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Producing Cheap Grain.

gphe American farmer is'gettfoig tired of producing che.ap grain. He has.for many years been engaged in competing against the English farmer, but having succeeded \n ruining that respectable individual lie only finds himself poor. "The agricultural depression " so long discussed in England is now a " live question " in the United, States. Although the production

of wheat has not materially increased during the last ten years, India has come into the competition, and prices have fallen. The wheat crop of 1881 in the United States consisted of 498,000,000 bushels, and that of last harvest was 490,000,000 bushels. In 1885 the crop was 512 million bushels, in 1883 it was 504 million, and the average for,the last nine years has been 450 million bushels. When the increase of population is taken into account, it will be seen that there has been no corresponding increase in Avheat production. There has, on the other hand, been a con tinuous increase in the production of maize, which is the staple stock feeding crop of the country.. In 1883 the corn crop amounted to 1617 million bushels, | in 1889 to 1988 million, and in 1890 to i 2113 million bushels. In 1883 the special commissioner of this journal to America stated that the United States could not produce cheaper wheat than Australia, and predicted that low prices would force the American farmer to turn his attention to other crops. Low prices have prevailed, and wheat production has ceased to increase in America. As the present production leaves a large surplus for export, the "agricultural depression" is attributed to over production, and the Washington Department of Agriculture entreats the farmers to abandon the business of supplying the English manufacturing population with cheap bread. The value of agricultural products imported into the United States is nearly equal to the value of agricultural exports, and farmers are urged to cease the production of cheap bread, and to cultivate those crops which will supply the place of imports. This advice, which is backed up by the argument of prices, will no doubt be gradually taken, and it is al&o worthy of consideration in Australia.—" Australasian."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900605.2.34

Bibliographic details

Producing Cheap Grain., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIV, Issue 2433, 5 June 1890

Word Count
358

Producing Cheap Grain. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIV, Issue 2433, 5 June 1890

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