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Leprosy Among the Maoris.

The report by Dr Ginders on leprosy among the Maoris at Taupo and Rotorua has been laid on the table of the Hon.se of Rspresentatires. His conclusions are that the disorder known to the Taupo and East Coast tribes as "ngere-ngere," to the Ngapuhi and Northern tribes as " puhipuhi," and to the Wanganui and Western tribes as " tuwhenua," is one and the same disease, and is true leprosy. "No one," the rereport adds," who has seen leprosy could possibly mistake the symptoms presented by the two cases inspected. The general consensus of opinion amongst the Maoris is that the disease first appeared on this Island at Hauraki sometime during the latter half of the seventeenth century. Dr Ginders thinks ii, may be regarded as true that it was probably introduced by the marooning of a leper from a ship, possible a whaler, near Hauraki. The term " Wero ngerengere" is the term applied t:> the art of communicating the disease by puncture or inoculation. In

all probability the worst cases have arisen from inoculation, either accidental or premeditated, experience showing that it is not infectious or contagious m the ordinary sense. Dr Ginders concludes by saying that complete segregation of those affected would probably stamp out the disease m a few years.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900801.2.10

Bibliographic details

Leprosy Among the Maoris., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2480, 1 August 1890

Word Count
215

Leprosy Among the Maoris. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2480, 1 August 1890

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