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The Dandelion.

A most determined plant is the dandelion, and gardeners especially wage unequal war with it. Yet the plant is one that is appreciated for its virtues, not only by the schoolboy, who collects it for his tame rabbits, but by more important members of the community. Were it not that it grows so well and universally, and is so readily obtainable no doubt it would be more highly valued as a table vegetable than it is with us. The leaves make capital greens when young and fresh. Then, how many nowadays drink dandelion coffee without appreciating the fact that they may as well make it as buy it ? A friend has recently informed us that he finds the home made article somewhat more bitter, but certainly more useful than the purchased. All that is required is to dry the roots and grind them up, when the infusion becomes a beverage that is pleasing to many, and cf great service to that section of our animal economy of which so little is yet known —the liver.—W. j Anderson Smith.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900716.2.12

Bibliographic details

The Dandelion., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2466, 16 July 1890

Word Count
180

The Dandelion. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2466, 16 July 1890

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