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The Ink Plant in New Zealand.

Writing to -the "Bush Advocate" (published at Danevirke by our old friend Mr Glayton) Mr W. Colenso says:—ln your paper of the 13th inst, you inform your readers that "In New Granada a plant grows that is locally known as the ink plant; its scientific name is coriw ia th mifolia. Without any previous preparation its juice can be used as ink, etc." I suppose you are not aware that this same plant is common here in New Zealand, especially in certain localities. I originally detected it, 45 years ago, growing profusely among the common fern on the hills near Pohue (on the old Maori track to the Mohaka river at Taupo), and afterwards, though more sparingly, near To Pakipaki, and also on the low grounds between the river Ngaruroro and the Middle road, north of Havelock. It is still more common in Otago, and is the " ground tutu " of the settlers in those parts. "It is nearly allied to our common, large, and well-known tutu (pronounced "toot" by settlers), coriaria ruscif li>, of which the juice was largely used by Maoris some 45 or 50 years ago as a substitute for ink, in the scarcity of the British article. I doubt, however, its nermanencv.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900520.2.7

Bibliographic details

The Ink Plant in New Zealand., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2434, 20 May 1890

Word Count
211

The Ink Plant in New Zealand. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2434, 20 May 1890

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