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LOCAL AND GENERAL

A violent outbreak of leprosy has taken place among the Hokianga Maories, and Government officers are inquiring into the matter.

The Rimutaka" with mails arrived at Hobart last night, and sails for Port Chalmers at 6 o'clock to night.

Mr S. Alexander's three-year-old colts Investigator, by Cadogan—Deceit, and Golden Hope, by Burlington—Fable, have been purchased by Mr F. Paneti, and left Ashburton yesterday on their way to Australia.

The Christchurch Dairymen's Associatipn urge that the result of analysis of all samples of milk taken by the Inspector should be made public, that they may see that genuine milk is vended ; and in justice to the dairyman, that he may not be under the ban of suspicion by the result being withheld.

In a table recently circulated in England a great black column to the left rejircsented £13(J,00l),O00 spent in the United Kingdom in intoxicating drink, as compared with bread, £70,000,000; butter and cheese, £35,000,000 ; milk, £30,000 ; sugar, £25,000,000; tea, coffee, and cocoa, £20,000,000 : rent of houses, £70,000,000; rent of farms, i'b'o,ooo,ooo ; coal, £15,000,000; woollen goods, £4b',000,000; cotton goods, £14,000,000; linen goods, £6,000,000 ; education, £11,000,000; and Christian missions of all kinds, £1,050,000. -

The quarlerly summons meeting of Court Ashburton, A.0.F., was held on Wednesday evening last. There was a good muster of members. Officers for the next half year were nominated, and sundry other business transacted. Receipts for the evening were sonething more than £24. The C.R. closed the Court at about 10.45 in the usual way, after which refreshments were handed round and som<j capital songs and recitations were given, and a pleasant !)plf hour- spent. At the next meeting the election of officers will take place.

The death of Dr Franz •Delitzseh, at Leipzig, removes from the world one of the most learned Hebrew scholars of modern times. Dr Delitasoh was 77 years old, and had been a professor for forty years—first at Erlaiigon and afterwards at Leipzig. His greatest work, perhaps, wits that ou the "Psalms"; but his "Genesis/ "Proverbs," and "Isaiah " were ail monuments of learned and masterly exposition. Delitzseh was the greatest champion of orthodoxy and of the older conservative criticism in" any of the German Universities ,- buth before his death he modified his yews on the Pentateuch, neccptingsonie of the views of the modern :i:\-) '.now radical critics.

! "i-i'e is now to be seen in the shop window

■■ \\-ws ■). iSealy and Co., East street, a collection of apples showing some of the sorts yowii at the nurseries, Riverbank, that will re'xiv imrv^tioi) \>y any one who fion tempi ile" pl?'nbi:i™ fruit plants. There are upw:ir-ls <X fifty different kinds shown, all \alu:ibic. long keeping sorts. For size, color, and general excellence they are by far the finest that have been shown in Ashburton this season.—(Advt.)

A branch of the New Zealand Postal an Telegraphic Officers' Society lias been formed in Christchurch.

Yesterday afternoon Detective O'Connor" Christchurch, arrested a man named Albert Norman upon a charge of robbery at Palmerston North on August Bth last. The pawnbroker's shop of Solomon Abrahams was broken into and a number of watches, alberts, and rings were stolen, to the value of £100. Suspicion was directed to accused, vho has been in Christchurch about three .veeks. The police believe that the accused disposed of most of the jewellery in South Canterbury. Lord -Cadogah deserves .the. gratitude of the public for generously offering the Guiness Trustees a valuable plot of freehold land in Marlborough road, Chelsea, as a site for improved dwellings for the very poor of that district. The value of "the land is something like £40,000—a magnificent gift indeed, and the Earl, remembering the good old truth Us dat, gui cito dat, has bought but his own lessee so that the land may be immediately available for the charitable purpose of the fund. Trials of the latest express compound locomotive of the North-eastern Railway on the 125 miles between Newcastle and' Edinburgh show remarkably high speeds. A train of- 32 carriages, having a total weight of-270 tons," was run between Newcastle ajidrßerwick, a distance of 67 miles, in 78 minutes.. In "another trial, with a special trtun of lfrcarriages. the unparalleled speed of about 90 miles an hour was obtained. The highest speed,: as meaaufejL-by stopwatch, was just over 1^ mile a minute., _ 1 At Liverpool assizes, William" Pearson, Elizabeth Pearson, and Sarah Bray were charged with causing the deaths of two children, May and Rosina Oldfield, by systematic neglect. The ■ children were illegitimate daughters of a widowof means named Oldfield,. residing at Birkdale, and had been entrusted to the prisoners to nurse. They,had, it was alleged, been treated with such systematic neglect as to cause their death. Oldfield recently married ■ again. The Pearson's were found "Guilty" and Mr Justice Mathew sentenced .them — William Pearson to penal servitude for seven years, and his wife for five years.

In Chambers at Christchurch yesterday morning Mr Justice Denniston dismissed, with three guineas costs, a motion to commit Mr W. H. Spackman, solicitor, to prison for contempt of Court, for having, as was alleged, written to two' persons who.had made-affidavits as to character of Mrs W. Duncan, in the case of D.ancan'.v Duncan, requesting them to furnish the name of their solicitors that he might serve them with a writ for slander. Mr Spackman made an affidavit that the letters did not refer to the statements in the affidavits, but to others made previously ■ " ...

Another pitiful cose of destitution was discovered yesterday in Christchurch. A woman, nearly 70 and a cripple, and her daughter, aged 40 and an invalid, were found in a cottage in Antigua street with no furniture except an old bedstead and a few rags of bedding. They had no food, and had not tasted meat for two months. The landlord turned them out for not paying rent, but another woman allowed them to occupy the small cottage. They stated they had applied for charitable aid, but had*not received any. The Press of Philadelphia, reporting the arrival at that port recently of the Rappahannock, says she is the largest wooden vessel afloat. She was built at Bath, Maine, and cost 125,000d01. Her dimensions are 287 ft long, 48Jft beam, and her total tonnage

3053 net. In the construction of the ship 700 "tons of Virginia oak and 1,200,000 ft of Virginian pine timber were used. The Rappaljannock is the heaviest sparred ship that ever cai'ried t\\e stars and stripes. Her main-mast is SQft long, and 38gin, in diameter; the foremast 13 38f p long, and 38in. in diameter; the maintopmast, 58ft; the maintop-gallant mast, 71ft. The ship h;is astoel bowsprit) which is an innovation. Her spread of canvas will be 15,000 yards. Speaking at the meeting of the Association for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals,

held at Christchurch on Thursday evening, Uishop Julius said that most of the cruelty to animals arose no doubt from ignorance or dull perception, which had to be dealt with by education, which he took to be the first and most important and most valuable work of the Society. Of course there must be a line drawn somewhere, and the difficulty ■vvas to know whore to draw it h\ respect to Qruelty to animals; and they must remember, as well a-j show they remembered, that it was just as cruel for a rich man to indulge in the cruel sport of pigeon-shooting as for the eostermonger to "belabor his poor donkey." Aii extraordinary feat was performed by a man named Fuller, a porter at Billingsgate Market, lately. He made a bet that he would jump from London Bridge tied in a sack, his only stipulation being that he should have a knife —which he was not to open until he touched the water—with ■yyhich to rip open the sack. He and a few of his friends accordingly proceeded to London Bridge at three o'clock. He was tied jn a sack, and then he immediately jumped iiito the water. He succeeded in opening the sack, and it was not long before he appeare lon the surface of the water. He was then picked up by some men who were waiting for him in a boat and convfiye 1 siteiy io shore. The "Gazette" notifies that New Zealand war medals have been issued to—William McKechnie, Lieutenant Now Zealand Militia; H. J. Webber, Assistant Surgeon Taranaki military settlers; Robt Cunningham, Sergeant New Zealand Militia; Peter Loftus, Sergeant New Zealand Militia ; Joel D. Isaacs, Private No. 5 Company Taranaki military settlers; William Linton Beloc, Trooper, No. 2 Troop, Colonial Defence Force; Richard Hart, Constable, No. 3 Division Armed Constabulary ; George Lindsey, Private No. 6 Company Taranaki military settlers ; William Nichols, Private No. 2 Company Taranaki Rifle Volunteers, ami No 3 Company Taranaki military settlers ; Benjamin Gollop, Private New Zealand Militia; Wm Bayley, Private New Zealand Militia ; Wm Vercpe, Private No. 1 Company Taranaki Rifle. Volunteers : Rey, J. Elmslie, Chaplain New Zealand Volunteerf, Talmage must make more money than other pastor in the universe. His salary from his congregation is £3000 a year; while his income from the platform is twice that at least. He gets "besides £2500 from a single firm for the advance publication of his sermons, which are transmitted all over the world, a cheque for £1250 as editor of a religious jeurnal; and also coins silver from Friday evening lectures, which are " syndicated" in innumerable newspapers, both religious and secular, from the royalties on his books and from his odd literary and journalsitic contributions, to say nothing of his marriage fees, which are very considerable. An idea of Ins value to managers may be gained by the fact that shortly before he set sail from Europe recently he was offered £12,500 for a series of lectures, the tour and dates subject to his own convenience, and of Dr Talmagc's prosperity, on the--other hand, in that he could afford to refuse the ofFer. Writing of the prospects of the potato m.irkei. < I ■' n ' ■■ ■ '' and Co. (limited), say : —-■.■-. ■ : > the yield this year in Victoria would lead us to expect a large increase oir last year's production,'but inasmuch as the return upon which this estimate is based, must have been furnished by the farmers prior to the period of drought which so injuriously affected that colony's crop, it is probable actual yields will prove to be considerably less than the offical figures .'■ ■■ .~" ■■■' ■■"!;.- '--y-y it, greatly in-

■■■.-,. ". ..,',"■:.■.,■ ;.-. That there is a very material shortage this year in New Zealand may now may be accepted as a fact. The official estimates of the season's crop in

thq chief potato growing country of the colony show a deficiency of 12,000 tons, or about 63 per cent compared with last year, whilst reports from other districts would lead us to expect a. ■ :■.: I:.."" 1" —adueed yield there also. As- i ■ ". of the New

Zealand crops, shipments from the North Island have been greatly worm-eaten and inferior, but the few consignments from South Island so far as to hand have been fully up to the average standard. Advices from Tasmania also confirm the earlier reports as to light crops being the rule there, though the quality of most of the shipments to date would seem to indicate that this season's crop will be fully equal to last year's in that respect. Having regard to all these facts, we conclude that we may reasonably expect values to rule at about present rates through, out the current year.

Quite a crowd of persons gathered in front of the New Zealand Clothing Company's Ashburlon liranch on Friday evening and during to-day, attracted l>y the display in the window s. Mr Webber, ' the local manager, has obtained the life-size wax figure of Sir Julius Vogol exhibited by the Company ;ib the Dunedin Exhibition. This figure has been clad in Mosgiel tweed of fashionable cut and make, for which the company is famous. In addition to the figure of Sir Julius there arc two life-size figures of youths neatly attired in genteel costumes, and the well-selected and varied stock 01 the liranch is displayed to the best advantage, giving the windows the attractive .appearance only to be found in large centres of population.

A very pleasant gathering took place at RaVaia on Friday eveniug) when the members of the Rakaia Assembly Dance Committee met to bid farewell to Mr J. F. McCarthy who is leaving for Timaru, having occupied the position of Railway Telegraphist here, for the last few months. Mr McCarthy being a musician, has very generously supplied the music foi the dance during the winter, and though his sojourn at Rakaia has been very brief j he has'made many friends, who will be sorry to part with him. He was presented .with a small memento, and all present joined in wishing him success in the new position which he is to occupy.'

The belief which some people entertain as to the existence of the far-famed sea serpent has received a fresh impetus from, the report made ti>y the passengers on board the s.s. Victorian on her last trip between Melbourne ani Sydney. They solemnly state that just after the vessel had passed Gabo Island the sea serpent appeared disporting itself in the water astern of the Bteamer. The marine monster was " fully 80ft long and sft in girth, being black or nearly black in color. Strange to say the master of the s.s. Victorian, Captain Lookyer, also saw the creature,, and corroborates the statement made by the pas■engers. Perhap3 an expedition will be formed for the capture of the sea serpent, and will, no doubt, be as successful as the

one which, headed by a. learned professor, recently started from Melbourne with the laudable intention of capturing and presenting the far-famed Australian bunyip to tbe "Melbourne Zoological Gardens.

Mr Richardson was too canny to put his head into " chancery" for the gratification of the splenetic peculiarities of disappointed and aoured colleagues. He, therefore, did not repeat phe Fergus experiment, but con} tented himself with saying that " the policy of the Government was a policy of settlement and progress, of common sense ■ and prudence, a policy of paying their way, of pausing in respect of railways, and of pushing on roads, a policy that could be pursued without borrowing." In fact Mr Richardson asked his hearers to believe that the Government's policy is one of P'3, if not of peace and plenty. Most people, however, deem it to be a thimble and pea policy ; but Mr Richardson reversed the usual procedure of other jugglers, and adroitly hid the thimble, possibly because the mention of it would have spoilt the alliteration of his peroration. Mr Richardson might have said that the policy of his Government was of similar excellence to that of every other Government that has ever had an existence. Unlike poor Mr Fergus, Mr Richardson ought to be accorded a magnificent reception when he returns to Wellington. If telling the truth be worthy of Ministerial condemnation and abuse, doing the other thing ought to be signalised by the greatest posible display of affectionate regard of which Ministers are capable. A sacrifice of principle, even in politics, is worthy of some sort of cheap recognition from those for whose benefit the sacrifice is niade. But would it not have answered the Ministry's purpose better if Mr Richardson had referred jug hearers and the colony to the Sermon on the Mount for a description of the Government policy.—" Oamaru Mail."

SANDER AND SONS' EUpALYPTI EXTRACT.—In-protection of the world wide fame our manufacture has acquired'all over the globe, we publish the following .-— Hazard, M.D., Professor of General Pathology and Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System, says in an editorial published in the "Clinical Record":—" We have examined half-a-dozen specimens of different manufactures ; the preparation, of Sander and Son 3 was the only one that prove/I he reliable and corresponding tq scientific tests." ■Another concqc.tion called " Refined Extract of Eucalyptus" has made its appearance since. This product stands, according to Dr Owen, foremost in causing injurious effects. That gentleman communicates, at a meeting o| the Medical Society of Victoria, that a child living at Fitzroy became mos^ seriously in disposed through its use. In another case a" lady states on the strength of; (Statutory declaration that she suffered cruelly from tle effects of the same concoction. To guard t'.ie high reputation of our manufacture we feel warranted in expo ing the above facts, and desires the public to exercise care and p-ecaixtion when buying, ' SANDER and yONS—(Advt,) ' 7

Henry Pearce, a carpentej, sued Pan Shirley, Sergeant of Police, in the Dunedin Supreme Court yesterday, claiming £300 d images for wrongful arrest, imprisonment, and assult. The statement of claim set forth that plantiff was imprisoned for one hour ; that defendant without reasonable cause,

assultod him, and arrested him and charged him with a breach of the peace, under which charge he was imprisoned. The defence was : (1) That on the date referred to the plaintiff was publically making certain charges against George Daniels in the presence of a number of people ; (2) that the defendant asked him to come to the police station, and formulate such charges for investigation ;'(3) that plaintiff went voluntarily with defendant to the station, and remained there voluntarily for some time, stated the charges to Sergeant O'Neill, and then left the station, and (4) further that do notice in writing of the action or its caure had been given to defendant. After hearing evidence and counsel the jury returned a verdict tor the defendant, the question of costs being reserved.

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2441, 14 June 1890

Word Count
2,929

LOCAL AND GENERAL Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2441, 14 June 1890

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