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EXHIBITION.

TECHNICAL AND SCHOOL WORK. | For several years. Mr W. J. Silcock, a leading member of the Ashburton District 'School Committee, and an old Ashburton resident, ha* been an advocate of technical education in the primary schools of the colony. As a means to an end he conceived the idea of an exhibition of children's work, having it) view tho encouragement <-f the constructive faculty among the young people by the awarding of pii^e for anything that was nv;ritor ous that mighn be" shown ; and the cultivation among Iho boys of a desire for acquiring proficiency in the handling of tools. He knew th-it an exhibition confined to this sort of thins* aljne was not likely to be a very bril.'i'int success, and was therefore prepa ed to cpen the door to exhibits of work of any kind, and to extend the field to a wider area than rhe'single educational district, enclosodwithin the boundaries of the Ashburton school'district. For a lengthened period he was alone in the Committee on this question, his follow members having but little hope of the success of the project and less enthusiasm in it. By and by, however, he was joined on the Committee^.by Mr Charles Braddell, whose clevernew as an amateur cabinet maker is well-known; and Ultimately by Mr H. W. Barrett, also a handy man with tools. These accessions strengthened the hands of Mr Silcock and they were able to convert the Committee to the adyisableness of holding such an exhibition hs Mr Silcock had been advocating. Steps were taken to communicate wsh tha other School Committees in the county on the subject. Fww of these went into the matter with any great heart, but all were at least civil, and many even polite, in acknowledging the circulars received, Some promised to do what they could in aid of the project, bUt for a long time it seemed that j for want of support the proposed exhibition was likely to hang fire, if indeed I it were held at all. The day, however, j was fixed, and arrangements made for holding it; but the members of the Committee, : owing to the scant encouragement given by the other Committee?, had great misgivings as to its success. As the date of the exhibition drew near' hope began to rise, within them, as the number of entries of one kind or another increased, and it began to be evident that » veay interesting exhibition was highly probable.- Still, there was wanting what the Committee mustdesired a fair representation among the exhibits of the country schools, and even of those that are as much town schools as are those in the Ashburton district. Yet, al. though theexhibits were mainly entered by pupils and ex-pupds of the Ashburton school, a very interesting display was made, and the little " fair,' ui the Americans would call it, muifc be pronounced as far as it went, a very great success indeed. The exhibition was held in the large room of the Ashburton school, fronting on Tancred street, and exhibits were re-* ceived up to nine o'clock on Saturday morning, the time for opening having been fixed for ten o'clock. Although but few contributions came from pupils outside the Ashburton school—a fact, perhaps, more to be attributed to a failure on the part of the country committees and teachers to grasp the full meaning and purpose of the Ashburton Committee than to anything else- not a few members of outside Committees paid the exhibition a visit. Among the visitors was Mr James Brown, of Wakahui, whose name has loug been identified with a keen interest in the-- cause of education in the county. Mr Brown was quite captivatod with what he saw, and gave expression to the pleasure he had in looking at the excellent work shown in no stinted terms* Other leaders in the cause of education also visited the exhibition, and from remarks made by them* and the flattering terms they made use of in speaking of the it is sale to prophecy that the exhibition proposed to be held next year, will not beTjy any means confined to the pupil.* »nd ex-pupils of the Ashburton school. The exhibits were disp'ayed on trestle tables in the large room, and iu the case of pictures (of which there was a pleasingly large number), on the walls. Of the class of exhibits which the promoters ef the exhibition would have preferred to see a numerons entry, there were not many, but such as were shown indicated that there are boys attending the Ashburton 'school, who are not without a! knowledge of how to handle tools. Pro- i minent among these exhibits was a very well made * wheelbarrow, substantially built, honestly put together and fairly well finished. It was the work of Master John OLjen, » boy of ten years, and a pupil of tfye Ashburton school. The barrow woidd be* but' sma|l for'fr manto use, but |ts capacity is £mple enough to | put tbe muscular power to the test of a youth five or six years older than its builder. Beside this barrow was ano ther, about half its size, abo well built, and fairly well finished. This barrow was made by Master Craighead, and had evidently been made wholly by him. In the case of Master Olsen's barrow the wheel ip»s of iron, and it is riot supposed that the young builder is an amateur blacksmith as well as a carpenter; while Master Craighead's wheel was wholly of wood, arid bore on the face of it unmisjbakeable sums''of having been made at home, Bqth exhibits received first awards, faster porter exhibited a yery neat little box in the shape of a book, qf a s|ze that coujd be carried in a man s vest pocket. It was a very neat piece qf wprk, lined with yelvefc inside, and prettily varnished. Master John Quane, a lsd of eight or nln?, years, had constructed a model looomotiv a^tine. It would hardly qualify him yot to bourne Engineer-in-Chief to the locomotive department of the New Zealand railways, but worse models of machinery have been produced for the demonstration of an idea by mechanicians''' "of 1 fa*p greater pretensions than 'Johnny Quane, That engine, too, got a first award, and a filter he showed was highly cqinrijanded. On the same stand with this exhibit, was one everybody was pleased to see-a miniature suite of furniture, made by Master Waited : Cambridge.'■ "' Qdtisjdering that the maker'has* been for years a confirmed invalid, and has to be wheeled abbfit in a Bath chair, the toy suite was a wonderful piece of woijk, Thjs lad also exhibited gome exxselleiuVmats, very rieatiy worked, and several plaques of-merit. A fire screen of scrap pictures, neatly arranged and" jiastefulljr mounted, the work of Master George |i|ourd'ie ? got a segond prize. Master Hastings Brad<?ejl showed a collection of birds' eggs, very well arranged, and carefully labelled. His brother George exhibited a collection of sheik also carefully classified and identified. The showcases in which bb£h oi these entries were exhibited wore little works of art in themselves. Masters iTrecl and Affrbd Silcock 1 exjiib'ited oases containing mineral samples,'collected and Classified "by themselves, and ito get together- mp items comprising the cofiieetions the U.ds had jiaken ramblesin tfye hiljis districti visiting' fche Sfouht Somers coa 1 mines, the caves, arid the jime #el4B> faster George B'raddell also got a second prisee fqr a wejj arranged collection pf minerals. 0n onp qf fch£ tables was a framed picture, the frame being beautifully dene in leather work by Miss Agnes Anderson. One can hardly realise a leather flower, but when I looking at the cleverly made floral wreath I that Miss Anderson had set round her picture frame one came very near the realisation o| a leather pse -at anyrafce

there was no denying the beauty of the work nor the talent of the worker. There was an unexpectedly large entry of paintings in oil, and water colon, sketches in black and white, and crayens, while mapping and ornamental penmanship were also fairly represented. Mrs C. Homerehara, at a moment** notice consented to be judge in this department of the exhibition, and expressed her agreeable surprise at th« excellence of the work shown. Miss Ethel Jones shewed four pictures, all from life.. One that was immediately rtcgnised by lovers of sheep dogs was a portrait of her father's (Mr T. M. Jones) well known collie. The grand old dog there was no mistakiuig. He was perfect as to colour and marking, and his p lint r had correctly caught his expression of keen intelligence, representing him in the act of interpreting a command from his mister, with ears erect, his sharp nose in the air, and his quick eye intent on business. Another was a group of ponies, in which Mr W. J, Silcock's old mare " Dixie " was the central figure, and an excellent portrait. A third illustrated a quartetgin Longfellow s—'' Evangeline," and represented a Canadian pioneer, mounted, clad in Indian hunting shirt, and armed to the teeth; while a fourth, perhaps her best effort, 'vas entitled "Misery," and limned a poor old grey horse, gaunt and thin, his very bones looking as if about to start through his worn hide, while he has turned his back bo the pitiless south eastern storm to which it is his sad lotto have been exposed. Miss Jones' work is certainly above ordinary, and it is probable she may yet be heard of in exhibitions of higher pretensions. Miss Edna Douglas fallowed two pictures—one of whioh was much admired for the success the fair artist had achieved with her moonlight effects, and there were not wanting enthusiastic commendations placing this work in the foremost ulace in the exhibition. Miss Olive Alcorn also showed some excellent work, and exhibited ex* quisite taste in the harmonising of her colors and the merit of her drawing, Another joung painter whose work was 1 much a-'mired and very considerably canvassed was Miss Gertie Sparrow, who had ! two pictures on the north wall of the room. Master Harold Curtis, an ex-pupil, exhibited a painting of a ship for which he received a first award of merit, and . Master Hugh Mayo also obtained honors among the pupils f«r his painting. A I book of water colors, shown by Miss M. Nevin, it is to be feared did not receive the attention it merited, simply because it was an unpretending little drawing book, and lay on the table. Bub it well repaid whoever took the trouble lo -look it. The pages devoted to flower "pictures were really charming. Careful in her attention to every detail in the drawing and chaste and correet in her color she cculd not fail to be successful m effect, and the result was a series of really delightful flower pictures. She was not bo successful, however, when she left the flowers and essayed landscape. This lady also exhibited * book of ornamental penmaiibhip that would do honor to the apprentice room of the best lithographic establishment in the colony. Of colored maps there were several exhibited—those of Miss Muriel and Master Ronald Douglas giving evidence of great care having been taken in their preparation, while the uncolored mapping of Mies Mary Craighead, of Russell's Flat or hx>l, was also meritorious and got the seme grade of honors as the first mentioned. The teaching staff of the school did a wise thing in exhibiting the drawing books and opy books of the vaiious standard*. Be it understood that what were exhibited on the trestles set apart for this purpose were not books specially prepared for the exhibition, but the ordinary every day work books of the school. They were taken just as they came, and placed upon the tables, every schulai'd work in the various classes being shown that room could be found for, ah4 any not shown were withheld, not for want of merit, but'simply for want of room. The exhibits began with the infants and went on to the sixth standard, The writing in the copy books was the subject of much remarks-riot a blot or spot of dirt was to be seen, not an erasure not a single "literal" error, while the letters were all well-formed, and many of the copy Looks showed an excellence of finish and grace of style not much inferior to the head lines they were reproducing. Truly the generation of Ashburtonites under Mr Mayna'a care at present promise at least to be able to write a legible hand. In this connection, Mr David Thomas, at the close of the exhibition madt> aT very complimentary reference to the excellence of the writing work shown. Along with the copy books were exhibited in the same way the drawing books of the pupils, and written notices at the divisions of the various 'standards intimated that the drawing work was taken from lessons givei} oh the bl*ck-bbard. As with the writing, Mr Mayne and hjs staff have reason to be prou?j. of the drawing wijrfc of their pupils. Not the least important part of the exhibition was the needle, work. In, this department the judges were Mesdames W. J, Silcock, Peter Williams, and H. M. Jones. The judges expressed themselves as startled at the excellence of the work. The sewing machine has now come so largely, into use, that special Excellence in fine "white seaW" sewing is less "frequently met with v among the young people thai* it y?aa twenty or thirty years a^Gr-afc, |eas,t ejderly ladies who have trophies, of their own skill to exhibit say so! There was not much of this kind pf work exhibited at the exhibition on Saturday, but all that was exhibited would have held its own anywhere, Miss M, Nevin showed two articles of under-cloth. jng wHch the judges said were so perfect in workmanship that only the most hypercritical could find fault with. These exhibits are singled out for special notice because they were articles of clothing for for* everyday wear, but there were other exhibits equally meriiorous although ill a different jfoc. The Miscjes Ranges showed pittows of wonderfuLjf clever work*nianship, and wsvery well-ntade s cushion. A prize would have been given to these exhibits bit for the fact that competition was restricted under certain conditions tb pupils attending the school, but an award of nifcr.it was'gipn. The Afieges Alcorn exhibited a good many excellent' samples of fine work-in embroidering and drewel work; and in two instances the "good old fashioned suppler made its appearance in the wpik of. thjj sister^ Reid. Jn the department of needlework 1 the entries were more numerous tlhan |h £ny ofher, and while it is pleasing t!o note thjs, and %e ejjcejElence of the'work, we regret that space {pfb,ids a suepial mention of eac|} exhibit, but'Ww we'giyefclie pjjze list. Thora was f» competition in composition for which seven young writers entered, and the Rov. E. A. Scott was judg*» in this department. Much credit is due to the Ashburton Committee. — more especially the subCommittee who had charge of the exhibition—for the success that attended the project,' and also to the teaching staff,' 1 "wha rendered valuable servije in staging the exhibits. Npw that the other Senool Commit 1 tees in 'ttie county know the nature of 'the/ exhibition 1, and jt§ object, and that t}ie young people Jjava learned whafr tfro prdmoterg of the Exhibition waited them tq do, t^e success, of future exhibitions is assured, *nd these will of course ho longer be confined to the pupils of one school, but all will send in exhibits, for it is absurd to suppose that there are not hundreds of clever lads and lasses all over the county whose handiwork will not compare favorably with •. k ■I ' „ v k - ( , v

much that was shown on Saturday. Iu the evening ■ Mr D»vid Thomas said the thanks of all were due to the promoter* of the exhibition, which he looked upon as a decided success, if for nothing else than the opportunity it had afforded so many people of seeing the juperb writing of the Ash burton pupil*. Not only was the 4 writing good, but there was a cleanliness About the books that he had never seen in any other school, and he complimented both teachers ond pupils on tho l«ct. He was pleased to *ee that some of the pupils had been turning their attention to the collection of mineral aaraj lee. The colony had, a great wealth in her mineral resources—resources that were yet undeveloped,—and it would be for the New Ztmlsnders of the future to develope these resources and increase thereby the colony's wealth and further her pros perity. He won 1! like to hour of many of the lads turning their attention to (he study of mineralogy «o that, aa time went on, they couM turn their knowledges acquired by study to account, and there was no saying what they might be able to drag out of those hill* of ours. . That this Exhibition was to be an annual thing went without eaying. and he hoped thac all the pupils in the county would be ex-, hibitors in some way or other at the next, and those that were to follow. After a few other kindly remarks in Mr Thomas's usual happy way, the customary thanks were tendered. The exhibition was attended during the day and throughout the evening by a large number of visitors from the country, while the townspeople very loyally sup* ported it. At intervals selections wire given en the piano by musical friends. PRIZK LIST. The following is the prise list :— Sewing axd Fakct Work—Olaas I.— Prisoilla Chapman, Aahburton,l j Hilda Kidd, do, 2. Class 2;— Mary Collison, Seafield, 1; Tda Smith, Ashburton, 2; . Agnes Anderson, do, 3. Class 3.—Ksthleen Alcorn, Aahburton, 1; Lila Baxter, do. 2 ; Mabel Jones, do, h.e. Class 4.—. Euuice Bickersteffe, ishburton, 1; M*ey Potter, do, 2. Claw 6—Jamesßroadley, i Aahburton, 1 ; Olive MeSdinv do, 2; ' Class 6 —Gertie Meddins, AsMrarton, 1; Hamilton Douglas, do, 2: Ada Smith, - . Ashburton, special; Ethel Proadley, Ash* ! burton, h.c. . ' ' '' ' Kkittino—Class 7.—Alice White, Ash* | burton, J ; Lilie Harrison, do, 2;PrisotHa Rundell, do, h.c. 1 Macrams—Class B.—Matilda Leggct^ i Adhburton, 1. Drawing—Standard Vl.—Frank Han*. r.ihan, Ashburton, 1; George Scott, do, 2. Standard V.—Arthur Pilbrow, Ashbur--1 ton 1 ; Minnie Corner, do, 2. Standard IV.~A<?a Tucker, Ashburton, 'l; Beryl Colyer, do. 2. Standard lll.—Willie Sargent, Ashburton, 1; Hilda Martin. do, 2. Standard IL—Herbert Smith, | Ashburton. 1; Pat Mahoney, do, 2. Standard I.—Douglas Homeisham, Ash* burton, 1; Edith Patching, do, 2. Infant Department.—Albert Sparrow, Ashburton, 1; Bessie Stribling, do, 2. Wmbto- Standard VJ.—Jtannie Reid, Ashburton, 1; Emily Grant, do, 2. Standard V.— Agnes Anderson, Ashburton, 1. Standard IV.—Stanley Homersham, Ash* * burton, 1. Standard lll.—Willie Sar- * gent, Ashburton, 1; Florence Sealy do, 2, Standard ll.—Minnie Smitheraro, Ashburton, 1; Harry Robottom, do, 2. . Composition — Very few exhibits—; prizes awarded to Beryl Colyer and James - Oolyer in their respectvie classes. Maps—Painted Maps.—Muriel Douglas, Ashburton, 1: Ronald Douglas, do, 2. Unpainted Maps.—Muy Craighead, Russel's Flat school. 1. Handiwork—Class I.—W. OlEen, Ashburton, for a wheelbarrow, 1. Class 2.— L. Craighead, Ashburton, for a wheelbarrow, 1. Class 3.—H. Douglao, Abhburton, for a kite, 1. Class 4.- J. Quane Ashburton, for modle engine, 1; for a filterh.c. Class; s.—vJ. Gourdie, Ashburton, for a fire screen, 2. Collections of Minerals.—Alfred and Fred Silcock, Aahburton, 1; George ; Braddell, do, 2. Specwsnsof Bibu's Eggs.—Hastings BraddelJ, Ashburton, I. Paintjngs—For boys under ton years. —Hugh Mavo, Ash burton, X. Pencil Drawings—Class 1. — Kate '■ White, Ashburton, 1; Jane Stevenson, do, 2. CUhh 2. - Edith Patching, Aehhurton, 1; Olive Meddins, do 2. Class 3. ""-■■ Mary Craighead, Iluasel's Flat school, h.c. . BXHIBiTS BY BX-PUPILS (iTOR BXHIBITION ONLY.) Pa inting.—Class I.—lst orderof merit, Harold Curtis ; 2nd order of merit, Edna Douglas j 2nd order of merit for painting from life (horses) Ethefjbnes. ' ' m Drawing .—Class 2.—lst order of merit, . Ethel, Alcorn ; 2nd order of merit, Mary Gertie Sparrow. Point Lace—Class 3, Ist order of merit, Mary Alcorn. Mqontmvluck Work,—Class 4.—rlsfc order of merit, MissAlpqrn. CrevblWork.—CLms4.—h.c, P>oeb§ Ranger,

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EXHIBITION., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIII, Issue 2716, 11 July 1892

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EXHIBITION. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIII, Issue 2716, 11 July 1892

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