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This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LOCAL AND GENERAL

Next year the New Zealand census will be taken.

Queensland has imported an expert to teach the farmers how to make bacon.

The present Parliament expires by ef fluxion of time on the sth October next.

It is reported that wholesale adulteration of food has been taking place m Brisbane. It is said Sir Harry Atkinson's health shows no improvment.

The Parliamentary buildings at Melbourne are to be completed, at a cost of £90,000,

Upwards of 10,000 German families of the colonial agriculturist class have during the last two years emigrated from Southern Russia to America.

A girl named Cecilia Hackett, 18 years of age, daughter of a resident of Copmiuihurat, New South Wales, was burnt to death while attending to a fire m the open air.

The " Fielding Star " says :—The hardships from taxation on settlers are heavy. One young farmer we know of had to pay 3iis last -week to register four dogs.

A fine collection of Maori weapons and other curios has been presented to the Auckland Art Gallery by Sir George Grey.

Persons m the Auckland district who are m indigent circumstances, and who are m receipt of charitable aid, form a list whose names occupy nineteen pages of foolscap.

General Booth is endeavoring to raise £. r)0,000 to establish two "Home Colonies," where the wastrels of modern civilisation will have an opportunity to earn their own broad. The intention is that the colonies, when formed, shall be self-supporting.

The " Age "of the 17th hist, says :—" The draughts match between Mr James Wyllie, the champion of the world, and Mr R. Mar was concluded last night, when the Queensland champion proved the winner. Out of 20 games played Mr Mar won live and Mr Wyllie three, and 12 were drawn. Mr Wyllie has asked Mr Mar to play another match, which will probably take place m about thcee weeks. Mr Mar was a distinguished player m Scotland as a young man, and was all but able to hold his own with Mr Martins, Mr Wyllie's famous old antagonist.

Wednesday's " Rangitikei Advocate" says :—" That there «ho»}d be a reaction m the price of cattle, as indicated at the Sandon sale on Tuesday, isi not a matter for wonder, when we consider how generally the doctrine of Malthus has been applied to them of late years, as well as wholesale infanticide. Nearly all the dairyists m this part of the countiy havya killed more than two-thirds of the calves at birth and given fchein to the piga, for the reason, as one told us, that a pig at three months old was worth moro than a calf at eighteen months, Surely this keeping down the numbers, coupled with increased facilities for freezing beef, should have the effect of bringing cattle to their proper valu§,"

The Rink will be open tomorrow night as usual.

The amount) of primage dirty collected at the several ports of New Zealand during the quarter ended June 30, was £10,771.

Up to date, since the passing of Mr. James Brown's motion to pay a half-penny per head for small birds, the County Council have paid for 2314 birds.

Teacher : " What part of speech is ' but' V Pupil; " ' But' is a conjunction." Teacher: " Correct. Now give me an example of its use." Pupil: "See the goat but the boy. ' But' connects the goat and the boy."

The Winchmore School Committee will be glad to hear that a site has been granted for a school building m their district. The County Council at its nionthty meeting, granted the Education Board's request for a portion of reserve 1401 for the purpose of a school building. •

The County Council have resolved to fill up the vacancy m the Mount Hutt Riding, caused by Mr Jackson's Beat having lapsed through non-attendance. The election will take place before next meeting.

The planking m the North Ashburton and Taylor's Stream bridges having become faulty, tenders are to be advertised for by the County Council for enough timber to •do the needful work of renewal.

A writer,in the National Beview warns colonists who are relying upon stoats to extirpate the rabbits to beware leßt they have exchanged a bad pest for a worse. He states that a pair of stoats will breed four times a year, with twelve young ones at a litter—a rate of increase which may be productive of great danger m the course of a few years.

A farmer from the JOld Country, who recently started m Canterbury, has conceived a new plan of fattening merino wethers which are too wild to remain quiet m small mobs, namely, by hobbling a fore and hind leg, and turning them adrift m a paddock. If this should succeed it will be a fact well worth knowing.

It is understood that the captain of the Kate Tatham, now at Lyttelton, intends to load his vessel by his crew, and .that the permanent railway hands are to be prohibited by the tmion from assisting, and the wharf labourers threaten to strike if the vessel is loaded by her crew and non-union men.

The official examination, at Brisbane, of Earnest Bayliss, insolvent, formerly agent for the Australian Temperance and General Mutual Life Association at Rockhampton and Brisbane, discloses a long record of systematic misrepresentations ifor the purpose of obtaining cash advances. He admitted m evidence that he misappropriated a promissory note for £110 on the representation that he would inherit £10,000 next year. He admitted that he had been twice m gaol m Melbourne.

At the County Council meeting to-day Mr Brown moved the motion of which he had given notice to considerably amend the regulations for traffic over the Ashburton traffic Bridge. The amendment would have had the effect of very largely abrogating the regulations m regard fci traction engines, and allowing them to cross at any hour. Mr Brown urged that it was better that a buggy should be detained for a quarter of an hour than that a traction engine and ten men should be detained for two or more hours, and kept wholly idle. The motion, however, lapsed for want of a seconder.

An Australian contemporary writes:— " The cultivation of ramie for fibre purpose, which, it is said, is destined to take the place of flax to a large extent, is at present receiving considerable attention m various countries, and particularly m Frauce and the United States. The secretary for agriculture (Mr D. Martin) has received a few plants of the ramie, which will be made available for distribution for experimental purposes on application to him. Some time ago the French Government gave a large premium for an improvement m the machinery for the treatment of ramie, bat there is still room for improvement m that direction, and the Government of the United States is giving a 1 good deal of attention to the matter."

It is asserted by those who are intimately acquainted with the peculiarities of the Native race, that they can <lio when they like,' n,nil we have heard'of instances which confirm the assertion. A few days ago, at Turakina a .similar circumstance occurred. An old Maori, one of the ancient identities of the place staying with a Native named Watson, said to one of his friends, "I am going to die to-night." " All right," remarked the other Maori, (> I'll lend you a blanket!" Nothing appcarently ailed the old man. He was rolled np m the blanket, and m the morning was found to be dead, m accordance with his announcement the previous night.

Panitza, the central figure m the Bulgarian conspiracy to dethrone Ferdinand, came to grief through having had a few glasses to much at dinner. Tottering home m a quarrelsome humor, he fell m with a brother officer to whom he owed a grudge. The two officers had high words, and Panitza said " AViUt till to-morrow, and I'll show you what I can do !" The words struck the officer, who followed Panitza and saw him enter a low tavern where a number of officers flocked, with the collai-8 of their overcoats up. There waa a ball at the palace that night. The officer went m, reported to the War Minister what he had seen, and the result was that Panitza and eight accomplices were arrested.

Mr. George Watson, Penrith, recently contributed to the Newcastle " Weekly Chronicle" the following:—ln the churchyard of the parish church of St. Lawrence, Appleby, Westmoreland, is a headstone bearing a remarkable record of longevity. The inscription, which I copied a few days ago, was as follows; * In memory of John Hall of Hoff Row, who departed this life June 19th, 1716 aged 109 years; also of John Hall his son, who died September 18th, 1744, aged 86years, also of John Hall, of Hoff Row, the Grandson, who died March 27th, 1821, aged 101 years. It is to be noted that the united ages of the three John Halls amounted to 296 years, wanting only four years to give an average of a century each, the actual average peing 98 years 8 months.

A Swiss paper published m Paris (the Croxi Fedcrale) gives, from an eye witness, an account of an accident which preceded and led up to the massacre of the Siberian prisoners at Tara. Baron Kolf, the Governor-General of Sibera, visited the women'B prison at Tara. One woman, Kovalskain, m the last stage of consumption, could not rise as the others did on his entrance. He was incensed, and when th« poor woman explained the reason, he ordered her to be sent to Verknio.udinsk, where the treatment is much more severe than at Tara. Four soldiers were ordered to drug her almost naked from her bed into the courtyard. There a miserable fur was thrown over her, and she was placed m a sledge, which set off through the steppes. It waa the depth of winter, and she died before reaching Verknioudinsk,

The following interesting sketch of the career of Hare Pomare, the native chief, who died of asthma m the Wellington Hospital last week, is given m the "Post":—Hare Pomare was a man of very high rank amongst the Maoris, and was the father of Albert Victor Pomare, the Queen's godchild. In 1803, when Hare was iibout 19, lie was taken to England witli his wife and twelve other men and women of high rank—chiefly Ngapuhis from north of Auckland—by an adventurer who intended to make money by taking the Maoris round and exhibiting them. From their first arrival m England they were much taken notice of by the then .Secretary for the Colonies, the Duke of Newcastle, who invited them to his house, where they met numerous lords and ladies, who afterwards invited them.to spend whole days at their respective residences. Hare Pomare was of tall stature, 6 feet 5 inches, and carried himself well ; was affable m his manner, and commanded the attention of all who saw him. A son was born to him m England, and Her Majesty the Queen notified through the Duke of Newcastle, that she would be godmother to the child, and that it was to be named Albert Victor. In London the Queen gave Pomare and his wife a good outfit and paid their passage iv astern cabin, saloon, to New Zealand.' For some time after their return they lived at Hokianga, but of late years have spent most of their time about Otaki, where Hare had inherited land m the Horowhenua block through his mother, who was a daughter af Whatanui, a chief of Ngatiraukavta. Albert Victor Pomare was educated at St Stephen's, Auckland, and is now, m accordance with his own wish, working as a wilor before the mast on a tassel just arrived m England,

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900801.2.5

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2480, 1 August 1890

Word Count
1,959

LOCAL AND GENERAL Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2480, 1 August 1890

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