Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Farmers' Union.

ANNUAL CONFERENCE,

Unii-ed I'roaa Apjociation—By Electric Tulegraph.

Welmngton, July 10 The TS.Z. Favmors' Union Conference con. clun^d on IViaav.

Mr W. Stubte (Palmorston North) was re-appnmfced Treasurer.

Mr- D. Joner- (North Canterbury) moved —'"That the -Railway Department be urged to allow the Fmmors' Union the same concessions and privileges as Friendly Societies and other bodies." He advocated the holding of Farmers' Union picnics to develop the focial side of tho Union. The motion was carried. Mr Boddie (Taranaki) moved—"Thatthe Government be r.rgod to establish » properly equipped experimental dairy station in a central position in the North Island." Mr O'Halloran secondacl tho motion, which was carried. Mr Wily moved:—That the Executive enquire into the Harbour Board Acts, with a view to having provision made for tho representation of farmers."—Carried.

After the usual complimentary votes, the Conference closed.

At a meeting of th 9 Executive held later, Auckland, Taranaki, Poverty Bay.Hawke's Bay, Wellington, Nelson, Canterbury, Otago, and Southland were all represented. Messrs Birch, Cooper, and Richards, all of Wellington, were appointed as the Advisory Committee. It was deaided to hold a summer conference in Christchurch during November, the procedure to be similar to that; at the winter conference.

The appointment of the general secretary was left to the Advisory Committee.

In replying to a deputation from the Union, Sir Joseph Ward said that as for granting the. concession to the Union to hold picnics in tho same way as other Friendly Societies, ho wished to do something in the matter if it could be done without committing tha Dapartmant to too mucn. The railway service would not stand it if every one of the 350,000 people in societies registered under the Act was admitted to hold picnics as proposed. When the Railway Statement came down they would see that provision was made for a very large increase in the number of tracks.

The deputation then waited on Mr Seddon. When Mr Wilson spoke of the necessity of giving tradesmeu in the towna an opportunity of getting on tho land, even at the expense of relaxing the residential qualifications, Mr Seddon referred him to his own remarks at the opening of Parliament, in which he took the same viovt. The deputation desired to see a dairy experimental school established. Mr Seddon said that the question of site would be one of the knotty points.

Mr Wilson: It was mentioned today that one local body in New Zealand was thinking of offering a reserve for the paroose. Mr Seddon said they proposed to make it optional for the counties to utilise the Government valuations, or to make valuations of their own for their own purposes, but the Government would retain its own valuers for its taxation. The Government had had it shown to them conclusively that the sterilisation of bones in New Zealand would cost something like £1 a ton. If ifc could be proved that they could do it cheaper the Government was quite prepared to look into the matter for next session. The time had arrived when something must be done in the direction of establishing a dairy station, and the representations of Mr Kiusella were before the Cabinet, but it was almost as difficult to fix upon n site for a dairy station in New Zealand as one for the capital of Australia.

Mr Wilson, in thanking the Premier for his reception of the deputation, said thematter of agricultural education would bd dealt with fully at the agricultural societies' conference next week.

The Premier replied that ever/ country school in the colony should have something in the way of a cottage garden for elementary instruction.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19050717.2.29

Bibliographic details

Farmers' Union., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXII, Issue 6623, 17 July 1905

Word Count
606

Farmers' Union. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXII, Issue 6623, 17 July 1905

Working