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TEN MONTHS' SUFFERING IN A HOSPITAL.

There is an old saying that physicians are a class of men.who pour drugs, of • which they know little, into bodies of which they • ' 'know less. This is both true and untrue at 0 the same time. There are good and poor lawyerß, and good and poor doctors. The trouble with these medical gentlemen aa a profession is that they are clannish and not lore pay,* by then- frequent failures, the ■penalty ot refusing Instruction unless the teacher bears their own "Hall Mark.' 1 • J An eminent physician—Dr Brown-Sequard, «f Pari3—states the fact accurately, when he 1 says T" The medical profession are sojbound np in their Wlf-confiaence and conceit that ,tney allow the diamond truths of science to Wjpicked up by persons entirely oiitside iKeir'ranks. We give a most interesting incident, which illustrates this important r "truth. •"''','.', i )<!' The "Concordia," ; of the Donaldson Line sailed from Glasgow for „; ; Bal*inioro in 1887, having on board as afire- " man a man named Bichard Wade, of Glasgow. ', • H« had be«n a fireman for fourteen years on Various ships sailing to America; China, and India. He had borne the hard and exhausting labor, And had been healthy and strong. On [ tne trip we now name he began for the first time Jto 'feel weak and ill. His appetite * failed,- and''he 'suffered from drowsiness, • (heartburftj a bad taste in the mouth^ and costiveness and-irregularity of the ,bowels. j Sometimes when 'at work hehad attacks of „-, giddiness, but supposed it to be caused by the heat* of the fire room. . Quite often he - jtaSj sick and felt like vomiting, and; had some pain in the head. Later during the passage he grew worse, and when the »hip reached Halifax he was placed hi the Victoria' Genewl Hospital, and the ,ship ;i wiled away without him., The house ■ iurgeon gave him some powders to nto,p the vomiting, and the next day, the visiting Ithysician igivre him a mixture to take every our honra. Within two days Wade was so much .worse, that the doctors stopped both he powders and the mixture. A month ; .; pftssed,, the poor fireman getting worse \ and Then came another doctor, who was to be'visiting physician for the next five ;r months. " He'gave other medicines, but not Vmuok relief. Nearly all that, time Wade ; 'Muffered great torture; he digested nothing ''•>•' throwing up all he ate.'- There was terrible pain in the bowels burning heat in the . throat,:(heftrtburn, and racking -headache. s ' k 'The patient was now taking* mixture every fburliours, powders, one after each meal to digest the food j, operating pijjp one ,every !X sight, and temperature pills two each night ;fto ' stop ' !'the cold sweats. If drugs .could curb, him at all, Bichard had '-'- an idea that he took enough to doit. ;But if .on the other hand r pleurisy set in and th* ■•■>'.doctor,l took ninety ounces of matter from hit right side and then told him he was sure to '■;"„ die... Five months more rolled by and' there , uo .wa» another change of visiting pfcysiciansh ,f!The,new one gavei Wade a .mixture whicahe said made him t.rem hie like a'leaf on tree. ,-, At this crisis Wade's Scotch bloodasserted ;' Itself. , He'refused to stand any more dosing, ;li andtaldthe doctors that if he must die ho ■/'could die as well without them as with them. >f> ;By this'time a cup of milk would turn sour "•"a& his'stcmachyand lie therefor days. (Our iff friend from Glasgow was like'a, wreck on a shoal, fast going to pieces. We will let , * him tell, the j rest of, his (experience in the •, tfrords jn.iWhjch he ioommunicated it to the press. ~ " m '■<;,,:•• : : » He say«: "When I was in this staf!e a lady whom I had,never seen came to the hospital and talked with me. She proved to 1 bo an angel of mercy, for without her I should not now be alive. She, told me of a medicine called 'Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup,' and brought me a bottle next day. I (Started with it, without consulting ithe doctors, and'to only a few days' time I was „,,, .out of bed calling for. ham and eggs for ' , k J>redkfast. From that'time keeping on with: .Mother Seigel's great remedy^' I got well „.,/ fast, and was soon able to leave the hospital . ; and come home to Glasgow. Ii now feel as „->if I-was in another world, and have no -r illnees of any kind." • ' \ „- The above facts are calmly and impartially stated, and the reader may draw his own . conclusion. We deem it best -to use no names although Mr Wade gave; them in his ■! original deposition. His address is No 244, Stobcross street, Glasgow, where letters will reaoh him. -

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900627.2.16.3

Bibliographic details

TEN MONTHS' SUFFERING IN A HOSPITAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2452, 27 June 1890

Word Count
785

TEN MONTHS' SUFFERING IN A HOSPITAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2452, 27 June 1890

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