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Mondeys and Their Prey.

The Avay in which m onkeys catch land crabs is described by a sportsman who made an expedition to the jungles around Singapore, and there enjoyed sport which makes the contemporaneous records of Indian experiences pale into insignificance. The monkey lies down flat on its stomach, feigning death. From the countless passages piercing the mud in every direction, thousands of little red Aud yelloAV crabs soon make their appeari ance, and after suspiciously eyeing for a | few minutes the brown, fur of the monkey they slowly and cautiously sidle up to him, in great glee at the prospect of a big feed off the bones of Master Jacko. The latter peeps through his Jialf-closed eyelids, and fixes upon the biggest of the assembled' multitude. When the crab comes within reach, out dashes the monkey's arm, and off lie scampers into the impale with a cry ,of delight to discuss at leisure his cleverly earned dinner. ' Rarely did the monkeys seem to miss their prey,' adds "the describer of this scene. ' I saw, however, one old felloAV do so, and it Avas ludicrous in the extreme to see the rage it put him in. Jumping for fully a minute np and down on all fours at the mouth of the hole into which the crab had escaped, he positively howled Avith vexation. Then he set to 'work poking the mud about Avith his fingers at the entrance to the passage fruitlessly trying every now and again to keep into it.' These same monkeys, the so-called pig-tail variety, are taught by the Malays to pick fruit for them in the forests. The monkeys select the ripest fruit, and their masters, by following their movements, catch them in a cloth before they reach the ground. The monkey is too well trained'^ to attempt to eat any fruit while at Avork, but when sufli--1 cient are gathered he is dully rewarded I for his self-denial.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900421.2.9

Bibliographic details

Mondeys and Their Prey., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2406, 21 April 1890

Word Count
325

Mondeys and Their Prey. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2406, 21 April 1890

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