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MR DEAKIN'S PESSIMISM.

United Pres3 Association—Per Electric Telegraph—Uoypright

Melbourne, June 13 Mr Deakia, in an interview on the question of defence, said that Australia, which used to depend largely on her isolation, was now within striking distance of sixteen foreign naval stations. The defence forces were inadequate and imperfectly supplied with war material. They were exceptionally weak on the naval side, and therewere no vessels or forts capable of properly defending the cr.asts. It wa3 doubtful if they were prepared to meet a dash by cruisers, and they were markedly deficient in defensible coaling and refitting stations. He did not think that Australia could afford to agree to an extension of the naval agreemeufc until the harbours, coaling stations, and naval bases were placed in a fit state of protection. A great influx of desirable settlers was necessary, with a view to the efficient defence of the whole continent. Given thai-, he had the highest hopes of future naval development. The very least that they could be content with w:is such expenditure on such defence forces as would afford a reasonable guarantea of the safety of the ports, the cities, and the coast.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19050614.2.13.1

Bibliographic details

MR DEAKIN'S PESSIMISM., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXII, Issue 6595, 14 June 1905

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193

MR DEAKIN'S PESSIMISM. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXII, Issue 6595, 14 June 1905

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