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THE DOCK LABORERS STRIKE.

(PER PBESS ASSOCIATION.)

London, August 26 Sixty thousand men are now oa strike. In consequence of the stoppage of woik several Australian steamers are now unloading at Plymouth. Thousands of artisans of various trades are joining the movement as a mark of sympathy. The public sympathise with the strikers ( m many of their demands, and suggestions are made for arbitration. The [ Kaikoura and Fif Bsbire have been unable to unload, and it is feared that unless the strike soon terminates they will be unable to keep the refrigerating machinery at work. Any new hands taken on are threatened by the strikers. There are 250 steamers m the port of London waiting to load. Two steamers of the Anglo- Australian Steam Navigation Company have been unable to coal. London, August 27. The dock strike paralyses business. The public is largely contributing to the strikers' support, but their misery is becoming acute. Although the strikers are generally ] orderly, a force of cavalry and artillery I is kept m readiness less an attaok should j be made on the docks, j Lumpers, porters, and carmen are striking at the coal hulks for double wages. Fruit and meat are rotting m tons. The clerks of the Orient Companp are assisting to load the Liguria. The P. and C). Company are unloading some ef their vessels at Southampton. One of the immediate consequences of the strike is that the shipping trade of London is being diverted to Antwerp, Hamburg, and North British ports. The regular Dock men only number 3000, The remainder of the men on I strike are river side workmen, and they are said to number 80,000. The Committee has forbidden irregular strikes.

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THE DOCK LABORERS STRIKE. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2211, 28 August 1889

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