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LOCAL AND GENERAL

Arthur Rothschild has sold his famous collection of postage stamps for the sum of £12,000.

St. John's Lodge, No. 1858, E.G., will hold an emergency meeting in the Hall at 7.30 this evening, and not at 7 p.m. as previously advertised.

The raw flesh of some varieties of edible fish contains a poisonous substance, which is, however, completely destroyed by cooking.

O'Donovan Rossa's twenty years of banishment from Ireland will expire next year, and he will then make a visit to his native land. The Charitable Aid Board, Christchurch, have given relief in 484 cases during the past month. The practice of interviewing applicants for relief lias been discontinued.

Scotchmen, banqueting in London, are now entertained with nrasic of real northern bagpipes played into a phonograph and sent down to London by express.

On the summit of Ben Lomond may be seen the smallest tree that grows in Britain. It is known as the dwarf willow, and is when mature only about two inches in height.

A Vienna baker is advertising ,his business by putting a gold ducat in one loaf out of every thousand that he bakes. The people in the poor suburb where his shop is situated fairly fight to buy the loaves.

The almost entire absence of wind for a long time past in Tokomairiro district (says the " Bruce Herald) has been phenomenal. There are pieces of paper lying on the roadsides which have maintained the same position for fully six months. There has not been such a calm period ■ tot at least nine years,

Marwood the famous English hangman, died a bankrupt. He was a shoemaker by trade, but speculated considerably. Among his assets is a bill of £25 against the City of Dublin for the hanging of the murderers of Cavendish and Burke.

A watchmaker named Georing, of Ottersen, near Hamburg, Germany, is the oldest veteran of the Napoleonic wars. He reached the age of 150 years on March 13. In 1812 he took part in the retreat of the French over the Beresina and witnessed Napoleon's flight from Russia.

The blue ageratum, which is cherished in England as a border flower,' was introduced into Ceylon by an English lady, where it spread so rapidly, running wild in the island, that it now costs more than £250,000 annually to keep it down in the coffe plantations.

A popular movement ia on foot at London, with good prospects of success, to make up a ladies eight-oared team to race over the university course. There is a considerable purse and the entries are open to all girls under the age of twenty-five, irrespective of rank. ,

•At the Christchurch Hospital Board yesterday, Mr R. Tarish, one of the members, vigorously protested against a nurse in the Hospital having spoken of some patients as paupers. He considered that in a hospital supported, by public ■ money no such distinctions should be~ made.

The Commission in charge of the improvement of the* city of Rome has uneaithed great quantities of lead water-pipe, each plainly stamped with the name of the owner of the house, the year of the plumbing, the names of the Consuls of that year, and that of the reigning Emperor.

Tbe body of a man has been found floating in Saltwater River, 'Victoria. • Some £23 was found in his' pockets, a deposit receipt for £500 in the Commercial Bank, and .a. watch and chain in hia waistcoat pocket," the watch bearing the following inscription:— " To Edward Brennan, from his loving wife, Gertie." The body' has not yet been identified.

The Canterbury Jockey Club have arranged their programme for next season. The added money is increased from £7025 to £7635. The Great Autumn Handicap is raised from £300 to £500, and several races have been re-arranged. The club will shortly provide for a race, value £2000, to be run at the Autumn Meeting, 1893, over 6 furlongs, and under somewhat similar conditions to the present Challenge Stakes.,

In 1888 one of the Workmen employed in excavating the canal on the Isthmus of Panama took a ticket in the lottery which was got up for the benefit of that undertaking. About a year afterwards he quitted the Isthmus, and his present whereabouts is altogether unknown. His ticket entitles him to the first prize of £10,000, and that sum lies unclaimed in the French bank which received the funds subscribed.

The "Musical Monthly," says : "Another big band contest is being arranged for in Dunedin, and a large sum has already been promised. Mr William Will has been requested to act as supervisor, and should he accept the arduous task, it is safe to say that with his recent experience to aid him, the position could not be in better hands. Next month we shall be able to announce details in connection with the scheme."

The Alpha Martini-Henry Rifle Club, with representatives of t other clubs, including Oamaru, ha 3 passed resolutions requesting the Government to supply each member of a rifle club with 250 rounds of ammunition free per year, charging 5s per 100 beyond that number; to allow members of rifle clubs to compete for the Association's champion belt; and that rifle clubs provide themselves with uniforms.

A workman employed at an American hotel surprised a bystander by wanning a kettle of coffee in an original manner. He dug ji hole in a pile of sand, placed a lump of lime in it, and sprinkled some water on the lime.. Ho then put the kettle on the mixture and banked up some sand round it. In a few minutes lie announced to a companion that the coffee was a "bilin." Here was a practical chemist in a humble way.

The Wellington correspondent of a. .Southern contemporary says :— " Thd rumours which the Press Association sent you last week«appear to be well fqundgd. It is now believed, however, that Mr Mitchelson will lead the House, and that Sir Harry, Atkinson will not resign. One point of difference in the Cabinet is the Public Works Department, which one or two Ministers wish to particularly restore."

Joseph Gillott was a Birmingham working jeweller in 1830. One day he accidentally split one of his fine steel tools, and being suddenly required to sign a receipt, not finding his quill pen at hand, he used the. split tool as a ready substitute. This happy accident led to the idea of making pens of metal. It was carried out with secrecy and promptitude, Tlje pe.ns of Gillott became famous, and he died recently immensely wealthy, and, withal, was extremely benevolent.

A London cartman, who had been employed for fourteen years by a firm of fruit dealers, was recently engaged in hauling a cargo of oranges from the wharf to the warehouse of his employers. While so doing, he committed the heinous offence of eating two of the oranges. Fqr this he was at once arrested, tried, convicted, and sentenced to a month's imprisonment. The Magistrate enlarged upon the enormity of the offence, involving, a3 he said, a M§erious breach of trust."

Mr D, Mahoney, of Titravu, has sent a couple of dogs .to, compete at the principal coursing fixtures in Victoria. The pair are woi'thy representatives of Mr Mahoney's kennel. Zara, by The Smoker—Louise, won the All Aged Stake at Ashburton last week and was winner of the Waterloo Plate at the last Dunedin meeting. Ringer, by Ring-wood^-Zo^beda, the other of the pair, won the Inaugural Stakes at the 1888 meeting in Dunedin, which' filled' with 58 dogs,' and carried off the Champion Stakes last year.

It will be in the recollection of the public that my collection of apples shown in Mr Clayton's shop in East street, being sixty-six varieties, and also those which took two first awards at the Dunedin Exhibition and various other places, was pronounced to "be the largest and best ever shown in the Ashburton county. I would draw then attention my advertisement elsewhere. As unly work on blight-proof stocks than which n other stocks can be relied upon, the roots of my apple trees do not require to' be washed before sending out. James Porter,'nurseryt man, Allenton. —(Advt,)

Certainly the Most Effective MEDICINE in the woria is SANDER and SONS' EUCALYPTI EXTRACT. Test its eminent powerful effects in Coughs, Colds, Influenza, etc. ; the relief is instantaneous. Thousands gave the most gratifying testimony. Read this certificate:—" 24th April, 1885 — Messrs Sander and Sons, —It is with the greatest of pleasure that I testify to the excellence of your Eucalypti Extract. Having had inflammation of the bon& of the leg, which came on after a severe attack of low fever, I was attended by Dr J. Boyd, who had made strenuous efforts to save my leg, but Avithout success. He found it necessary to amputate nry limb. Having heard in the meantime of the wonderful cures worked by the Eucalypti Extract, I obtained a bottle, and the extract had not been applied more than an hour when I began to feel greatly relieved. After applying the extract every four hours for nine or ten days it was out of all danger. I would persu.ade all who may be effected with any such disease to give the Eucalypti Extract a trial, and I am convinced that they will find it the most wonderful of medicines.—Yours etc., E. J. Curkow, Wattle street, Sand hurst.—(Advt.) 5

Holloway's Piias,—lnvalids stractodd by indigestion and discouraged *hi their search for its remedy should make a trial of this never-failiug medicine. A lady, long a martyr to dyspeptic tortures, writes that Holloway's Pills made her feel as if a burden had been taken off her. Her spirits, formerly low, have greatly improved; her capricious appetite has given place to healthy hunger; her dull, sick, headache has departed, and gradually so marvellous a change been effected that she is altogether a new creature, and again fit for her duties. These pills may be administered with safety to the most delicate, They never act harshly, nor do they ever induce weakness; they rightly direct dsran^d ; a. d control excessive, action,

MJELBOTJIfcINE NOTES. [from our own correspondent.]

Melbourne, June 3. No stronger condemnation of the system of paying members of Parliament for their services could be furnished than the spectacle presented by the attitude of the House itself. The want of confidence motion is a commendable thing in itself, because it has furnished the much-needed opportunity required by members to criticise the financial policy of the Government, and to lay bare the scandalous mismanagement of the - railways. It was right and proper that Ministers should be confronted with a catalogue of their misdeeds in these two important particulars, and that they should beplainly told what hon members and the public think of them. But that done, enough had been said. The Government would have received a fair warning, that if they did not amend their ways they would be discharged, and that, as we have already •seen, would have been quite sufficient to check the vagaries of which just complaint has been made- For the nothing .would be pained and a great deal would be lost .by turning the Government out just. Nothing would be gained by replacing one' set of incapables by another set not a whit. more competent, whilst much would be lost by the inevitable postponement of important legislative consequent upon a change of Ministers. - :

But the debate is calculated to teach a lesson upon the payment of members system. A bonus of £300 a year and other valuable privileges is a strong temptation for a certain class of people to push themselves into the House who would much better advance the interests of the country by remaining outside its walls. The professional politician—the man who goes into politics as a means of gaining a living or of increasing an existing small income, is not a desirable citisen in any country, and, unfortunately, this class exists in Victoria. In order to wreck a Government, and better themselves by picking up the scattered plums, there men in the House who would throw public questions to the winds, whilst there are others, as shown by their speeches, who have need to' go to school a few years before setting themselves up up as legislators.

The opening of the Swan Hill railway, to be followed in two months by the placing upon the waters of the upper Murray of a splendid steamer, will open up to excursionists and pleasure seekers a new excitement. Hitherto an overworked Melbourne man, or an overworked man from any other part of Victoria, did one of three things whenever he could secure a holiday. He tried to get away to the seaside. The choice within the colony was not very extensive. Queenscliff, St. Kilda, Brighton, and the rest of the places with which weareallsofamilar, and of which we have become so weary, made up the catalogue. The favored few who had more time to spare, and who could command more money, elected a trip to Tasmania. Fewer still—men with more time and more money—adventured as far as New Zealand. The Lake district in Gippsland was not forgotten either, but now, we have brought within reach a new attraction to enjoy which does not demand very much time nor any very great amount of money.

The direct line to Swan Hill is now open, and, in seven- or eight weeks time a long tract of the picturesque banks of the upper Murray will become accessible in seasons of the year. The scenery on either bank of the river is simply beautiful. There is the stretch from Swan Hill to Wentworth - athriving spot on the New South Wales side of the river—then from Wentworth to Mildura—not a very long run, but opening up some exquisitely beautiful river scenery. Where this is enjoyed from the deck of a steamer splendidly appointed in every respect, the pleasure is a real one ; and especially where we are being conveyed to a spot the name of which has already become a household word in more places than Victoria. I predict that during the coursa of next summer, it will not be one party, but several that vail be made up for an excursion to that place. Then, for those who can spare the time and the money, what more pleasant than to extend the voyage down to Renmark, and Adelaide, from whence there is the choice of rail or boat back to Melbourne. This will become a common trip.

Victorians are often reproached with devoting too much of their time to pleasure. Perhaps they do; perhaps riot. If the charge be true, however, we must remember that they are not forgetful that there is such a thing as the cultivation of the habit of thrift. The existence of the numerous building societies and life insurance offices in Melbourne proves that much. For this reason I think that too much prominence cannot be given to the doings of really sound associations of this nature, because such information can only tend in one direction —the benefit of the public. As a monument of Australian thrift and enterprise, the Australian Mutual Provident Society, whose, affairs passed under review last week, stands pre-eminent, Its ramifications permeate the length and breadth of the colonies, t and affect more or less people of all classes. T gather from the report just issued that, at the close of last year, there were 94,098 policy-holders, assuring the enormous sum of £30,000,000, to which bonuses to the extent of £5,000,000 have been added. Thirty-five millions of money —nearly sufficient to pay off the public debt of Victoria. Suppose we take the average family at five persons,and makearough comparison with these 94,098 policyholders, and .'.- 'u-ii- ■ !V'ier, that each member of is. ■■■ imi l:- resided in Victoria, we should have about half the population pecuniarily interested in this gigantic provident organisation, These facts should be laid to heart, not in Victoria only, but in all the colonies. They form, with others of a kindred nature, a- monument of Australian thrift. Jf we also, remember that the funds held by this society show a total of something like £9,000,000 —a sum equal to about two-thirds of the paid-up capital of all the banks of issue doing business in Victoria —one can understand the responsibility that rests upon the managers of such a society, for, apart from the business of life assurance, the influence of a financial concern of that magnitude must be enormous. As a matter of fact, the exhaustive reports issued from this office are always commented upon by the insurance Press, not only of the colonies, but of Great Britain, and the office itself is held up as a model of what life insurance offices should be. It is only natural that an institution of this kind should progress. Thus, 11,664 new policies, assuring £3,500,000, and increasing the funds three-quarters of a million sterling, were issued last year. Placing, as this does, the Australian Mutual Provident Society at the head of all kindred British institutions, the chairman of the meeting was quite justified in saying that "the society's income, over a million and a half sterling, is now larger than that of any ordinary life office in the United Kingdom, In its accumulated funds it is snrpaased by only Qne, while in .the returns, by way of bonuses to the policy-holders, it -is not equalled by any office, in the wprld, If the, history of the past may be accepted as an index of the future, there is every reason to Believe that the Australian Mutual Provident Society will continue to occupy the position which it now holds —that of the most successful life office which the world has yet seen."

The great comedian Toole will make his final appearance at the Princess's next Thursday night, aud if the arrangements for his performances in Australia, which

wer,e entered into prior to his arrival are adhered to, we are not likely to see him in Melbourne again. The "Little Lord Fauntleroy " Company will re-appear at this house next Saturday, after a successful tour through New Zealand. That very amusing piece, " The Private Secretary," continues to run at the Alexandra. "Caste" has been withdrawn from the Bijou, and succeeded by "Joseph's Sweetheart," a comedy founded on Fielding's novel, "Joseph Andrews." Everybody does not admire Fielding's style, but everybody will agree that Mr Buchanan's adaptation of this novel is free from the slightest vulgarity, and that " Joseph's sweetheart" is a most attractive comedy. Mr Charles Warner has chosen to make his farewell appearances at the Royal, prior to his departure for London, in the part of Wilfred Denever in " The Silver King."

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2439, 12 June 1890

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3,118

LOCAL AND GENERAL Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2439, 12 June 1890

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