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BOROUGH AFFAIRS.

TO Tl! E EDITOR. . . Sir,—While thanking for your pleasant reply to some of my remarks, contained in.your leader of last night, allow me to point out, that you have oither misunderstood me, .or inadvertently misconstrued what I intended to oorivey, when I said, "Wait until the population is considerably increased." I was not considering the. birth-rate of the Borough, but meant householders and ratepayers who would help to bear the burden. Then, again, you refer to | the cost of installation of £25,000 to £30,000 as being possibly the amount; but there also I wish to remind you, this would be probably to the outside of our footpath, when the householders' expenses would begin, and it would be a wise man who could foretell when j their 'expenses would cease. I have had a little experience with our water service, which is carried out on all fours. The next move wo\ild be .for the resi- j dents on our Belts to apply to be allowed to connect, which in due course, t in committee, would be granted, but we ; borough householders would have to | pay the interest on loan, as well as, j extra rates, and they smile,, saying: "Tin's is pleasant, and no responsibility incurred." The other boroughs that ryou point to as having everything they can desire: the question is—Can they afford it? or will there be a day of (reckoning? We have heard a whisper that some of the younger boroughs have gone too fast. Even dear old London has paid for its experience. They have made what you would term past improvements, but''the consequence is i now being felt by many owners. The rates have killed their incomes; they, of necessity, sell and lea Ye. This applies nearer home as well. I was brought up in a different school. We had to.study ways and means, and there was not unlimited credit or debt collectors in my time; and we lived notwithstanding, and were fairly happy and contented. But to-day the motto is apparently "Deny yourself nothing," or, as some of the younger birds of passage, in the language of the clay, would I say the paying for these advantages is the other fellow's "pie." i RESIDENT OF NEARLY 40 YEARS.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140221.2.11.1

Bibliographic details

BOROUGH AFFAIRS., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8800, 21 February 1914

Word Count
375

BOROUGH AFFAIRS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8800, 21 February 1914

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