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PARLIAMENTARY

HOUSE 6F REPRESENTATIVES. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 20. Public libraries~-£IOOO. Mr Thompson (Marssden) moved to reduce the item, grant towards foundation Workingmen's College and Technical Institute at Dunedin by £550.—Reduction carried by 22 to 16. Lunatic Asylums—£3B,667-—Adopted. Rotorua Sanatorium £1842—Agreed to. The House rose at 2.3 C a.m. The House met at 2.30 p.m. THE GENERAL ELECTION. In reply to Mr Brown Captain Russell said that he had given notice of a Bill to facilitate the holding of the general election speedily, and it would be held as early as possible. THE HUTCHISON CHARGES. Mr Hislop desired to make a statementas to the intentions of the Government with respect to the charges made against *hem by the member for Waitotara. He (Mr Hislop) had informed the House some time ago that he should state what those intentions were as soon as the Government had decided what course it should take. The Government had given the matter full consideration, and had now come to a decision. As to the charges made against the Government respecting the public accounts, he asked permission to lay on the table a memorandum from the Colonial Treasurer, dealing fully with the state of the public accounts since the present Government took office, quoting the daily average kept at the bank, etc., durino that period, and going fully into the whole question. The Government had also considered the personal aspect of the question, and the result was that the Attorney-General, Sir Frederick Whitaker, would bring an action m the Supreme Court, so as to give Mr Hutchison an" opportunity of proving the charges he had made against him. _ Mr Ballance did not know how far Parliamentary privileges were affected by the statement made by the Government. If a member were to be made amenable m a court of law for his speech made m the House it might prove a very dangerous proceeding. Hs now asked whether the Government intended taking any further action m this matter m the House. Mr Hislop said nothing further than what might arise from the report of the Printing and Debates Committee, .Mr Ballance said that several speeches had keen made on thissubject by members on the other side of the House, and ha contended that Mr Hutchison should have a right to answer these speeches. In reply to Mr Taylor, the Speaker said that the House, m his opinion, was strong enough to protaofc itself against any infringement of its privileges if any had taken place. ,111 4 Mr Hutchison said that he had heard Mr Hislop's statement with some satisfaction. The Government had apparently decided that the public chargea should be fought out m the House, and he thought properly so. He was perfectly ready to meet those charges, but had not yet had an opportunity of doing so Ihe three courses referred to by Mr Hislop had at last been explained. The first course was a voyage of discovery to the printing | office; the second was the volume of statistics which was now laid on the table ; and the third was an action m the Supreme Court. He was not at all disconcerted at those courses, nor was he dismayed at the prospect of the action m the Supreme Court. He had never sought to set up the question of privilege, except m so far as it was proper that the dignity of the House should be maintained. . , Mr Hislop said, as to the question ot who would pay Sir Frederick Whitekers leal expenses, the action would be sjmply 1 4fl Bman against man, namely Sir Frederick ! Whitaker against Mr Hutchison, and the Government would take no advantage of their position over the action m any way. The action would have been laid independent of any action that might be taken by the Reporting Debates Committee. The Treasurer's memorandum was allowed to lie on the table* COAL MINES BILL. Tht? second reading of the Coal Mines Act Amendment Bill was agreed to. The House rose at 5.30 p.m. The House resumed at 7..30 p.m. THE EMWOYEBK LIABILITY BILL. The Employers Liability Act Amendment Bill was passed through committee without amendment, JSFew clauses were inserted providing that the jjlagjtamacy of a workman: should not be a tar to compensation on behalf, oi his^ father or mother ; that a workman wight obtain satisfaction for injury even though lie had been aware of the danger of the. machinery with which he had been working ; that a workman shall not be entitled to any compensation against an employer for injury m am where the employer was Ignorant of the dejfeet which caused the injury; that the representatives of a deceased employer may be aped for injury received. THE EDUCATIONAL RESERVES LEASING BILL. The Educational Reserves Leasing Bill was committed and passed with slight amendments. THE TOOMAN LANS GRANT BILL, The Todman Land Grant Bill was committed and passed without mentTHE SHEEP BILL. | The Sheep Bill as amended by the! Joint Live iStock Committee was com-] mitted. , 1 1 i The principal amendments made by I the Stock Committee were that all sheep .should be wool branded forthwith after .shearing, and prohibiting tiw use of any other instrument than a punch m earmarking. , . Clause 46, providing for crossbred or, long woolled sheep to be dipped once a year, was struck out. In clause 75, offences to be prosecuted summarily, Mr Marehant protested against the power to imprison without the option of a fine for offences under this Bill being placed m the hands of two justices of the peace. Ho moved that the words " resident magistrate " be in-: gerfced instead of " two justices." Lout by 30 to 15. Mr Marehant then appealed to ilus Minister of Lands to recast the ckui.se m wdev fchiit the anore serious of Fences may bo dealt with by a R«sidunt Magistrate and the lighter ones 1)V •I«s!bi«as of the Peace. Mf° Richardson suiid that if the Bill ame back from the Legislative Council amended m tJwfc way he should ask the TL.UHO to accept such amendment. \ new clause .pre-waiing the driving of Kheow hv night was wtaxak wt f A lew 4m»* was added proving tf>;vt sl.eep .should to wool branded forthwith after shearing. 7 . „ Pi-ogreusrois reported, aim |' !lu Hi;Uby foae at 1.45 a.m.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900821.2.15

Bibliographic details

PARLIAMENTARY, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2497, 21 August 1890

Word Count
1,046

PARLIAMENTARY Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2497, 21 August 1890

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