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The Imperial Parliament

•" Speaking .of Ms experiences in England during his recent visit to 'engineer the Victorian Divorce .Bill, Mr ShieLp remarked to an interviwer :—Nothing that I have seen or heard in the House of Commons has made me think disparagingly of the Australian Legislatures. To tell the truth, I was somewhat disappointed with the .House of Commons. My expectations were raised too high. While they have much better and more finished, they", have prosier and duller, though more correct speakers than ours. With some individual exceptions, the general style of Parliamentary spealdng at Home is wanting in animation and. emphasis, and in variety of intona; tion and gesture. The matter is much (better,-but the manner of delivery is worse than with us. Hence their speeches are better to read than to hear. In the matter of attendance, our Assembly is 1 more punctual, and relatively fuller throughout the sittings. It seems to m c that nothing short of an earthquake will make the average Englishman postpone for a mimxte his luncheon or dinner. On the Parnell report, when Mr Gladstone was making one of his historic' speeches, I saw from 15 to 20 members leave the chamber, and when Sir Michael Hicks-Beach rose to reply, a house over 500 strong thinned away to about 40, and this, too, on the first night of a great debate. Cuisine and empty stomachs beat orating and duty hollow. . ."

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900523.2.13

Bibliographic details

The Imperial Parliament, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2437, 23 May 1890

Word Count
237

The Imperial Parliament Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2437, 23 May 1890

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