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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

In the country on Sunday many farmers "took advantage of the fine weather, and various gangs of men were to be .seen at work. Since the weather has taken up some harvesters have earned substantial cheques.

Mr W. J. Moore has grown some fine specimens of sunflowers in his garden this season. A reporter was shown one to-day which was fully 7ft 6in in height and the flower about 13in. in, diameter.

The attendance at the Tinwald School is keeping well up,, despite tho fact that a few of tho children are unable to; attend owing to the-harvest. The school has.risen a grade this year, and Miss Makeig, formerly of Hampstead School, has been temporarily appointed to Tinwald as a pupil teacher.

A Christchurch Press Association 'message states ' that the Conciliation Council will be required this week to consider two • applications for an award in the carpenters' and joiners' case. "The Amalgamated Society of Carpenters and Joiners, and the Canterbury Carpenters' and, Joiners' Association failed to agree, and both have cited the employers.

Some.i curiosity, has been evinced as to the real mission of Mr R. Semple, organiser of the Federation of Labour, in visiting - Australia. The "Otago Daily Times" has it on reliable authority that lie is being sent across for the purpose of raising; a loan of £1000, to be devoted to securing additional temporary organisers in view 1 of the present industrial position in the Dojmjnion and the coming elections. ,

At the bridge the Ashburton Riveils now divided into three streams, the greatest volume of water passing down the centre of the river-bed,yand at the southern bank is the next most important stream. About 100 yards below the bridge all three arms, join and sweep with great force against the northern bank, but further on again part of the water finds its way into the centre of the river-bed.

No new appointments to the Legislative Council will be made for about four months. The Prime Minister, in reply to a question in Auckland (says the "Herald") stated that any appointments which it may be necessary; to make will be made shortly. ,before Parliament meets in June. The Bill providing for an Elective Upper Chamber will again 'be introduced during t-his gear's session, "

The floor of the dressing>!siieds at -the'j bathing ponds at the .Tinw.al'd Domain^ have recently been covered with grating, and on account,of the fact that the 220-yds championship of Canterbury is to be decided at- •'. the forthcoming swimming carniyal a wooden wall has been erected at one end for the swimmers to turn on. The pond, ist in excellent condition, and, with recent additions, it is considered one of the best for swimming sports in. Canterbury.

A Cambridge resident claims to have a rival— or rivals—for the goose that lays the golden eggs. He has kept record of the egg production 6f a, pen of eight Black Orpington hens for 12 months from February 3,. 1913, to February 13, 1914, and the remarkable aggregate of 2232 eggs is arrived at, giving an average per hen of 279 eggs. These figures show «a return, atypne penny per egg, of £9 6s for the pen of eight hens.

Here and there a dead sheep is to be noticed, lying about the paddocks. A sheep that dies in the Ashburton County has hot had time to grow cold before it is rent by hawks and seagulls, some of the latter _ travelling right to the foot of the hills in search of food. The seagull, when a feast of mutton is not obtainable, employs its time catching insects for food, whereby it does its share to retard the increase of insect pests.' • .'" ■ -. '■ '■■'■ " '■.

The Australian magpie has been pronounced, a most desirable bird by farmers, of Ashburton County by reason of the good work it does in grass grabs'and other harmful. insects. Though in places in this district, .at dawn, the' melodious notes of "the magpie oarolluigits morning song may be heard,, tlie, birds are not increasing at a satisfactory rate. The reason for this is that oil these plains there are no trees sufficiently high as to- be. beyond the. reach/ of iboys in .quest".-i * _f '' birds' nests, an.d,. consequently, magpies' nests are' often'robbed of the young. ■•''

A party who journeyed to; Staveley bush yesterday found the weather on the hills insufferably hot. About 11 o'clock a mist /.came over . but was quickly dispersed' by the scorching rays' ;of the sun, which beat down with tropical fierceness, while in the bush and the valleys there was no stir in the air to temper the atmosphere. Compared with the plains below, tho hills were as a frying 'pan, and it was a great relief to descend to the plain and be fanned by a cooling breeze. At Staveley there is still some thick, impenetrable huslru but*- it appears to have been almost denuded of bird life. Now and again the musical notes of the bellbird may be heard from the deepest recesses of the forest, but the other birds which frequent; the-, bush may nearly all be met with daily in and around Ashburton. . i

The s.s. Cairnross cargo.—Among ihe Canadian cargo arriving in Lyttelton about the 28th of the month is a shipment of six Ford Touring Oars for the Ashburton District Agent, Mr G. H. Carson. Several of these fine Cars have already been sold to local purchasers, and there is now only one Car available. Those intending purchasing aCar this year should not fail to examine these new models, which are examples of very high-class workmanship. Catalogues free on application. 1 45

Ihe turnip crops in the County lying near the hills are looking very well, and already the sheep have been turned on them. .

A cable from Melbourne states that applications are being invited by the if• f Government 'for the position of °™®r Quarantine officer, at a salary of

Ihe chief feature of Tinwald at the present time is weeds. The ox-eyed daisy occupies the most important place, and it is well seconded by docks, while broom and thistles flourish luxuriously. Ih e weeds give the town an unkempt and neglected appearance.

. Tlle landscape throughout the County, is now dotted ■ all over with v grain stacks. There does not appear to be any recognised shape for a stack, as they vary considerably in formation, the builders evidently following their own fancies in construction. ■

Besides cases already dealt with by the court, the Hutt Borough Council is investigating 72 more cases of motorists who are alleged to have, exceeded the speed limit in' the Hutt .Since April 189 names of owners, whose cars travelled at more than 23 miles an hour over the borough streets, have been nlaced on.the books of the council.

Statements come from. all parts of the County to the effect that the grain crops are not yielding nearly so well ;this season as was anticipated. ■". Some grain-growers in the -Wakanui district have been greatly disappointed, and a Springfield,; farmer- told a L reporter today that areas; in Springfield that had yielded as .high as 60 bushels to /the acre last' year would not return more than from "30 to 35' bushels tins season.

An interesting fiscal '■ comparison was utilised by Mr T. .M. -, Wilford in addressing the jury in,a sedition case at Wellington Supreme Court. He said that he might ;tell "anu'au'diehce that, the amount paid in land tax in one year by the owners of millions of acres was £728,0*30, and that, on the other hand, the total sum paid in duty upon tobacco, used so largely by the working class, was £600,000, and his object in so speaking might be, to create dissatisfaction, but it was not probable that he would be run in for sedition.

As residuary legatee under Miss Elizabeth Andrews's will, CardinalGibbons, the eminent American divine, has received between 200,000 and 300,000 dollars. The cardinal said the money would be used for Catholic educational work. The estimated value of Miss Andrews's personal property is 600,000 dollars, and it was said her holdings of real estate would be found to be of equal value. Specific monetary legacies in the will for religious and charitable purposes aggregate 21,000 dollars. \

In tlie Supreme Court at Auckland to-day (says a Press Association telegram), in the case of Minnie Frewin, a young woman charged with setting fire to a billiard room at Huntly, Mr Justice Cooper said it had been represented that she was driven from home by the ill-treatment of her husband, and was betrayed by another man, and again led astray by the owner of the billiard room. It was an extremely sad case. He did not- want to send the woman to gaol, and placed her in the hands of the Salvation Army. Subsequently, his Honour gave the woman some, advice privately in the presence of counsel.

It is announced that Yale and Har-j yard, America's universities, will henceforth insist that the students shall speak arid' write better English. Owing largely to the great influx of foreigners, English in the United States has been at rather a low ebb lately, and it is thought that steps should be j taken \ before it is too late to achieve the much-needed reform. Judge txrant, | of Boston, an author and jurist, deserves credit for calling attention to the 1 fact that the, conversation of the average university man here is below that of the average man in Oxford and Cambridge/and he maintained that Yale and Harvard • should lead the way in effecting an improvement. : . v

Dealing with the subject of the foundation of the colony of New Zealand and the influence of Scotsmen thereou, a Wellington writer says;:—"lt was chiefly through the action of one of. the magistrates of Glasgow, Mr John Fleming of ■ Olairhiont, that New Zealand was retained as a British possession. He was about the first, if not the first, man in the Kingdom to direct the attention of the Government to the possibilities of New Zealand, as a British settlement. He took up the matter with enthusiasm,- and enlisting the services of such men as Dr. Norman McLeod. Sheriff Allison, and Lord Provost Lumsden. convened a meeting in the Glasp-ow lAthenseum on May 15, 1840, which was the means of arousing public attention, to, the question : all over the country,;-"arid brought about the annexation of'■= the islands in time to nrevent their passing into the hands of the French. It was,doubtless the outcome of Glasgow's connection with the annroonation of "the islajnds for Great Britain, that; New Zealarid was largely colonised Joy Scotsmen." r ; w,< :'-. '

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140216.2.14

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8795, 16 February 1914

Word Count
1,770

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8795, 16 February 1914

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