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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

The hounds inset at Scotsdean, Dromore, at 1 p.m. on Thursday next.

We have to acknowledge, with thanks, the receipt of the Union Steamship Company's time tables for June.

Wirth Bros' little trick pony Barney met with an accident at Wa;'pawa Ijvst week, an.l broke his neck.

British crops average twenty-eight bushels of wheat per acre, while in France they reach only fifteen bushels.

The Sydney telegraph office transmits about 12,000 messages daily, and 96 officers are employed in the operating room at one time. £70,000 was given by the Government in March, 1885, for Raphael's "Ansidei Madonna" in the Duke of Marlborough's Blenheim collection of paintings.

In 1858 there were 400 miles of telegraph line in New South Wales and 10,000 messages were dispatched, whilst in 1888 there were 22,212 miles of wire, and the number of messages transmitted was 3,410,407.

On St Patrick's Day the Pope wore a spray of shamrock which had been presented to his Holiness by Prior Glymi—the Augustinian Father whose association with the building of the Irish national church has made him so famous.

The Ashburton Acclimatisation Society held a meeting on Friday and considered the balance sheet to be submitted to the annual meeting. After an hour or so spent in a conversational discussion on fish and piscatorial matters, the meeting adjourned.

The oddest thing in strikes occurred at Brisbane lately, where the news boys paraded the streets of fiat city parrying the Australian Jack as a burner'and placards announcing that they had struck against " injustice and small pay."

The June number of " Zealanclia," the literary monthly published in Dunedin, is, we learn, to be the last issue of that periodical. The magazine,- although a literary success, has not proved so financially, and the promoters do not feel justified in carrying on the venture. The June number completes the first year of publication.

As will be seen by advertisement elsewhere, the new steamer of the Union Company, the Monowai, will leave Lyttelton on Thursday next- on an excursion trip to Sydney, via East Coast ports and Auckland. lhe fares are exceptionally low, and as the vessel is the finest of the renowned floet of the Union Company, no doubt many will take advantage of the opportunity.

The Committee of the Palestine Exploration Fund announces some important discoveries at the Pool of Bcthcsik. A fresco has been discovered en a wall of the crypt of the ancient church Avhich marks the Poo]. It represents an angel troubling the water, and thus shows that in the clays of the Crusades the place was fully recognised as the spot mentioned in Biblical history.

The Laccadivc Islands are suffering from a dreadful plague of rats which have destroyed the cocoanut plantations and reduced .the inhabitants to destitution. The plaster of Paris cure is being tried. It consists in sprinkling plenty of powdered plaster of Paris upon boiled rice. After eating it the rats become thirsty, it is said, ancf when they have drunken, the water hardens the plaster of Paris and kills them

, Miss Lottie Dodd, the champion female tennis-player of the world, lives "at Burton Held, near Liverpool (Eng), ami like a real enthusiast, works at tjie gzwe every day. She is 20 years of age, weighs about 1601b, is; healthy, ruddy, and strong as a man, but with all her training, has not lost a particle of her womanliness. .She is the admiration of the male players, who allow her half 30, and are beaten quite as often as they beat her,

The "New Zealand Times "has changed its form and now appears as a four-page instead of an eight-page paper.

The Hon. Mr Fergus passed through Ashburton by the express train on Saturday for Christchurch, en route for Wellington.

Rev Alex. Mackay, the missionary in Africa whom Stanley linked with Livingstone and Moffat, and known as " the Scotch St Paul." has died at his post in Africa.

For putting a piece of lead into the slot of a machine and obtaining a piece of Everton toffee value one penny, a man was sentenced to fourteen days' hard labor in Sydney.

Mr James Carrol, M.H.R., who formerly was a staunch Ministerialist, now announces himself as an Oppositionist,. and says that events fully justify his change of front.

The master of the Home wishes to acknowledge with thanks the receipt of a quantity of buns from Mr Grubb ; tobacco from His Lordship Bishop Julius, per Rev E. A. Scott; papers and periodicals from MissKitcherman per Rev J. N. Buttle; collars and ties from Mr Moss forthe useof the inmates.

• The deaths of the Hon; R. Campbell an<* H. H. Lahmann and the resignation of M r Waterhouse has brought down the number of the Legislative Council to 40. It is understood that no fresh appointment will be made until the number falls' below 37, which is to be the normal quota of members in future —or one-half the number of the next House of Representatives.

A serious disease among horses is reported from South Australia. The supposition s ihat it is influenza. The probabilities are however, that, whether it be influenza or not, it is the same disease which has recently caused so much loss and -, inconvenience, in South .Africa. Its, spread throughout the -Colonies would be disastrous, and if it be the same disease, its breaking out on this side of the Indian Ocean is most ominous.— (" Tablet.") r . „ - ,

The Monowai is tHe first of three vessels to be added to the Union Company's magnificent fleet. She is to be followed by the Rotokino, of 3000 tons, specially built for the Westport trade, and she will carry a large cargo on a light draught of .water. The next vessel ■ will' be the Tavinni, specially built for the. Melbourne and Fiji trade. She'has a cargo capacity of about 2000 tons, and is. specially fitted up, both as regards passengers and cargo, to suit the South Seas trade, special attention having been paid to the ventilation.' ■ She will be provided with a refrigerator and all other necessary accessories to the carrying of tropical fruit.

A woman who had suffered from her hus* band's neglect in Dimedin traced him (says the " Tuapeka Times "j to a bar parlourwhere he|was playing cards with several companions. Setting a covered dish she held in her hands down upon the table, she said, "Presuming you were too busy to come home to dinner, I have brought it to you," and departed. With a forced laugh he Invited his friends to dine with him, but on removing the cbver from the dish found only a slip of paper, on which was written, " I hope you will enjoy the meal; it is the same as your family have at home."

An Australian paper says:—The New Zealand trotting mare Daisy, owned by Mr A. J, Keith, gave an exhibition at Moonee Valley last week which has been the subject of much talk. Starting 400 yds behind scratch she won one event, and was only prevented from winning the second by her penalty of an additional 50yds back in the handicap. She was beaten by a handsome and well-bred trotting colt called Specification, who shaped in a manner worthy of his American • sire Contractor. It is doubtful if Daisy has an equal as a trotter in Australia. Racing men ■ '■■ --"-— v ~ t--. think more and more of J{ew '/. ■'. -ii, ■• I.:,. 1 -:au turn out'champion flat racers, steeplechasers, and trotters.

The request for prominent hotel projisi'lies ill Broadway abates nothing (says the "Beefton Times.") We learn that thp owner of a well-known corner hotol, who purchased a few months ago for £1400, has just refused £2000 cash. Three years ago, when the population of the district was probably nearly as large as it is at present, the same property could have been bought for £400. The reason of the rise in value may be attributed solely to the assurance which has come in recent years of the penncnance of the mining industry here, ana not upon fche strength, or to any expectation, of any extraordinary increase in the population,

The bell for the Jubilee Clock Is now in the ren cling room of the Public Library. It is a somewhat formidable looking disturber of the peace, measuring two feet across the mouth and standing two feet high. It has been made without dapper, as for purposes, of telling the lwnir, the bell will bo struck ; but provision has been made for adding a clapper if in the future the Council should decide to have the bell swung so that a peal could be rung from it. For instance it may be decided to ring the bell daily at noon, the ordinary dinner hour of most working men, and at five in the evening, the time for "knocking oif." On the side of the bell is cast in relief the inscription—"Ashburton Jubilee Memorial, David Thomas, Mayor, 18SS." On the outside lip of the bell there is cast, also in relief, the name of the bell founders—A. and T. Burt, Dunedin. It may ]ye added that the pitcli note of die bell is E. Bafore the Mayor this morning, the man Gill, who only on Saturday completed a month's imprisonment with hard labor for a brutal assault committed on Mr George Cox, was remanded until to-morrow, Gill is charged with having committed an unprovoked and brutal assault upon an old man called Leek, 75 years of age. The tM'o men had been sleeping in the game room hi a hotel in town on Saturday night, when Gill is alleged to have put out the light, mauled and knuckled the old men badly, blackening both his eyes, jumped upon his chest and stomach, and left the poor old fellow insensible. The landlord, on being macle aware of what was going on, interfered and ejected Gill, who was arrested two hours after-wards by Constable Fitzgerald. Gill is alleged to have stolen £1 from the old man, who, on returning to consciousness, found that that sum hacf been abstracted from his pur3e, which he found under the bed.

The Wellington correspondent of "the Daily Times " writes:—Various rumors are about in volunteer circles as to the projected changes in the colonial forces. ,It is said that there are going to be so many navals for the forts and submining field, and that the artillery, engineers, and infantry are to be paid so many clays per year, which tfme will be spent in camp, about a fortnight at Easter and on other days—such as Saturday afternoon, holiday, etc., and called daylight drills. It is understood officers and men alike will have to learn their work and drill thoroughly. Tho present force will be disbanded and a fresh start made on these lines. As to the cost .nothing is known, but some authorities estimate that these arrangements will cost about £20,000 a year. The Ashburton Hounds met, as appointed, at Mr Max Friedlander's on Friday last. About five-and-twenty sportsmen put in an appearance and enjoyed a capital day's sport. The ground was in better condition than it has hetin this year, and scent was good. The first hare was found at the lower end of the farm, and ran across Mr Brick's land, and across and round two of Mr Wallace's paddocks being killed in the fence by the railway line. Time, aboiit half an hour ; distance covered three and a half to four miles. After half an hour's spell devoted' to doing justice to Mr Friedlander's hospi. tality, a fresh start was made and a hare quickly found and as quickly lost. Another was found in the plantation, close to the Lyndhurst raacl, which ran across Mr Gaul's paddock to his homestead and back to the plantation. Here the hounds changed and ran a ring in Mr Friedlander's paddocks and coming back to the plantation changee 1 again, it is thought on to the original hare, ' which ran across the road and the same line I to Mr Gaul's, but turning away from his homestead ran right across his farm to Mr Boag's fence, where she was killed. Mr Friedlander's hospitality was again tested, and after three hearty cheers had been given for Mrs and Mr Friecllancler, a homeward movement was made!

There is now to be seen in the shop window of Messrs J. Scaly and Co., East street, a co-lsction of apples showing some of the sorts grown at the nurseries, Riverbank, that will repay inspection by any one who contempV^- t■"! .• ': ■ fruit plants. There are

■■" ■ ■ "■!:■ ■•: " i; different kinds shown, all valuable, long keeping sorts. for size, color, and general excellence they, are by far the finest that have been shown in Ashburton thti season,—(A4vt.)

The Union Steamship Company's new , stoimer Rotokino, of about 2000 tons, was ' launched by Denny's on the 3rd April. She is 270 ft long by 37£ ft by 215 ft, and will be fitted after the usual tasteful and lavish style.

Nominations for the Ashburton Coursing Club's meeting close at the Somerset hotel to-morrow at 9 p.m. The meet takes place at Winter's corner on Wednesday morning at 9.30. The London correspondent of the (, s Manchester Guardian " writes : I hear of a remarkable romance, A woman, lately "b convict, has married the chaplain of one of the home country gaols. The clergyman in question was a widower with a large family, and the wedding only became known through an official of the penal department complaining tKat the wife had not reported herself on the ticket of leave. Inconsequence of the. fact coming out the clergyman has asked for and been appointed to another prison in the north of England. . .. , HollcJway's PiiiLS.— Weary of life.--Derangement of the liver is one of the most efficient causes of dangerous disease, and the most prolific source of those melancholy forebodings which are worse than death itself. A few doses of these noted pills act magically in dispelling low spirits, and repelling the covert attacks made on the nerves by exces-. siye heat, impure atmosphere, over-indul-|gence, or exhausting excitement. The ■■'■I'.IV--f-1 ron.-Mtution may derive benefit ■i<-!:: II"!'-!11. \\\ Pills, which will regulate disorderd action, brace the nerves, increase the energy of the intellectual faculties, arid' revive the failing memory. By attentively studying the instructions for taking these pills, and explicitly putting them in practice, the most desponding will soon feel confident of a perfect recovery. The best medicine is Sander and Sons' Eucalpyti Extract. Test its eminent powerful effects in coughs, colds, influenza, etc.— the relief is instantaneous. Thousands give the most gratifying testimony. His Majesty the King of Italy and medical syndicates all over the world ara its patrons. Read the official reports that accompany each bottle. We have no occasion to offer rewards in proof of the genuineness of our references. The official reports of medical clinics and,universities, the official communications of the Consul-General for Italy at Melbourne; the diploma awarded International Exhibition, Amsterdam—all these are authentic documents, and, as such, not open to doubt. W. add here epitome of one of the various cases treated at the clinic of Schultz, M.D. Professor, etc.—"C. 8., 24 years old; congestional abscess on the thigh. Incisions made in two places. Although Lister's dressing was applied, the secretion became, two days later, very copious, and had adopted a foetid decomposed character. The temperature rose enormously. In consequence the dressing was removed and in its place were made during the day-time repeated irrigations with Eucalypti Extract, The offensive fceter disappeared very soon, the fever abated within a few days, and the patient recovered after th,e lapse of several weeks. In this instance we must not lose sight of the fact that the latter treatment saved the patient's life."— (Advt.) - • 3

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900602.2.4

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Ashburton Guardian, Volume XII, Issue 2430, 2 June 1890

Word Count
2,627

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XII, Issue 2430, 2 June 1890

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