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Melbourne Notes.

• [from our own correspondent.] - If Mr Reuben Keirl, ex-clergyman, exspeculator, ex-betting man, ex-racehorse owner, ex-newspaper proprietor, ex- j Secretary to a company in embryo, had \ inherited the £250,000 that the " Jubilee Plunger" had, and wastedj he would probably have emulated that gentleman's performances. As it is, he has made a small capital and a large amount of assur^ ance go a long way towards building up for himself a name on the shady side of Victorian society. The latest disclosure in connection with his financial legerdemain is a little affair in which he contrived to extract a cheque for £350 from Mr Leeper, Warden of Trinity College, and then diverted the valuable slip of paper to his own use. A very knowing customer was Mr Reuben Keirl, A Mrs Blewitt, whose name lias by this time gone pretty well through the colonies as that of a person whose husband disappeared about a, month ago, appears to be very anxious to prove herself a widow. Two dead men have been fished out of the water, and she has. successively claimed both of the bodies as being that of her husband. About the first one there is now no doubt whatever, and the matter is not by any, ma.ms cci'tajn with regard to Ihv SA^nnrl. lV.ir wlw'fiinil f'il'iwdf fluiiloiid m»\n

A Mrs Blewitt, whose name has by this time gone pretty well through the colonies as that of a person whose husband disappeared, about a, month ago, appears to be very anxious to prove herself a widow. Two dead men have been fished out of the water, and she has. successively claimed both of the bodies as being that of her husband. About the first one there is now no doubt whatever, and the matter is not by any, m^.ms cci-rajn with regard to Ihv second, llur whether oil ?icr<if rhcidciul men was Blewitt of not, the man's life whk assured for £350, and the office will require convincing proof of death before the policy is paid. The actual lo^a In Melbourne through fires cannot he accurately stated, because many people do not insure to full value. But one can approximate from what really is known. Thus, the ten bjg fires, of the last year—Harper's mill, Bijou Theatre, Moran & Oato, Kerr $ Co., George &George, oil stores, Levy Bros.^ late'fire in'Qugen street,"' skfttjng rfaii N^tlian's warehftuserr:aggr(sgate more than a quarter of a. million sterling. Besides these there are several others, including Robb's Buildings, not taken into account,, which- would probably add a,nftthe» £100,000 to the sum total for Melbourne, alone.

Unspecting country cousijns often cpm,e; into Melbourne for the purpose of- enjoying themselves. They fajl into the, haiiSq of two ojj thr-ae. good fellows,, $nd they have a few ■ * drinks " together. After treating goes on for a time a little harmless amusement is proposed—say, " tossing " for drinks, which leads up to " tossing " for hjilf growns. Or, perhaps, a th^ow 1" or two with dice varies, the pastime. Any way, tfiejr purses are lighter. To all such, as well as to, those whose turn has not yet come, the following bit of information may be interesting. A constable has discovered a "plant" of gambling tools behind fin. hptej at Wind/, !sor. "The " tools " consist of seven dice boxes and 213 loaded dice. A very respectable stock in trade, surely. There were also a half-crown, florin, a shilling, | two sixpenny, ancl two threepenny pieces. Each of the coins showed eitjier two Queen's heads, or two reverses. People who are in the habit of "tossing" will understand how convenient such coins would be in the hands of an experienced swindler, who instead of "calh ing " to you, waits until your falls, an 4 quietly uncovers his 'own. This is the true story of '' heads I win, tails you lose." Shareholders in a, pubj|c company musjt be hard to please if tliey are not satisfied with such a pleasant story as the chairman of the M'Culloch Carrying Company Limited had to tell the proprietary at j&Jieir sixth half-yearly meeting, held last week. In three years theiu profit have pxceeded their capital,' leaving "a trifle more than £l§oo to spare ; and the dividends pajd amount to §0 per cent upon the invested capital. Besides this, they have laid past a reserve fund of £10,000. They now declare, a dividend and bonus at the rate oi. 20 per cent as iisuaj. Thes.e figures disclose njit qn|y. a prosperous business, but a riipst excellent management, and Mr James, M'Culloch (the chairman) has good grounds for congratulating the shareholders upon t;he xcfingageinent (>f their manager, Mv Brown, for a further term of Ihrce years. They were also thinking of extending their operations by'opening new branches, and if that wove done, more capital would be required. The shareholders left that Oiwting tetter. fsti#frti with, thw iUY^ 1

ment than many other investors who have ttended meetings during the past two or liree weeks. The annual meeting 1 of the Citizens' Life Assurance Company, held recently, disclosed an equally satisfactory state of affairs, though in a different direction. As its name indicates, it would appear to bo an office that appeals moro especially to working people, and, therefore, to the class amongst whom it is essential to encourage thrifty habits, and its published returns bear testimony to the power of .^^ pence. During the last three yearsinej^ company had issued more than 100;000 XT policies, and when it is stated that 57,325 of these policies were issued^dii****^ the year just closed we have an indication of a very satisfactory character. The actual revenue of the year has exceeded- \ % £1000 per week, whilst the average' ** weekly payment upon each policy, was only 4M. It is impossible to over-esti-mate the amount of good which this and "^ kindred societies are doing amongst us,vJL and the benefits they daily confer upon' $«- those most in need of such help dahnot';^ be too widely known. Melbourne, March 2oth. " C riy''^%.

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18900402.2.19

Bibliographic details

Melbourne Notes., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2391, 2 April 1890

Word Count
992

Melbourne Notes. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2391, 2 April 1890

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