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Hampstead School.

"the; recent MpkoveSients. • The improvements rendered necessary upon^the Hampstead School buildings by the 'growing increase in the number of pupils were completed last week, and the school is now capable of accommodating \as many children as the district is likely jto send, for some years at least. During the progress of the work, accommodation was found for/the..children the integrity of whose class was attacked by the workmen )( in outside .halls, the Salvation Barrack's supplying space, foi^ several lasses, .but.'despite the degree of disorganisation that was inevitable under these circumstances, discipline' has •'been well maintained, and, all things considered, the master j Mr Malcolm, is not dissatisfied with ; the workdone by.the children. " .., L'i Grippe has .very considerably interfered'with the attendance since the re,opening -if tcr thr y-.Y.rl-.y?, aiid'increased accommoV' ' i> if ;::.r ('.invent and the Catholic Boys' School (has made room in these institutions for a-considerable num- . berJof children belonging to?- the Catholic .faith who , were' t compelled to use the Government schools. About 30. of these c 1 :1 n.i■; 11 v.':■:.« under tuition at Hampstead \ ■■■ I:, 1., 'i-i I*, of course, left to attend the schools of their own denomination.! These two fa'cts have combined to reduce for a time the average attendance, but still there is an average attendance of about 340. The buildings are now complete, as we have said, and a more compact or convenient school could' hardly be obtained. ■The sanitary arrangements, always an important factor in the comfort of school buildings, are now perfect, and whatever may affect the health of the Hampstead children, it can hardly be traceable to either the arrangement or construction of the outbuildings, the drainage of the main building and grounds, "or the ventilation of the class rooms. J" ' Miss ShirtclifPs room, sacred to the infants, and all 1» l-«v. i\:-.- 1 -1 .-i^iidird. has had no'addition n;«l> 1 i«i \\, i»m tin: i.ther additions in the building have given more room hero, and she now works with, the conveinent number of 110 or so directly under her own eyes and those of her assistants.^ She has, Jiowever, 130 on her roll, and could easily find room for them and to spare. > To the central room lOft.has been added in length', the old mairi'entrance has bWii closed,up,,and.the fireplace that used to be in the end waif "has been removed to the middle wall, thereby securing a more tl"i"-r-'.r ( r.' li n.-l i -;«?-lI diffusion of heat. t Tv- 'ii-vil!-:!>:-,.■■■< room has not; been' interfered with, so that here the sth, 6th, and 7th standards are studied as before, and there were 34 children deep in these researches at the time of our visit. This room is just off the eastern porch, and off. the headmaster's room again is thai of the 4th standard. In the 3rd and "V4th standards in all schools the greatest number of pupils are usually to be jfound, and to the 4th standard room has been added 22 feet more of space, that is to say, the room has been lengthened by 22ft, the other measurements being carried along .withthe extension. ..This will provide acco- t modation in one room for the 3rd and' 4th standards, and so relieve the hampering that used to occur in the central room. • ?.,,, The ventilation, as has been Baj,<j>:is perfect—especially in the new rooms. By a very simple but ingenious arrangement of a grating in the outside wall, and a pipe carried from it half way up, inside a continuous current of fresh air ; is. admitted at intervals along the walls of the rooms. At the top of the walls again valve ventilators are at 'work to give egress to the vitiated air, and this \ egress the * current from the wall ,^ pipes just below materially facilitates. Between 300 and 400 children necessarily use .and waste a large quantity of water, so -,th'at the pumps are almost constantly going, and the overflow serves admirably for flushing the concrete open channel that carries the surplus to the outlet. TJie. entrances "to, the school are .three in hupaber, an^ the buildings^nowj being in the shape 6f. a double T,,the f entrances are so' placecTas to avoid the annoyance of a nor'wester or,.the more disagreeable blast'off the sea—altogether a comfortable arid'iwell.arranged' school. ' ">a' " ; ..

The explorers who have penetrated into Africa have been surprised at the fertility- of the soil and the density of the population. They found towns of 10,000, 20,000 and 40,000 people, and the banfca of the Congo one continuous settlement. iheCongo Free State is now declared to have a population of 30,000,000, ten times as much' as was; originally though I. The estimate of the population of Africa, which twenty years ago was 75,000,000, lias risen to 100,000,000, 1 then 200,000,000, and ia now 2o0,Q00;000, '

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900501.2.12

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume XII, Issue 2415, 1 May 1890

Word Count
796

Hampstead School. Ashburton Guardian, Volume XII, Issue 2415, 1 May 1890

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