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IN THE LAND OF FREE TRADE.

Turniag now to England, the home of the industrial .2-evohition and the land of free trade, we find combinations as flourishing, though.of a slightly different structure, as in the hide-bound and 'Super-disciplined land of the German. f in discussing these various trade arrangements it must be clearly under- : • stood that we do not impute any illegality in their existence nor any misconduct on the part of their founders. ' With a Government openly approving of working arrangements between competing railways, with . the free trade door always open to possible competitors, no one can say that the arrange.ments are illegal qn the one hand or the cause of extortionate prices on the other. . The development of the thread industry into a great trust is so typical ol the English method that I will brie; describe it. In a very modest mill in Paisley, James Coats ■ started to manufacture sewing thread in 1826: Sons and grandsons inherited the business, together with James' genius' for management, and the business grew into 'great magnitude. In. 1890 a limited liability company was organised to take over the mills of J. and P. Coats, paying about £5,800,000 for the property, which included a mill in America.

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19140205.2.60.2

Bibliographic details

IN THE LAND OF FREE TRADE., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8786, 5 February 1914

Word Count
205

IN THE LAND OF FREE TRADE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXXIII, Issue 8786, 5 February 1914

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