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LOCAL AND GENERAL

It is estimated that 90,000 pianofortes are manufactured every year m London. Hawkes Bay is the potato-land of N«w Zealand this year, the exports and orders booked for shipment to the end of this month totaling 85,500 sacks. According to the census of 10 years ago the foreign-born population m New York was then 478,670. This year it is computed to be 675,000. The health of the once beautiful Empress of Austria has been completely shattered by the tragical death of her son ; she is ageing rapidly, is a martyr to rheumatism, and is no\r leading a secluded life at Wiesbaden. The last issue of the " Americau News paper Directory " avers that no fewer than 767 German newspapers are published m the United States and Canada. Of these 91 are issued daily and 585 weekly. An African craze prevails m Germany The Foreign Office is flooded with applications, largely from army officers, but including all sortsi ot people, asking for Government employment m Africa. Mra Stanley, or the late Miss Dorothy Teunant, is said to be directly descended from Oliver Cromwell, and from her earliest years—so runs the gossip of the hour—-she announced her intention of never marrying any man who had not made a, name m the world. The municipality of Berlin has asked permission of the Emperor to open a public subscription for the erection of a statue m memory of his father, but the authorisation has been refused on the ground that it ia Hits Majesty's intention to erect such a memorial at his own cost. In the ririddle of June last, the city of KJiarkoff, one of the most populous and important m Central Russia, was suffering troiji a water fannnc for eight days. None wan available for baths m the hospital, nor for the extinction of fifes, and the precious fluid being was sold m the streets by the quart for drinking purposes. A man named Mark Cole, a wharf crane driver, was hurt on the Timaru wharf at 2 p.m. yesterday while loading theOolae. He was jammed by a truck against the mooring piles and had both bones of the right arm , broken, the little finger of his left hand crushed, and a flesh wound inflicted inside the right thigh. The Hungarian Chamber of Deputies has refused by 219 votes against B0 to restore to the venerable patriot, Louis Koamith, his rights as a citizen. It the course of the debate M. Tisza mentioned that he was of the same opinion on the subject as the Emperor, who declared last autumn that m his eyes Kossuth had continued to retain the position of a Hungarian citizen. The Newcastle coal-mine owners intend to "boycott" the steamer Jubilee should she continue running m the intercolonial trade during the present labor find capital crisis. The Ellis steamers are run m accordance with the Maritime Council rules and regulations, and are at present reaping a plentiful harvest, having more cargo than can be taken away on each trip. The dispute between Mr Stead and the Northern owners and the Dunedin jockey Club, has boon amicably and honourably settled, and the coinniijb'fciee of the Dunedin Jockey Club have withdraivn the notice to the handicapper to resign or conimenue an action against Mr Stead. Mr Stead lias withdrawn the imputations made against the committee and against the handicapper. Major Merighi, who served with disjunction as an officer m the army of Garibaldi, lis.s committed suicide at Milan. To those who w**i'<; drawn to his side by the report of the revolver with which he destroyed himself his hat words were these : —"I kill myself m order not to reveal a .secret which was known only to Cavor, yktot Rjniriaimel, and myself, and which I have been pleased to divulge." The We'sterfjeld homestead originally th c property of the late' if r Charles Reed, ha s a,ußj6 changed hands. Mr p. Thomas as ag«'nt' UiV Ml' iEfawdo'n,' 'to'"whom i 4 has recently belonged, Jias sold it' to Messrs Todhuntup and Mr Dowdjijg. The property m 2;l(K> acres m extent, adjoins the Hon. J. McLean's Lagmohr estate, and is about ten miles from Ashburton. The price paid has not transpired, but it is understood to be m the neighborhood of £20,000. The Auckland Charitable Aid Board has jus«t adopted the system of sending lists of their p^^.feV* f° the local bodies of the districts)' VfeeuV,? Ifye &4<} proteges hail. The comments pf some memftprs '■'s ibo local jtyo/djps'.on perusing the '"little list." ha-v^ •beqn iuv*,v .emphatic than polite. "" What) that w.oman on the ration 1 list ; why she' is better off than my wi<jj.! " ,jaid one. " That fellow on the'ra.fcLo i v list'; why he is living on his freehold property," saidapo^her It is intended to celebrate the centenary of Lamartine's birth at Macon, hifl Jiata-1 place, on the 2lstOctober next, by a success sion of brilliant fetes. Gounod is composing fy> oratorio for the occasion, and Einilo uuiri*e*i> .La^ Hftt'itten the words and music for a hynHh 'J'ljfew ,i!'in bp a competition for the" host eulogy on'tlje Av/^.l^ poet a»d orator; this; will he publicly' park aj^l (Jm writer crowned with a 1 wreath' of jkuirei ailtl presented with a gold medal. ' Soiiie of the .i».oas menibera of the French 'Aeadeiny wjli i^c part m the proceedings, and"thei-e will be% ttx^j.ct as A 'matter of course ; Lamartine's diaiii'ai)!: '•'■'jiVw^suuit /■puvertuse" will be performed at the Icfcal i t|iea l t,re by the company of the Theatre ! vocalists from the Grand Opera ■ $££ {,9 l^ke part tv the musical entertain* lueut.

The police force has been largely re-in-forced at port Lyttelton, and several special constables have been engaged to preserve order m case of emergency. IVA meeting ot tlie Ashburton m-anch ot the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants will be held at the Templar Hall, Wakanui road, on Saturday next, Mr C. A. Rae, delegate from the Central Committee, will bo present and address the members. An advertisement from the railway department m another column announces the changes to be made m the train services, consequent on the shortage of coal and the diminished general traffic caused by the labor troubles. It will be seen that from Ist September the 7.20 a.m. train from Ashburton to Christchurch and th« 4.15 p.m. train from Chrfetchurch to Ashburton will only run on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays. The eleven o'clock train from Ashburton to Christclmirch will be withdrawn altogether. On the Methveu line the morning train from Methven to Rakaia will only run on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays, the train back to Methven will run on four days of the week, Tuesday being added to the three days already mentioned. The morning train from Rakaia to Methven on Tuesdays has been withdrawn, but the 3.10 p m. train from Methven to Rakaia on Tuesdays will run as usual. A Wellington telegram to a contemporary says that the strike has materially affected prices for stores and groceries. " Talking over the matter with a leading merchant this evening, he informed me that hia town deliveries to-day were larger than on any clay during the past sixteen years. The following leading lines will give some idea of the effect the present trouble is having on articles of daily consumption. Rice within the last two days has advanced £2 per ton. Flour which opened this (Wednesday) morning at £10 10s, closed at night at £13. Oatmeal lias advanced from £10 to £11 10s, and granulated sugar has gone up £2 per ton. Kerosene is firming, and may now be quoted at Is 9d for 150 test oil. Stocks of Auckland sugars are comparatively light just now, but it is understood that shipments a"c on their way per Waihora. A large stock of teas are m the market, and prices are not likely to be materially affected. Potatoes have, howaver, gene «p with a bound, and are realising nearly double what they were last week. Three of the leading firms, Messrs Johnston and Co., Levin and Co., and Turnbull and Co., have given most of their hands a week's notice, as they find it would be difficult to keep their businesses going with the uncertainty of being able to get supplies from other ports and Australia. When to this is addecf that coal is rapidly advancing towards faminejprices, it is evident that the laboring clas»es have a very dismal outlook before them."| Lord Dysart. who comes into £200,000 worth of New Zealand property when he is thirty-five, has just had a welcome home to the Ham estates. It was a great event m the villages of Ham and Petersham, for Ham House has not been the residence of the holder of the title for many years past. In fact, the great house had got into such a state of dilapidation that it has taken two years to get it into good repair, only the interest of the mony being used. Lord Dysart, who is severely afflicted, had two addresses given to him—one from Petersham, the other from the tenants and parishioners of Ham. To both the Earl briefly returned thanks. Lord Dysart entered Hani House by the avenue that is called the "Melancholy Walk," through tee legendary gates, which are only opened once m a lifetime of each Earl. It was through these gates that Charles 11., on an emergency, passed to escape from the Roundheads. There were great festivities m tha evening for Ihe tenants and villagers on the old fashioned "lawn, and a dinner m the hall for those of higher social degree. Lord Dysart ia a Radical of the Radicals m politics. He does not wire for society, but he is passionately foul of music. The Hon. Algernon Tollemacho, who at one time was a squatter m New Zealand and is grand uncle to the youg Ear!, has nowleft Ham House, m a portion of which lie resided, and is' living at Wick House, adjoining on the Terrace at Richmond, At the annual dinner of the London Chamber of Commerce, held on April 30th, Mr Goschen made a speech on fitiahcj, m which the followiug passage occurs:—"l cannot say—whatever my hopes may be— how your admirable efforts after a! Labor Conciliation Board may .succeed. But that they may succeeed, ami bring about such accommodations between capital and labor as the best well-wishers of the country may desire must be the heartfelt wish of every friend of his country. We cannot exaggerate the disasters to all portions of the community from these interregnums of activity which occasionally take place, Tlio.se who know this question best will consider that the interests of labor and capital are not antagonistic. To a great extent they have a common foundation; and when I hear speeches made about the falling oft' of our commerce and the dimunition of our exports, I sometimes wish that I had a mass meeting of working men before me, to whom I could say, ' Look at our. competitors, and »cc whether m the face of this competition capital and labor ought not to make friends m this country.' Fancy, if capital should make labor sluggish or discontented from paying an insufficient wage ! Fancy, if labor should frighten capital by exacting more than capital can afford ! Whichever party presses this matter too far —and it may be pressed too far on either side—on that party resta the responsibility of iinperrilling the commerce and industry of this country, Your efforts, whether they be successful or not, are worthy at least of the consideration of all men who wish f°r tne peaceable, progressive course of our commerce and industry, with a' fair and equitable division of profit between the man who has the money and the man who has the hand and works."

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900829.2.4

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2504, 29 August 1890

Word Count
1,964

LOCAL AND GENERAL Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2504, 29 August 1890

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