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A Sydney contemporary speaking of the payment of members in New South Wales, points out that such payment is not at all a certain guarantee that poor men will be enabled to get into Parliament. It cites several instances of honorable members subscribing their salary to local institutions. Our contemporary says:—"Constituencies will soon learn that a rich member means £300 per annum for hospital, agricultural show, school of arts, or what not. A poor member means the loss of this sum. Can anyone knowing human nature doubt that, excepting exceptions, constituencies will exclusively favor the man who can spare his Parliamentary stipend, and as steadily reject the man to whom it is necessary ? "

Ho&loway's Ointment and Pills.— Outward infirmities.—Before the discovery of these remedies, many,cases of sores, ulcers, etc., were pronounced to be hopelessly incurable, because the treatment pursued tended to destroy the strength ib was incompetent to preserve, and to exasperate the symptoms it was inadequate to remove. Holloway's Pills exert the most wholesome powers over the unhealthy flesh or skin, without debarring the patient from fresh air and exercise, and thus the constitutional vigour is husbanded while the most malignant ulcers, abscesses, and skin diseases are in process of cure. Both Ointment and Pills make the blood richer and purer, instead of permitting it to fall into that poor and watery state so fatal to many labouring under chronic ulcerations.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900407.2.25

Bibliographic details

Ashburton Guardian, Ashburton Guardian, Volume xii, Issue 2394, 7 April 1890

Word Count
232

Ashburton Guardian Ashburton Guardian, Volume xii, Issue 2394, 7 April 1890

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