Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

How a Charrge of Shot Travels.

When standing within a few yards of the gun's muzzle at the time of discharge, a person would be amazingly astonished were he only able to see the shot as they go whizzing by. Experiments m instanteous photography have proved to us that the shot not only spreads out, cometlike, as they fly, but they string out one behind the other to a much greater distance than they spread. Thus, with a cylinder gun, when the first shot of a charge reaches a target that is forty yards away, the last shot ia lagging along ten yards behind. Even with *he choke-bore gun some of the shot will lag behind eight yards m forty. This accounts for the wide swath that is mown m a flock of ducks on which a charge of shot falls just right. About 5 per cent only of the charge of shot arrive simultaneously at the target, but the balance of the first half of the charge is so close behind that a bird's muscles are not quick enough to get out cf the way, although those who have watched sifcting birds when shot at have often seen them start as if to fly when the leading shot whistled by them, only to drop dead as they were overtaken by the leaden hail.—From Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900915.2.5

Bibliographic details

How a Charrge of Shot Travels., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2518, 15 September 1890

Word Count
228

How a Charrge of Shot Travels. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2518, 15 September 1890

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working