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The Settlement of Africa.

SATEMENT BY LORD SALISBURY.

[per press' association.]

London, May 23.

Lord Salisbury again denies that English rights in Africa have been in any way surrendered to Germany. Nothing had been determined on, and possibly no settlement would be arrived at. A strong Committee had been appointed for the defence of British territory, but, in view of the difficulties surrounding the question, it would not act without the approval of Parliament. The Premier considers that African questions once settled the outlook for peace was never more promising.

The " Times " urges the neutralization of Lakes Tanganyika and Victoria Nyanza.

The Premier, speaking at the Merchant Taylors' Banquet, deprecated boundless annexation in. the centre of Africa. The defence of the seaboard was easy, but that of the interior iinpos-

sible,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900524.2.6

Bibliographic details

The Settlement of Africa., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2438, 24 May 1890

Word Count
131

The Settlement of Africa. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2438, 24 May 1890

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