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LOCAL AND GENERAL

■ Seven hundred porters have been engaged for the Emm expedition into Africa.

The Austrian Government is putting a stop to the large emigration of young meu.

P. and D. Duncan's trial of potato digger on Tuesday, 10th, at Mr J. Hunt's farm, Wakanui.

The Prince of Wales met the Duke of Marlborough in the streets of Paris and re. fused to notice the latter's passing salutation #

The royal yacht Osbornc when clocked at Portsmouth was found' to be thoroughly rotten. She was only built in 1870 at a cost of £134,000.

A bundle of spider webs not lai'ger than a buckshot and weighing less than a drachm would, if straightened out and untangled, reach a 1 distance of 350 miles

It may be remarked for the comforb of honest poverty that averice reigns most' in those who have but few good qualities to recommend them.' This is a weed that will grow onlj in a' barren soil.. ..

Eight varieties of leprosy are recognised in China, and the disease is regarded as contagious, infectious, and hereditary,- but is said to disappear in four generations.

The exports from Cape Colony last year were of the value of £9,405,955, or an increase of £073,354 on the previous year. Transvaal gold represented £5G0,495 and diamonds £4,325,137.

The Wellington Jubilee Committee has decided to apply the surplus of £250 towards placing pictures and books relating to the early settlement of the colony in the Public Library.

Changes are to be made in the uniform of the German Army, owing to the introduction of smokeless powder, the object being to make the outline of the soldier very indistinct to the enemy.

Owing to representations made to thp Railway Commissioners by Mr E. F. Wright the tciriif on the Rakaia-Methvcn line will be at ordinary rates on and after Ist July next. Hitherto the charge hal* been 3d per ton per mile.

Mr M. Redmayiie, of Tinwald, notifies dog owners in the Ashton, Flemington, and Wheatstone districts that he will take steps to have all dogs destroyed trespassing upon I his property. Recently thirty sheep were I worried, fifteen of which were killed. ' A most successful fancy dress ball .was last evening given in the Oddfellows' Hall! in honor of the coining of age of the eldest eon of Mr Alfred Curtis. ' The assembly of ladies and gentlemen in fancy dress costumes was very large, and the costumes both hand- j some and varied, but we defer until next issue a full report. j

Mr Stanley's new book, '' Darkest Africa) j will shortly be on,sale.by Messrs L. F. I Andrewes and Co. "The edition is a cheap > one, and as the snpply will be limited, orders I are now being taken. \' I

, German^ subjects are vaccinated in the early months of life, again on attaining the age of twelve, and all males a third time on entering" upon their term of compulsory service in the army. Vaccination is always done with calflymph: never from arm to arm.

The rush to the goldfields in the Transvaal region has been unprecedented in history.-: In three years £150,000,000 of English money have been invested there. Cities have sprung up where in 1886 only grass could be found and no habitation.

AtaCHristchurch gathering.of Freemasons on-Thursday afternoon, presided over by Mr T. S. Weston, an address and a- secretary's jewel were presented to Mr George R. Hart, in recognition of secretarial work done in coimection.with the establishment of the New

Zealand Grand Lodge,

At the Longbeach Road Board meeting on Monday tenders were opened'for making drain and forming track on Windermere Road, and that of Mr P. Grace was accepted. The Surveyors were instructed to obtain in writing the consent of the proprietors of the Chatmoss Estate to contribute half the cost of the work. > ' .

' At Ebingen, in Wurtemburg, Maria .Doerthing, the daughter of a farmer, has lain in continuous ■slumber since March Jsth.; Respiration is noticed, only by: means of the mirror. There is no difficulty in giving her nourishment, consisting of eggs and milk, which is forced down her throat.

There, has heen an appeal "made by the high churches and Catholic priests to their respective congregations'to 'boycott Mdme. Sarah Bernhardt while in London as a Eunishment for..wh^t they consider her lasphemy in reading the part of the Virgin Mary.

Charles Milligan, a Waianiwa farmer, has been committed for trial at Invercargill for savagely assaulting George Gorman, his father-in-law. The latter waa knocked down by a blow, from behind, and when down struck with a blunt instrument on the right eye and nose, the latter being broke and also one of his ribs, while five of his front teeth were knocked out. ■ .

The latest craze in Paris is the abolition of wrinkles in the face by means of eletricity, the process being.described 'as not painful, but only vexatious. First the.skin is simply touched —irritated, as it were—but gradu.ally the current is made stronger, till all skin imperfectiojis, are obliterated, ' and finally the surface becomes smooth, clear, and clean. Physicians superintend the treatment. , , V'

On Wednesday afternoon the Rev A.- B. Todd was induoted into the pastorate of the Geraldine Presbyterian Church, rendered vacant by the' retirement of the Rev G. Barclay. At a social public meeting 'to welcome the new pastor, the Rev W. Gillies (Timaru) said, although he could not boast of academical honours Tike Mr Todd as a B. A., yet he kept in his pocket a certificate which he considered to be qnite equal to it. It was as a second, prize ploughman in the first ploughing match mi New Zealand in 1858 or thereabout. The. tTnited- choips, of the Presbyterian, Anglican, and Primitive Methodist churches took part in the evening's proceedings.

I heard rather a good story the other day writes a London !ady. Somebody here was inquiring if it was quite safe to talk about convicts in Sydney'and other parts of Australia. (fAh," said an Australia present, '' there are two sides to this question, one of which I will illustrate by a stpry. A lady's maid was asked by her mistress to come homo to England with her, but to the surprise of tho lattej? the girl refused, .She was pressed to conio, but continually refused. At last she waa tißkod her reason, and replied that she was certain her f.'.fcher and mother would not like her to go. "But why ?" said her mistress. "Oh," said the girl, "is not England the place where all the bad people come from ?'"

A certain enterprisipg gentleman well known in Singapore, who is asserted bo have been lately passing a very plesant time in Hong l^ong, was present at a recent convivial entertainment; there at which assisted a strong force of true Caledonians. Burns' immortal patriotic lyric, "Scot's wha hae wi' Wallace bled," had just been chanted forth in rousing style by the full strength of the company. After its echoes had died away and the toddy tumblers were being duly replenished, the enterprising one was noticed to be brooding over some browknitting enigma. • Ai last his perplexities found utterance, and, in a markedly colonial accent, he thus spoke—"But look here j who's Wah Hay ?"

Probably the severest labour undergone in any part of the world is that which is endured by the carriers in the tea trade between the south-west of China and Thibet, ihe tea has to be introduced into Thibet across high mountains, and is carried either on muleback or by porters. A mule goes j more than twice as fast as a, human porter, I but carries only half the load, a mans load being on an average nearly 2001b, in some exceptional instances more than 4001b , . . Travelling six or seven miles a day, and resting in the inns at night, they toil with the prodigious loads over two mountain passes 7000 ft above their starting place, along a rudely-paved road where every step of the way must be picked, making a distance of 120 miles in twenty days or less, and receiv: ing a sum equal to about Is 6d or a little more, according to the number of packages carried. A meeting of the South Rakaia Loyal Orange Lodge, No. 25, was held in the Oddfellows' Hall, South Rakaia, on Friday evening, 30th May, the R.W.G.M. the Rev Bro Ellis, in the chair. The minutes of last 1 meeting were read and confirmed. Correspondence was received and dealt with. One i brother was admitted a member on certificate from No. 10 and clearance from No. 32. A candidate was admitted on ballot. It was proposed and seconded that the Lodge hold a Church Parade on Sunday, 6th July. It was also carried that a ball be held in Rakaia Town Hall on Friday, 11th July, so I as not to interfere with G.L. meeting in Christclmrch on 12th July. The Lodge was then raised to the R.A.P. degree, and the degree and lecture were given in a very able and impressive manner by the R.W.G.M. Nothing further offering for the good of the order the Lodge was then lowered and closed in due form. The brethren then adjourned to the refreshment room where a plentiful supply of temperance refreshments wore provided. After the usual loyal toasts were honored* and a few of the old songs sung, ending with a stave of God Save the Queen, the brethren separated after spendiug a very enjoyable evening.

Mr Charles Santley, the eminent baritone, has returned to! Melbourne, highly gratified with his New Zealand tour; In every town in Maoriland which he visited he met with the heartiest reception, and always sang to large and demonstrative audiences. The '' Argus " states that an amusing feature in connection with his journeyings was the large number of persons of both sexes who consulted him with regard to their voices and their chances of success in the profession. The majority considered themselves heaven-born singers, and the task which Mr Santley had of tellinr; them plain honest truths was often a difficult one. One gentleman who waited on him with assuring manner startled him by announcing that he had a baritone voice with a range of three octaves. A singer is generally satisfied with two octaves, but this gentleman was. quite prepared to enter into friendly competition with a'bassoon in regard to compass. When Mr Santley sat down to Lhc piano to take the three octaved gentleman up a scale, he found that he could sing about eight notes. The would-be singer, however, begged to be heard in some of his favourite solos, and, to Mr Santley's horror, produced the music of "Honor and Arms " and "Ruddier than the Cherry," through which he panted in a manner which was enough to make Handel turn in his grave.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900607.2.5

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIV, Issue 2435, 7 June 1890

Word Count
1,799

LOCAL AND GENERAL Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIV, Issue 2435, 7 June 1890

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