Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LOCAL AND GENERAL.

During the past week or two there has been an exceptionally large number of visitors to Ashburton, and consequently local accommodation houses have had a busy time.

Most people have hoard more or less of tin 1 doings of the individual known to the motoring fratei-uity as the "road hoii," but objectionable as the road hog may bo. he cannot, io use a colloquialism,"hold a candle to a certain young " gentleman " who rode through Leeston'on Sunday afternoon on a motor bicycle, .with a; lady by his side in a side-car. This individual was :sp intoxicated with his own importance that he dashed through a funeral procession at the corner of High Street and Lake Road at a high rate of speed, cutting the procession in two with the dexterity of a stock driver, to the evident disgust of the mourners and a large number of their friends. j

At the Christchurch Wool Sales on Thursday last, 12th instant, the New Zealand* Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, Ltd., topped tlie market for Merino wool, with tho Westward Ho clip, the property, of Mr William Morgan, Metliven. ' 2 244

The telephone subscribers' m ■ Ashburton J number 255, and are steadily increasing. If 150 subscribers-.were to pay an extra £1 per year tb£ telephone bureau would be open night and day—in fact, would never' be closed. But there is evidently little need locally for a continuous service, as several attempts to induce subscribers to pay the extra money so that the bureau would be qpen at all times have tailed.

Given fine weather, the harvest in Ashburton County should be completed in about three weeks' time. In some districts it is already over and the grain is being carted in. In places near tlie hills all the crops are not yet ripe, but they will'not be long before they are ready for the reapers. J\umbers of men having finished their contracts, there is again sufficient labour, and some harvesters are making south to help garner in the grain there.

Tho ndjourhed sports of the North Canterbury Public Schools are to be held in Lancaster Park *on next. About 40 boys of the Ashburton Borough School will take part, competing in the figure display arid physical exercises, while individual pupils 'will endeavour to annex some of the athletic events. A - number of the teachers of the Borough School, ' including the headmaster, will attend the sports, arid the boys will be in charge of Mr S. Baitrd.

A matter affecting the liberty of local bodies was discussed at the last meeting of the Patea Council, consequent upon the application by a settler for compensation in respect to injuries received as a result of his librse shying at a-heap of road metal left on the side of the road. The chairman said the council wa£ quite within its rights in leaving metal on the side of the road, and it was decided not: to.,.reeog-: nise the, claim. - v ", ,"

In a lecture given before the members of the Naturalists' Society v of New South Wales last week, Mr !Finigin,:, secretary of tlie Bird Lovers' League, stated that he knew of a pas-try-cook in Victoria who bought- annually 1000 dozen mutton birds' eir $s which he used in his business as a substitute for new-laid duck eggs. The egg of the mutton bird, Mr Finnigan explained, is about 3in. long, and almost perfectly resembled a duck egg. When fried or boiled the difference might be discovered, but in the case of an egg being used for cake-making detection would be impossible.

Apples are suggested as dental preservatives. Dental treatment is of little use in advanced cases, of neglect, hence the need for periodical inspection, especially of children's teeth, so that the disease may be arrested in its, early stages said Mr W. H. Dolamore, in a lecture on "The Care of the Teeth," delivered at the Royal Dental Hosm'tal of London, Leicester Square. Savages, who ate coarse food,: were able, to; keep their teeth clean, but artificial cleansing was, said the lecturer, essential in civilised life, -although decay would doubtless be very .much lessened if the food jeaten was harder, iof .; if, at the end of•' each, meal, some hard substance, such as an apple was eaten.

Mr Fred. Pirani, Chairman of the Wanganui Education Board, entered the domain of prophesy at the Hewinui School picnic on Friday afternoon last. Addressing the assemblage he ventured to prophesy, that in the near future the smaller schools would merely be utilised for the; education of the younger children, and ;\vhen they reached, say, the fourth standard, they would ha\-e to go to a large ■ central institution, specially established for the purpose of providing a thorough vocational education —right up .to the University standard—for the professions^.- scientific farming and the utilisation of the' land, domestic science, hygiene, engineering, the different trades, etc. The difficulty in the way, in the past had been the absence of good means of conveyance and communication, but that V'as being rapidly overcome.

-.. In the past the expensive part of 'Territorial training .has-been' the drilling of small numbers of Territorials at remote "backblock" townships. Instructors in country districts have even now to spend a great deal of their time travelling from place'to-place,'and naturally this costs money. Evidently the Defence Department has decided that there mvist be a limit to this expenditure, for a. note in the latest District Orders states: "Men who live at a distance of more than one hour's journey (two hours if mounted) from a drill centre will in future perform their training with the general training sections, and will not be posted to the' Territorial Force subject to the upkeep of the establishment." In relation to this ruling it has been decided that no more drill centres will be established unless special circumstances demand it, in which case the matter will be referred to the district headquarj^rs. No training has yet been" prescribed for men posted to the, general training section.,

I The. need for drastic reform in regard to the, mental hospitals of the Domin*. ion lias been urged in season and out of season for years by would-be reformers, medical and otherwise. Thei President ofv the Australasian Medical Gonaress (Dr. A. Ohallinor Purchas, of Auckland) adverted! to the subject in his presidential address.; It was an open secret, he said, : that the mental hospitals of* New Zealand were badly overcrowded. T.liose entrusted . witji the care of ..these patients were greatly hampered in their treatment of, the patients by the absence of proper classification. The doctor proceeded: "This undoubtedly is the pressing need, a,nd one which should be? remedied without delay, because it is well recognised that the recovery of many cases is retarded, and that of other cases is rendered impossible, from Lhe impossibility of pro-i per classification owing to overcrowd- * ing. Further, there is a pressing' need for what might be termed a convalescent homo or observation hospital where patients could be placed on trial for a term before boinq; returned to their homes, where they "sometimes relapse. Such an institution would also serve as a safe and proper place for those doubtful cases which require watching for a time before being committed to a mental hospital."

The Ashburton Senior Cadet Com-, panics will journey to Timaru on April 30 where they will be inspected by General lan Hamilton (InspectorGeneral of the Oversea Forces.)

The annual Show of , the Ashburton Horticultural Society commences to-, morrow in the Theatre Royafl at 2 P-m. So far, the entries have come in freely and the show promises to be a success. In addition to the show, other attractions have been provided for the public. .

In pursuit of his retiovery of the treasure from the General Grant, a letter just received in 7.Dunedin states, Mr E. C. May has left San Francisco with a boat fitted with .the latest salvaging appliances. The vessel will call at £he /Society Islands, and 1 thence proceed to the Auckland Islands, where it is expected she will arrive about the first week in March. After putting off part of her cargo (lumber, machinery, etc.), the vessel "will come on to Bluff, where Mr May has a quantity of stores to be picked up. / ' '::.-

A telegram to the Sydney "Sun " states tliat D. McKinlay; of Eveleigh, the driver of a passenger train from Sydney to Picton, after 4' 1 passing Cabraniatta had occasion to mount the tender of his engine in connection with certain duties. A loose telegraph wire which "*vas hanging over the line at the time caught him under tl*e,chinV and -he was dragged from', the, tender and suspended in midair while the train which was travelling at. 30 miles an hour, passed on. McKinlay fell on to the platform of the third carriage, and when picked up was found to have a bone of the right ;arni'broken and aj badljT lacerated throat. -, i

A prediction that the exports', fljomthe 1-' Dominion-would re^eh £25,000,000 for the present' producing' year was made by the Prime Minister at Paengaroa. on Saturdayi As agriculturists, New Zealatiders were now going to be given .the opportunity, of -.'. helping America out in her f odd "supplies.' "In order to show the United States > what we can do in this direction," said Mr Massey, " the New Zealand Government has decided to spend £15,000 in making an exhibit at the Panama Exhibition. The Union Steam Ship Company* has offered to take the country's exhibits to San Francisco free, and; if necessary, to-bring them back without a penny of cost.—(Applause). X hope the producers of, the Dominion will take advantage of this generous, offer." ,

While some men love plenty of publicity, others are not at all partial, to the limelight. Of course, it all depends upon the cause. Last week (writes a correspondent of the Wanganui- 'Chronice"), a young man belonging to the latter ■ category was up before the court at Patea on the charge of having committed a breach of the Borough bylaws. When a convection.'was.recorded and a fine imposed.: he made a /ratherunusual application to the Bench, ■ namely j that the paper be stopped from publishing his name. The genial S.M., smiled, and said that he had no controlover the newspapers. Then,' turning, to the proprietor of the local•--paper 1/ he threatened that if his name was published he would institute Court proceedings. The defendant, during the hearing of the case, said that he was ignorant of t;he borough by-laws, but that,. apparently, is not the .only question he knows very little about, as evidenced by the ridiculous application he subsequently made to the Bench.;

. • New Zealandei's,who have left these shores, for';;the purpose of taking a trip to 1 the Old Country and Europe, usually come back with the firm conviction that-in most of the. hotels at which they put up the waiters, and. the proprietors, too, in some instances, never leave anythiilg to cliaiiCS when it is, a .question 'of obtaining a_ tip>'••■ Apropos 'of this statement, a well-known Duhedih resident, who. has just returned; from a trip abroad, has brought back with him. : a little placard which was hung on the. wall of the hotel in Milan at which he stayed. These placards are printed in several languages, and read: —"Tips.' Travellers who wish to give tips to the servant's (conductor at the station not included) are respectfully requested to note here the amount for each of the servants they intend to gratify, and to intrust the direction with the distribution." -That no one shall be missed, a small; nearly-ruled table is appended, in the spaces of which the visitor is expected to mark the amount of the tips he wishes to give. None of the* servants, apparently, is forgotten, as mention is made of,the dining-room waiters, upstairs waiters, maids, valets (boots and luggage), hall porter, night"porter, and the page boys. The traveller", however has consolation in the fact that in' the . Italian towns the amount of the tips expected is not nearly so great as is looked for. in some other citiesAmerican, more particularly.

i A case of considerable importance to I buyers and sellers of landed property came before Mr Justice Sim at a sitj tine.-'of the Supreme Court in Banco on I Thursday (says the "Otago Daily Times,"). This was an appeal by Peter Brand against the'decision^oj^the Minijst^ii of Stamp Duties tha^t'aiim'p-vduty was payable; on a certain ,salevof.land. The matter arose in this way: There was a sale from James Borrie (Inchclutha, farmer), to .PeteiT /aad i John Brand (Inchelutlia,; farmers), ;i of 303> acres. Brand Bros, partitioned the property. Peter Brand sold "his partistioned part, consisting of '154* acres, to George and Robert Knox (Inchclutha, farmers) for the sum of £4645. The Stamp Department claimed duty, not only on the sub-sale from Peter Brand to !Kiiox Bros., but also on the amount of the' 1 consideration in the sale from Borrie to' Brand! Bros. Peter Brand objected to the assessment, contending that the only duty payable was the duty on the sub-sale. The questions for the opinion of the court were: (1) Is the assessment of the Minister correct ? and (2) If not, what is the correct assessment of stump duty ? Mr Bundle appeared for the appellant (Peter Brand), and Mr J. F. M. Fvaser, K.C., for the Minister of Stamp Duties. Mr Bundle said that at present any number of land transactions were covered'by ono duty—viz., tho last consideration. Mr Fra&er admitted that that had been the practice of the department, and said that he personally had grave doubts as to whether that construction was correct. His Honour reserved his decision.

The s.s. Cairnrbss cargo.—Among the Canadian cargo arriving in.. Lyttelton about the 28th of the month is a shipment of six Ford Touring Oars for the Ashburton District Agent, Mr G. H. Carson. Several of these-fine Cars have already been sold to local purchasers, and'there'is now only one Car available. Those intending purchasing a Car this year should not fail to examine these new models, which are £?x----aniples of very high-class workmanship. Catalogues free on application. 1 4.5

i The man Joseph Cripps, of Anama, who yesterday was admitted to the Ashburton County Hospital, having been knocked, down by a team of horses, has sustained a fractured thigh bone.

The retail butchers in Sydney have come to an agreement with their employees in connection with tho weekly holiday question, the matter being dealt with before the Wages Board. Jho award hai been varied to provide that general shops' shall be open from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. on all week-days, except Wednesday, when the closing hour will be 12 noon. Shops in tho city, known as " schedule shops," ,are to be open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on each week-day (an hour longer than the general shops), and be closed "all day " oil the Wednesday.

As an indication of the manner' in which the manufacturers of Dunedin are taking up the matter of Otago Industries and Gala Week, tho secretary of the Dunedin Expansion League quotes the following from a letter received by him the other day :—"lt is our intention at an early date to advertise our productions by renting premises in the .centre of the city, We are now negotiating for a shop, into which we intend putting a quantity of our own make of doors. We shall not only use the words, ' Made-in-Otago goods/ but put our own registered brand upon them, our idea being not only to show our work, i but, if possible, manufacture doors in New Zealand to meet the foreign .door.' 1

The mystery of the famous Glenriddell manuscripts of Robert Burns, which were sold by the Athenaeum Library of Liverpool last ' summer for £5000, and for which a committee ot Scots has .since, been searching, was dramatically solved at the dinner of the ,St. Andrew's Society at Philadelphia. iVIr John Gribbel, a-manufacturer and a celebrated cOllfeSStbr of manuscripts, announced that-the missing manuscripts were in his,, possession and ■ that he would return them to Scotland. Mr Gribbel said he bought the manuscripts, which " disappeared from Liverpool with an unknown buyer," from a dealer a fortnight ago. Subsequently he announced that he would present the manuscripts to whichever institute in Scotland Lord Rosebery, whose advice he had asked, might select. .

A search is now being made by _a number of schoolmistresses, both, in England and Germany, for the girls' ideal"game. They had previously decided that the ideal had been, found in lacrosse, which is now much played. But some.of last term's experiences suggest tlmt lacrosse as a girls' game has been ruined (says the London " Daily Mail). It was quite ideal at first, but in an evil moment some Canadian specialists were called in to. coach at one of the biggest girls' schools. Thanks to their- too-efficient advice the neat and pretty upward throws and continual catching of the ball were' rejected in favour bf the downward throw and more forcible methods which make the game one of the roughest there is, if the method is carried out as it is, for example, by professionals in Canada. Hockey is much played and keeps its popularity. But some parents object, and a quieter game is wanted for younger girls as an alternative for the coming term. Among tho'-e who are organising the search baslu-;>ball is, so far, the favourite. It consists almost wholly of passing, and has none of the collaring or individual running of similar games. But basket-ball is rather too gentle in some resp.ects, and gives the umpire excessive work." Ohe solution is lacrosse with a new code of rules forbidding over-hand work, so that the game as originally played at High Wycombe and other schools should be restored to its first charm.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140218.2.17

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8797, 18 February 1914

Word Count
2,968

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8797, 18 February 1914

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working