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DISASTROUS HURRICANE.

3She visitors who drove fram Ashburton to the Anniversary at Newlands on Monday had a most unpleasant experienca oa their way home. Just before starting a strong nor- wester began to blow, and they were eoon in a terrific storm of sand and dust. The occupants of two of the trap9 were glad to lake shelter under a high fencj, as it was next to irapo sible to proceed, not only on account of the wind and dust, but also on account of tb.9 darkness which for a little ;ime was most intense, so that ...neither fences nor track could be seen The horse ridden by Lieut. Renshaw(-alvatioa Army) raatcd and fell, rolling over him and then bolted. By 10.45 the f sjsorm abated, and a litt'e we'eome rain fell, and the partv all arrived at Ashburton safely just before midnight. In addition to the instances of damage caused by Monday evening's gale, which ware mentioned Id yesterday's Issue, many others are coming to band. Quite a number of chimneys were blown down in tbe town and country, and sheds and outbouses appear to have been stripped lu all directions. The railway shed at lOhertsey was considerably damaged, and ' Messrs Frfedlander Bros*, grain store at Lyndhnrnt /.-as a good deal Injured about the roof. Some buildings at Methven were stripped and a man who reoeived a nasty oat in the faoa caußsd by a blow from a board firing through the air, came to town yesterday for medical assistance* Oar Aiford Forest correspondent writes: It is many years since suoh a heavy gale was experienced as that of Monday evenIng. Ic began about; seven o'clock and Increased until eleven, when rain began to fall and the lull waa most acceptable. Mr Henry Bites, one of the new settlers, had the whole of his roof, Including rafters, stripped completely, and Mrs Bites, who is ah Invalid, was greatly alarmed, the children being In bed at the time. Mf W. T. Chapman's eon when starting on horseback to seek the husband, who was away at the time, was blown over with the horse, narrowly escaping Injury; In faot the shingle mixing with the heavy clouds of dost rendered travelling almost an Impossibility. Me M. Fran's roof was Injured, about a yard being blown off. Many who had jaat sown their oats will be heavy loneca by the storm, the soil being stripped by the violence of the wind. At Springburn the engine shed was blown away and demolished. Bash fires raged threateningly, but the heavy down-poor of rain prevented their spreading. Gates, fences and housetops will require complete overhauling, us will wetar .races, which have received a lot of rubbish. Several stacks of straw were carried right away. A Dtrfield correspondent relates an amusing incident w'lloh oaourred on Monday night. An old lady had a hen sitting In a batb." The wind took both bath and hen for some two miles below the lady's house, where .they parted company. The bath was found the next d»y, and the hen has been heird of In the neighborhood of Kfrwee, more than five miles sway. Ohristohuboh, September 10 A heavy north-west gale blew here for a few hours last night, and reports are coming to hand of considerable damage In country districts. In North Canterbury the gale appears to have been partfonlaly hatvy. At Amberley the Ohuroh of the Holy Innooents was com* pletely wreefcod, tbe tower alone bblng left standing. At Xalapol the roof of the drying room of the woollen factory was partly smashed, and work was suspended this morolng. In Rsnglora and the ear* rounding dlattiot the wind for an hour blew with hurricane foroo. Lirgo quantities of flix at Oh'nnery's mills were blown •way. The wool shed at Chapman's, Sprlogbank, was unroofed, and the roof c?amped up like paper. One or two buildings, waiting rooms, etc., on the railway line were lifted off the foundations, and that at Oast was wrecked against the fence on tbe opposite side of the line. The Weßlayan church at Safton was displaced from the piles, acd the Star and Garter Hotel, Waikarl, was partly unroofed, M*ny chimneys have been blown down in the same district, and, aa a matter of course, the telegraph lines are interrupted. A large amount of trifling damage waa done to private houses in Lyttelton, but the severoßt loss was to No 8 of the big sheds on the Gladstone pier. A large. p : eo9 of the roof was ripped off the rafters, and the beams snapped like carrots, and the ehed generally Is much strained,

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DISASTROUS HURRICANE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2223, 11 September 1889

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