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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

River Report—The Telegraph Department advises as follows :~The Rakaia, Eangitatn, and Waitaki rivers are ia good order for fishing. Father Hats' Lecture.—By an advertisement in this issue ticket holders are advised that admission will be by the stige door of the Oddfellows' Hall up to 730 o'clock. Angling—Mr W. N. Jones of Arundel, has had a most successful angling season. He states that his total catch for the season up to date is 700 fish, averaging about lib each in weight. Presentation.—Mr James Gufchbertson, who has been agricultural manager of the Springfield Estate, Methven, for 17 year?, was presented, on the occasion of his departure for the Old Country, with a valuable gold watch and chain by Mr D. Cameron and the employees on the estate. Mr Cuthbortson leaves for England to-day. A Coming Attraction,—Mr W. J. Lincoln, advance agent for Mr J. C. Williamson, was in town to-day, making arrange- | ments for the appearance of the BioTableau of the Russo-Japanese war, which 1 has been such a groat attraction in the northern cities. A Visiting Artiste.—Mr George Musgrove's representative arrived last evening to arrange preliminaries in connection with the visit of Auguste Van Biene and his powerful London Dramatic Compauy, who appear for one njghb only at the Oddfellows' Hall, on Wednesday evening, in the famous drama " The Broken Molody." Ruapuka District.—-The farmers in the Ruapuna district have had an exceptionally good season this year. The oat crops hay? turned out splendidly, tha yields being much over the average. A larger area than usual is sown this year in turnips, and the majority of farmers are now feeding those off. The plantations throughout the district are thriving splendidly, and what waa an unfenced tussock country some twelve years ago has now been coaverted into one ! of the most prosperous districts in the ; county. A Reputation—For nearly twenty five years our business has been established, and vre have always been very careful to sustain ii good reputation. VVe have just opened out a splendid lot of new and fashionable goods for the present season. Out suits are "known anywhere," because they fit so well keep th,eir shape and wear so well. We study our customers, and they appreciate our motto " satisfaction/'—Craighead and BEiiRTMAN, The Leading Tailors and Outtitters. 0

No-License Prospects ik Christchurch —A well-known Christchuroh bonifaoe recently expressed the opinion that the result of the next local option poll in Chrisfcchurch would be disastrous to the liquor interest. He stated that even brewery wnployees had voted and intended voting no-licensa. and gave names «nd instances where this h*d beoa the cise. Under the oiraumstauca-' thero was no reason to suppose that the opinion expressed wa< other than a bona fide one. Increased Land Values.-—At the sit- | tint; of the land Commission in Cbrigtchurph yesterday Aad tew Allen, district valuer for South Canterbury, said he considered the value of the land had risen 30 per cent since 1897. In reply to Mr Mafcheson, who suggested fch'tt land values might recede when lower pnca-i ruled on the London market, witness expressed the opinion thit present values would remain firm. Albert Freeman, district valuer for Ashbutton and Selwyn Couutk 6 said. There had been a considerable rise in value in his district; he had known some Innrls doubled in value, but the average rise would be from 25 to 40 per cent. Ploughable sheep land had risen probably 60 per cent., though he *'id not think the rise altogether justified. Prosperous seasons, good prices, establishment of creameries etc., and cheap money, had, he thought, baen responsible for the the increase. Pc; sonnlly, he valued laud according to its improvements, and irrespective of the term of tenure. The Assessment Court held that the sowing of grass was an improvement. Oub Ashburton VOLUNTEERS.—Thatour local Volunteers aro no "featherbed warriors" is evdenced by the faot that the march from Dunsandel to Sheffield, under " service conditions," was performed in the remarkably quick time of from 8.30 a.m. on Friday to 4.30 p.m. on Saturday, including all halts. On the Friday night the baggage convoy did not retch the main column until 9 p.m., and, eherefor«, many troopers were not comfortably in bed until a very late hour. However, after a rest and a breakfast consisting of tinned meat, bread and butter and tea, the men continued their march, carrying all their day's rations, and arrived at the Sheffield camp, as stated above. The Ashburtcn Guards were advance guard on both days' marches, the ABhburton Rifles being baggage and, rear guard the first day and part of the main column the second day. The Ashburton Mounted Rifles formed part of the mounted scouts, and put in good work in locating the enemy and keeping up communication throughout the march. A word of praise is due to a Corporal and two Privates of the Guards, who, after leaving business on Saturday night, rode on bicycles from Ashburton to Sheffield, arriving there at 6 a.m., in order to take part in the manoeuvres. It is such men as these that turn out good Volnnteers, and who are always ready to uphold the honour of their corps. A Visiting Evangelist.—Ashburton is shortly to have a visit from «, somewhat noted evangelist in the person of: the Rev. G-. D. Watson, D.D., of the United States of America. He is to commence a mission in the Tabernacle on Sunday, May 7th. Dr Watson served as pastor of various churches, for several years in connection with the Methodist Episcopal Church. For the past twenty-two years he has been travelling, with his wife. Together they have made two evangelistic tours to England, two to the West Indies, and about a dozen to the various parts of Canada and throughout the varioua States in America. Dr Watson is the author of seventeen books dealing with various phases of the Christian life, which have had a large sale. Several of them have been translated into German, Norwegian, Hindostani, Spanish, and Japanese. Dr Watson's mission at the Tabernacle will last from May 7th to 22nd. There will be afternoon and evening meetings. The " Otago Daily Times," referring to Dr Watson's addresses at a Convention held there on Good Friday, says:—-'The addresses were pointed, telling, and powerful. The comment of all who hear Dr Watson is that he is one of the most helpful and fresh expositors ever heard in Dunedin." Dr Watson will arrive in Athburton on Tuesday next, and will be the guest of the Rev. W. L. Salter. An "At Home" will be held at "Trentield," Moore street, on Thursday afternoon, the 27th instant, to give any Ashburton residents who wish an opportunity of meeting Dr and Mrs Watson.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG19050426.2.5

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXII, Issue 6554, 26 April 1905

Word Count
1,117

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXII, Issue 6554, 26 April 1905

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