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LOCAL AND GENERAL

Chicago has thirty-seven women lawyers. The Monpwa* took fifty passengers for Sydney from Dunsdjn on Tuesday. ■

Spurious half-crowns and florins are re ported to be in circulation in Wellington.

The dock charges at Auckland are 25 per cent lower than those of Sydney.

In 1846 thej?e WQ re fifteen daily, newspapers published in Boston, npw there are but eight.

The new French seagoing $orpedo-boat has used her torpedo tubes with sucepjss when going at the rate of 21 £ knots an hour.

Lord Kintore, Governor of South Australia is a practical engine driver, and could earn his livelihood #t the trade if the worst came to the worst.

The liquidators of the }ase 'ftjwn and Country Bank, Adelaide, have netted £51,000 for their claim for 20,000 shares in the Commercial Bank, Melbourne.

The Public Works Committee of New South Wales recommend the construction of a composite bpidge of iron, steel, and timber at Cowra at a cost of £26;533;

The ' Southland Accjimalbteaticn Society have decided to ask Government to grant funds for the importation of dark-colored opossums from Tasmania.

In the Wellington district a boy has been expelled from School because he refused to stack firewood when requested to do so by the teacher,

At the Coroner's honest in the New Plymouth murder case tlje jury,- having failed to agree, were discharged, put were bound over to attend the Court at the *wxt Criminal sitting.

Mr Abigail, New South Wales Minister of Mines in Sir Henry I'arkps' kst Administration, is a self-made man. Twenty-five years ago he worked in Auckland as a 'boot* maker for Mr B. Gittos,

Men who are not sporting—or a)t any i;atc racing men—have noted the happy hit which Mr Tancred has made hi nammg the Derby horse he nominated here last week Sir Harry. He is by The Premier, out of Gabble.—" Hawke's Bay Herald.

It is $44 that the French Government ; has just given to the Government of Russia I jbhe secret of itj? new pnipkeless powder, and that the 'Russians are about to begm the manufacture of it upoji a large sjcaje, using imported workmenand being carefuj. to exclude Germans and Jews from the factories. The basis of the powder is said to be sul«phuric ether.

It is reported that Sir Julius Vogel is coining tq'jthe colony shortly to take the editorship.of the " New Zealand Times."

Referring to the surplus of £115,000, Mr McArthur, M.H.R. for Manawatu says, that iMhe ordinary debts of the colony were paid there would be no surplus.

The country having the largest proportion of cultivatad land is Denmark, Russia having the smallest. The'United'Kingdom has 29 per cent of land tilled against 71 untilled.

Fifty-three pigeons liberated at Oamaru a day or two ago, were all home in Christchurch in 150 to 158-minutes. The defence is 144 milea in a straight line.

Before his Worship the Mayor, this morn- 1 ing, Joseph Barnes, an old toper," pleaded, guilty to having been drunk in East street, and- was-findd 10swith r2a costs,' Barnes«had a record of eight-previous convictions against him—all for .drunkenness. . ; . f \ , Mr. Gladstone writes:—",My reason? for not visiting'lreland is that my going there may tend to exasperate opponents in Ulster.,' whose severance on the Irish, question from most of their fellow-countrymen as well as from their own ancestors is perhaps' the greatest Irish misfortune of the present day.'-

Charles Lamb was sitting next a chattering woman at 'dinner! Observing he didn't ,attend'to her/" You don't seem," said tho ladyi " to be at all tha better for what I ani saying to you !"• "No ma'am," hd answered, "but this'gentleman on the other side of me must, for it all came' in, at one ear and Vent out at the other !",. ■;>-',

Some boys discovered a heap of bones on 'Dunedin Sandhills'on Sunday evening.' On examination 'they proved -to, be the remains of, a human body,'but it is impossible to ascertain how long the remains liav.e been where they were found, as sand is said to have a tendency to keep bones in a 'good state of'preservation, „ \ A good story is told of the Emperor William apropos iof; the Labour Conference. A manufacturer remonstrated with him on the ground that it (wa& an undue interference with freedom of commerce. "Strange," said the' Emperor, ''that you did not thinkjwhat free 1 commerce interfered with when I' sent two'regiments of soldiers (to put down the strikers. ;Howover, X dp riot mean to see ,the working men stretched any longer on the dissecting table ; of ,the employer."

Mr Walker, i M.H.R. for, .Ashburton, addressed ,his constituents in the Mount Somers Schoolroom on Monday evening last. The attendance was not large. The:chair was occupied,by Mr AY E. Peache; who briefly introduced'the speaker. Mr Walker's 1 address was in the main a regime of his speech at Ashburton, and was listened to with .much attention. At the; close he received a unanimous voter of thanks and confidence. A vote of thanks to the Chairman terminated the proceedings. „•■<«:

It is a curious fact that the national antipathy of French and ' English for each other, wants Uttle at any time to fan it into flame. Years of companionship in Canada have not sufficed to extinguish it, in! proof of which we always read about frictic-n between the French and English there, whenever there is friction between the mother countries.. A French warship has been interfering with Newfoundland fishermep, and we find the two paces in Qanada at loggerheads.

Drring the course of an address delivered in New. South Wales by Mr M'Lean, he said Victorian farmers were coming to, grief. Their land was mortgaged, and they were paying as much as 25 to 30 per cent for money in emergencies. Owing ,to tne bad state of the outside markets and other causes many of the farmers were selling out and leaving for New South Wales. Who was to pay the public indebtedness if the Victorian farmers were driven off the land? Tfais is a question that is troubling the people of Victoria at the present time.

The "Liverpool Journal ot Commerce" says :—lt is stated that a brine spring has been' discovered in the cutting of the Man-

cheater Ship Canal near Partingtonf The water from the spring is being tested in order to ascertain its strength and th_e probable richness pi the assumed salt- beds. If the result is satisfactory, boring will no doubt be, resorted to. Should it, be proved

that rich deposits of salt underlie the company's property, the Importance of the discovery to the company, not only as regards the development of a salt industry, but also with respect to^traffic on the canal, is manifest.

The first message on the new cable laid between Sydney and New Zealand came through on May 16th when Sir Harry Atkinson, the Premier of New Zealand, wired as follows to Mr. J). O'Connor, the Post-master-General of New South Wales:— " Accept our hearty congratulations on successful laying duplicate cable ; may it tend to strengthen friendly relations between Australia and New Zealand." To this Mr O'Connor replied: "Many thanks. Heartily reciprocate your congratulations on completion of this important work, which I hope will cement, the union between Australia, New Zealand, and the mother country,"

Colonel Everett, of'-O "-"or TP -V:-; ersi Avrites on the •<..■«• «■■ '«'.■■ 1M:-.-". stories of Tel-el-Kebir, published in the

"Nineteenth Century " :—"The most conclusive evidence having been brought before me of the absolute falsehood of the stories related in the "Nineteenth Centurj Review '■' of this mpnth, in ,connection wi^h the battalion un.49r my command', regarding the killingof men by their comrades for treachery, beating of men with rifle slings, drinking of camel's blood, and wounded being left'on the field for an extraordinary time, etc., ; at the battle of Tel-el-Kebir, it only remains for me to request that you will be so good as to publish this, my most unqualified and emphatic deqial of same."

Nothing can well be more pathetic than the circumstances attending the death of Mark Henry Vaal, a casually employed dock laborer in London. Mr Wynne Baxter held an inquest on his body, and it ascertained from the evidence, given that the poor fellow had actually starved himself to feed his children. His widow is an inmate of the Banstead Lunatic Asylum, so that the" fours little ones—the eldest is thirteen aiid^'th'b 1 youngest four—are now thrown upon the work?. In the last fortnight he managed to get work on three days, and it was on Thursday at six o'clock in the London Docks, and when he was about to draw his pay, that his ill-nourished frame gave way. The coronor's jury were convinced that the map had starved himself that his children might be nourished.

The papers are full of accounts of a silver centre-piece which is being manufactured fot' the Queenj and which contains 2000oz of silver. Oonsider-iflg that there is already plate at Windsor Castle which is valued at upwards of £2,000,000, it is difficult to conceive what the Queen can want with another centre-piece, especially when so very few entertainments of , any kind are given by Her Majesty. During the reign of George IV gold and silver plate was purchased 'by His Majesty, for which the country had to pay to the amount of nearly £300,000. In the private .apartments at Windsor there is a punch bowl' and ladle for which alone the bill was 10,000 guineas.

In reference to the price of wheat the "Auckland Herald's" London agricultural correspondent writes : —This subject is very interostiug to wheat-growers in Australasia, now tha£ there is a considerable surplus to dispose of. I fear that this surplus destroys the last hope of a substantial rise in the prices if the prospects' of the new crop in nearly every country are to remain as favor? able as they are now reported to be. The market was very dull on Monday, chiefly because of the news of the Australian surplus and of the surprisingly large stock of whfe^t reported to be in the hands of American termers. As a top price for New Zealand longberry wlwq,t, 3ss a quarter in London is very disheartening. •

A good instance pf a neat 'diplomatic rejoinder js embodied in a story regarding Count Herbert Bismarck on the" occasion of the .German Emperor's visit to- Rome last year. At the railway station Q?unt Herbert, who is not renowned for the sauvity of his manners, pushed rudely against an Italian dienitapy who was watching the proceedings. The digitary was .greatly incensed, and remonstrated very forcibly against such unceremonious treatment, whereupon .Count Herbert turned' round haughtily aud said, "I don't think you know who I am. I am Count Herbert Bismarck." , '.', That," replied the Italian, bowing politely, "as an excuse is insufficient, but as an explanation it is JJiple."

The "Auckland Star" says the necessity ( for a Mr Plimsoll in Australasian and New Zealand ports ia pressing,'for the overloading condition in which some-vessels are sent to sea from Newcastle with coal, and from New Zealand ports as well, is beginning,to rouse attention among''shipping men. . It^is stated that often ships ,leave Newcastle, coal-laden, in. a dangerously overloaded state, and there is but little doubt that many of the disasters, to foreign bound vessels from Newcastle are due to this. If the truth were known perhaps the lamentable loss with all hands of the ship County of Carnarvon somewhere off. the.NjßW^. Zealand coast might be attributable to" overloading with coal. Recently a barque which arrived at Newcastle reported having jettisoned a quantity of coaL.for, safety,,and.it.is stated that another barque came into the harbor from the same port so deeply laden with coal that she had little more than a foot of free-boar,d. ' The '". Manawatu Standard " ia responsible <yd

for the following:'—" Most of our readers will ■vm-'ViiivT th-'vnvi Egan, who was convicted. ( f .-■ ■ 'l::i/ .1 r< -.vlver from Mr Flood's resi-' denee 1 at''Oairere some' time'ago,' and -who, daring his 1, spare r time:iil; gabl, completed, a model of a torpedo. ,boat, which,he had in-,, vented. After he was liberated) he brought his invention under the notice of the proper authorities, which resulted in his being called Home. On, arriving^ there,,,he-. received £12,000 as liis share of the'ihve'ribibnl 'Then by some means he contrived to obtain an entry' into'society,' 1 from which" he presently! emerged with a young and pretty "wife. After three weeks of perfect happiness, he took it into his head to inflict a severe chastisement on the lady of his love. From the proceedings which followed, it was elicited that he was a married man, and the upshot of the whole affair is that his London wife has instituted a suit for bigamy with £10,000 damages, while hia forgotten spouse in New Zealand has also instituted proceedings, so that he has a lively time in store."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900604.2.4

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL, Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIV, Issue 2432, 4 June 1890

Word Count
2,136

LOCAL AND GENERAL Ashburton Guardian, Volume XIV, Issue 2432, 4 June 1890

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