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A Thrilling Exoerience.

I onco let a professional swordsman cut apples m two while I held them on my head and on the palm of my hand, and 111 never do it again. The experience is too thrilling for the plain citizen who is not military m his tastes. I was with a show when the regular assistant of the swordsman went on a strike. The swordsman was m a dreadful fume as he thought of disappointing the crowd of spectators that night. He came behind the scenes at rehearsal and called for a volunteer. !'l'll give £5 to, the man who will hold the apple for me," he said. No one volunteered, and I daringly pufc m my oar. "I'll do ib if you give mearehesrsal." * No rehearsal," he said emphatically ; " it will shatter your nerves so that you'll tremble like an aspen leaf when you come out at the performance." So, when night came I went out, the upper part of my body covered with a thin silk vest. It was. cold, anyway, and I trembled abominably. He saw ifc, but said nothing to me. Iheld the apple on my extended hand: it shook. I could feel it shaking, and I felt ashamed, but I couldn t control the nervousness. I turned away my head ; he made a few rapid feints and I knew by tha applause that the apple had fallen. I didn't feel the blade at all as it cut through. Then I knelt down and he pufc another apple on my neck. I knew this was really dangerous, for if his hand slipped he might decapitate me. I shut my eyes. In a second, which seemed an hour to me, I felt a thin cold line touch my neck, and there was more applause. In that instant I thought of Madame Roland and the guillotine, and came near fainting. He told me to get up and I followed him off the stage, feeding rather dazed, to the dressing room; jt thought I must be cut, the touch of the steel had been so plainly felt, but the looking glass showed me that there was not a mark on me. But; I was awfully pale. ■ The next night we got a regular man to' hold the apple.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900912.2.5.4

Bibliographic details

A Thrilling Exoerience., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2516, 12 September 1890

Word Count
381

A Thrilling Exoerience. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2516, 12 September 1890

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