Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

COLONEL BECOMES COOK.

A story was told by a young Englishman who had returned from Canada, having made in a few short years more money than he would have earned all his life in England. On landing in •the Dominion he trok the first job that was offered him, which happened to be cutting wood to feed the kitchen fire. The cook was also an Englishman, whom the young man was heard to address as "Sir," In reply to a Canadian, who inquired whether it was the custom to address cooks as " Sir,'! the young man replied, " You see, the cook was once a colonel commanding a battalion, and as I had been only a subaltern in the army, it did not occur to me to call him anything else." It must foe realised that the colonial must labour with his hands when occasion arises, arid so far from work being viewed as a, tragedy, as it often is in this country, it is the lack of it that is the tragedy in the Dominions. It is therefore necessary in this, as in many other things, to readjust one's point of view. .Taking these things into consideration, therefore, there is a great deal to be said ■- in favour of the British woman emigrant obtaining her training in the Overseas Dominions, and requests have already been received by the Colonial", Intelligence League from different -parts of the Empire for the establishment of settlements an their midst, and this is one of the chief aims and ideals ■oi the league. . --.''■•

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140220.2.53.2

Bibliographic details

COLONEL BECOMES COOK., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8799, 20 February 1914

Word Count
258

COLONEL BECOMES COOK. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8799, 20 February 1914

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working