gave such an excellent account of themselves that the Government decided to order a large number of Fords for military transport. Another shipment of Famous Fords is arriving in Ashburton about the 28th of this" month. These are nearly all sold. Catalogues free from "G. H. Carg&a, Tancred Street. 1 45

Ashburton flower gardens are remarkable just now Vfor the very nne asters to be seen in them. Some of the specimens are of- most beatuilul shades, and well worth inspection.

A- Wellington Press Association telegram states that the Wellington Hospital Board has received an anonymous donation of £250, half to go towards the establishment of a convalescent fund ' and the balance to the Victoria Home for Incurables.

As a residential quarter, Allenton does not dwindle iv public favour, and if figures weie only available, it would undoubtedly be seen that more houses go tip in this particular wing of Ashburton than, in any other. At the present time, several new residences are in course of erection, and Allenton is thus growing every day, as it were..

The new store and offices which arej being erected by Messrs Lane, Walker and Rudkin (the Ashburton Woollen Mills) are-nearing completion,- and in the course of a fortnight or so should be ready for occupation. The size of the new building is "90 feet by 40 feet, and it has been necessitated by the large increase in the firm's business. The woollen mills at the present time are expeedingly busy, and orders are pouring in from all over the Dominion. There "will be enough work, to keep a large staff of employees busy for some months to come.

According to..the.statements made at the monthly meeting of the Stratford County Council (says a correspondent), the spread of snoxious weeds was causing considerable alarm. Ragwort, blackberry, and Calif drnian thistle^ were making great headway, and the opinion was expressed that there would be no satisfaction until the inspection of noxious weeds was in ' th«flhands of county councils. It' was unanimously resolved 1 that the Government's., attention be drawn to the alarming spread of ntaxious; weeds in the Stratford county, and that unless more effective means were, taken to eradicate- tho^e pests the result would mean ruin to many settlers. ,

Many residents of Allenton report that the season has not. been-too good a one for fruit, and the reason given for the poor'crops is that the land in certain parts of the suburb lias a clay bottom, which tends to promote late frostg. The *trees are then affected in the early part of the season's growth and they do not recover. The Allenton district suffers, too, from-.' the violent nor'-westers, , which strikes some quarters unchecked, and causes a good deal of dafl^-ge to the trees. The present s^Sbn has not been so bad in that way as many previous ones. When the above-mentioned facts were related to another resident of Allenton, he stated that he knew of several who had Had a successful sonson with their fruit trees, especially with regard :to plums and pears.

Hospital Saturday collection took place at Dunedin on Saturday under beautiful weather conditions, states a Press Association, telegram. The collection was originally intended to be held last November but the strike up» set arrangettienTflV •.__ The town bore quite an animated appea'i'a-hce'Tag the lady collectors flitted hither and thither m the attempt to gather in every coin, so that the 1912 total of £944 might be exceeded. Some of the lady collectors were at' their posts &t 6.30 in the morning arid 1 it was "after 9 o'clock at night before work ceased. The sum of £190 was in hand on Saturday morning and a further sum of £450 was paid into the bank on Saturday night. With amounts advised by telephone and an estimate of dona-, tions to come in from country districts it is confidently anticipated that the collection will reach i£Bso.

The fruit trade between New Zealand and South America is an increasingly important one (says the "New Zealand Times"), and for the present season contracts have been signed by growers at Nelson, Motueka, Central Otago, Port Albert, Christchurch, and Hawke's Bay. The Government officials will commence the inspection of the first shipment of apples for South America this year at Nelson, this shipment being due to leave Wellington on the 26th inst. The export of apples from New Zealand last year was 23,000 cases, most of which went to the^ destinations above named; the consignments, this season will be just, about double that amount. The apple crops at Motueka have been affected in quantity by the recent heavy storm, but the quality remains good. In the case of ' growers who escaped the storm, splendid crops are recorded. The indications are that the fruit export will grow to considerable!, dimensions within the next year or two.

At the last Diocesan Synod (a Press Association message from Nelson states) Bishop Sadlier initiated a project to enable ministrations of religion. to be carried to. the settlers in the Sounds and back-blocks by means of a launch and van, to be named "Selwyn" and "Samuel Marsden" respectively, each of which would be equipped for celebrations of holy communion and church purposes generally, and furnish the quarters of the clergymen in charge. 'Fuiid^-are being raised, towards therealisation of; the project, which has, ! through the generosity of Miss Marsden, who has contributed very large sums towards diocesan objects, been substantially advanced. Miss' Marsden has expressed to Bishop Sadlier a desire to defray the whole cost of the Marsden van, and this will enable Bishop Sadlier to apply all the funds in hand to the Selwyn launch. .

It is stated that Professor David Starr Jordan, M.Sc, M.D., Rector of the Leland-Stanford University, California, is to visit .Australia early in March, and will remain for some weeks. He will be primarily concerned with the affairs of his liniversrtvj but he will give addresses on various subjects. Dr. Jordan is a director of the World's Peace Foundation, which was organised in July, 1910. He has delivered many lectures in Hawaii, America, and the Far East, and during his present tour is taking the opportunity of giving a cries of lecures in England, Scotland, France, Belgium and Germany. Dr. Jordan has written copiously on various subjects—Eugenics, Peace, etc.— and his book, "The Human Harvest" and a collection of essays entitled "War and Waste," have attracted con-; siderable attention in literary circles. Dr. Jordan went to the Far East with the object of studying the Eastern question at first hand. He visited New* Zealand in 1907 (says the "New' Zealand Herald" 1) and "delivered some interesting addresses throughout the Dominion upon university methods.

A Wellington Press Association telegram reports that a prolonged, and fairly sharp earthquake shock was experienced at 2.2 a.mT to-day.

A cable from Paris reports that the Hon. A. Balfour is at Cannes, playing tennis with the young champion, Tommy Burke.

-. A j "meeting of ' Lyttelton wharf labourers was called, for to-day, on a petition signed by 100 union members, to discuss the question of preference, complaint •-having been made of the work/ being distributed unfairly. The meeting was postponed owing' to the busy condition of the wharves.

A cyclist who "was riding along Dee i Street, lnvercargill, recently, was surprised to observe a shower of -bank' notes blowing about (says the "Southland News.") Quickly dismounting, and assisted: by others who had come on the scene, he commenced gathering them up, and while doing so an excited individual on a. motor bicycle came up and explained. that he had dropped them. It appears that he had gone to the bank and drawn a sufficient amount to pay the wages in the establishment where he is employed. He was very fortunate in recovering all the money, as there, was a strong wind at the time and the. notes were blown in all directions. .-,- '

A' curious position was presented to the Waikato Hospital Board at Hamilton last week on an application by a woman residing at Huntly for maintenance. It was shown' that the woman had, left her, husband' and had been living with, another man for: eight years, and had. six ■ illegitimate children, the youngest of ' which was seven months old and the eldest seven years. The father of the children had left them and'their mother on the pretence of seeking employment in another part of the cotmtry, and the mother and children were now destitute. It was pointed out by the board's secretary that the woman and her children came to the district from Napier about six months ago, their fares up having been -paid by the Government. If the children were committed to a charitable home from anywhere in the Waikato district the Waikato board would be responsible for their maintenance until they reached the age of 14 years. By sending them bark to Napier, however, the liability wou-d be transferred to the Hawke's Bay board, which was really the responsible body. The board decided, before adopting the latter plan, to, make an endeavour to find the 'father of the children, and compel him to support them.

■ Noticing some fairly large sharks swimsmiiig about near the shore on the ocean side of the .beach at Westshore on a recent afternoon (says the Hawke's Bay "Tribune") four young men "bathing" there thought they would derive some amusement by attempting, to catch one of the monsters by means of a line. 'After considerable angling they were successful in. hooking a big but it succeeded in freeing itself. The next - attempt, however, -was;, more successful and a shark measuring ,BJffc. in length was landed on. the - beach. In the evening some Maoris cut the fish up and carried the pieces home tp sraok.e and eat,

Sheaf-tossing is becoming a very, popular'event at North Island sports gather^ ings and agricultural and' pastoral shows. '< At the Linton sports over 20 young 'men, principally farm hands, competed in this event, at the Marton /"show there were 31 competitors, the' winner tossing the sheaf_ 24ft. 1 At Awahuri, last month, the winner won with a toss of 23ft, llin, The event consists of throwing a sheaf of rushes or corn, which is bound round the base with a piece of sacking or similar material, over a bar which is swung between two uprights, similar to .a football goal post. Each competitor has three tosses at the different heights, the event being finally won by the one who throws the sheaf highest according to the rules prescribed. ,

A recent cable message from England stated that the # horse-serum is now being used for. healing wounds. Inquiries made in Wellington (says the, '■'Post") shows that this treatment has been applied in New Zealand and "in other parts of the world for some years past. , There, however, is a peculiar scientific aspect, say medical and-1 bacteriological experts, which requires to be guarded against in the case of serum belonging to an anijnal different from the animal to which it is applied; and sometimes very serious effects result. When horse serum is applied to a very large raw surface on a' human being there is great"-probability that serious trouble, if not death* will ensue. The application requires to be made under medical supervision.

Omsk, Siberia, has become the outfitting point for an extraordinary migration, estimated at 2,000,1W people annually, which pours into the country bordering on -Mongolia. Nothing in Europe of Asia has &rer been quite so like 'the springing up of the great cities of the American Middle West as is the growth to-day of new towns in Siberia. Except that 'the tide is moving east instead of west the movement has many parallels to the wonderful migration which- won the West for America.; There are, however, two. striking' differences.-. The first is that! the pioneering is comparatively luxurious. : compared to the American movement, while the- natives, instead of being swept aside, are being absorbed by intermarriage with the settler. The 10-day journey up the Irish' River from Omsk into the 'promised land is made by steamboats which are the last word in the luxury and convenience' of river -traffic. It is by no means a monotonous journey, as the river banks' swarm with wild fowl and four-footed game, while the scenery in. many places is wonderful. That Omsk intends to become a modern city as soon as possible indicated by the condition of her streets. ?' In the business section of the-town sewers, gas mains, and underground telegraph and telephone wires are being installed, while street car track layers are working over the, heads of the diggers. Siuylar work is bin g done in many other of the new Siberian towns.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140223.2.12

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8801, 23 February 1914

Word Count
2,987

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8801, 23 February 1914

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working