Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

FRENCH WOMEN.

As married women, they fight the battle of life so well that m numberless instances their clearsightedness, economy, and energy have saved their families from ruin. Their capacity for business and every kind of industry suited to their physical strength has, without doubt, caused a great deal to be expected of them which they might have escaped had they been otherwise -constituted. Thus the wives of small tradesmen very frequently do all the book-keeping m addition to their household duties; the wives of peasants work m the fields from sunrise to nightfall; and the wife of the mechanic, or town labourer, is expected to bring nearly as much money as himself to the house by making, artificial flower making, charing, or some other occupation. But this is not all. It is upon his wife that the town workmen relies when he is out of employment. With all women, solicitude for their children is the grea* incentive to exertion. The Paris workman often profits by this law of nature, and he would probably be worse off if he had no family. It is no rare thing for a French beggar to urge as a reason for helping him that he was no wife to rely upon when he is out of employment.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900905.2.13

Bibliographic details

FRENCH WOMEN., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2510, 5 September 1890

Word Count
213

FRENCH WOMEN. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2510, 5 September 1890

Working