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LOST: A MORSE

m — The publlo at large are warned against receiving or harboring a bay horse now wandering m the suburbs of Wellington. This warning is not given with a view to preventing people taking possession of and making me of the animal— anyone who takes a fancy to him on the strength of his appearance can have him — but as an intimation to all whom it may concern that the aforesaid horse ii an e?il disposed and malicious beast Incapable of honest work, and who preys upon the vitals of Bioiety by exacting sustenance and thonghtf al care under false pretenoen. Hli name Is Beelzebub. The olroumstanoes under whloh Bee'z?bub passed th« first thirty or forty years of his exfs'enoe •re not known, but we will take up bis history, at a point wfaen, some months ago, he passed Into the proud possession of a olerk m a large tanking holiness. This young gentleman, havfog * weakness for horseflesh, fed Bea'zebub luxuriously for a few weeks, with a view to improve his personal appearance by filling op the obvious gaps between bis ribs redaol g the «'za of his knees and extendtog bis' skin whioh had beoome so tight that numerous pointed bones almoit Esnetrated it. One day it ooourred to Im to take a ride, and the horse was brought forth and (quipped generally. Beefs^bnb's constitution, however, was nnrqoal to exerohe. and once In +he street be quietly but effectively fall to the groaud In a heap of which his owoer f'trmed pa>-t. Subsequent trials confirmed Bee ; iebub'a weakness of character and constitution, and br< ught opon his owner ; |he derisive jee r a of various ribald ft ends. It was then thought that a spell to the country would do Beeliebub good, and a short sojourn m the oraclng air of Wadestown w&s considered likely to restore his eelf-eonfideoee. He was accordingly entrusted to the oare of a resident of that locality, who is something of an artist. It occurred to this gentleman that he would vide B»e!zsbub up the hill, and he moan ted him. Simultaneously Beelzjbob laid down In the road. Nothing despairing, his oustodlan mounted again, wltb the aame resnlt, slightly aggravated to detail. When Beelzebub had revived blmcalf by leaning against tbe fence for m few minutes, and when his temporary proprietor had reoovered oonsolousnesß, they proceeded up the hill at a gentle ptoe, and eventually arrived home, Beelssbub. being plaoed m the stable, pro* seeded to eat suoh food as was wl: hln reach, •ad msde short work of an extra large feed of oats. He does not appear to have •lept daring the night, for by next mornlog be had eaten his straw bed, and was 4lsoovered In tbe sot of mastloatlng his halter. Next evening bis bed was made was Its aw taken from beer boxes, shavings and chips, sweepings, rags, etc., all of whioh he absorbed into bis system during tbe night. The beet straw having got Into tils head, Beelzabub made his way Into tbe home and began to eat the family. He w>s beaten off with a broomstick, and thereupon relifsd Into the fljwer garden and enjoyed htm£slf by eating the plants and parts of the feezes, After many startling adventnres of this kind, the ingenious idea of rt filing Beela-bub oeoured to his owner, and be was rsflflad accordingly as a staunch hack. An dQ< fortunate person In tbe insurance business won Beelzebub, and surreptitiously fed him, regardless of expe&se, on oats belonging to his employers for a week. Although still poßsetsed of a remarkably good appetite, the horse was quite unequal to work, and so bis lateat owner made an agreement to sell him for ten ■hillings on a certain day. On the evening of that day Bse'sebob esosped, taking with feUs tfTfflJ T»lO*ble doonojinti «nd « . -.- . . s

small feed box, whloh be 1b napp^a* d to have eaten. He wai hat seen In tbo ( vicinity of W-tdestowo eating the fences »od the trankt of blaegum trees. No rowird is offered for bis apprehension, bat any parson brloglng hla hetd, mlnns the rest of him, to toy of his owners will reoolve t eir warmest thanks.— •" New Zealand Ttmen."

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LOST: A MORSE Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2172, 13 July 1889

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