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THE FLOODS IN AMERICA

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Nbw York, Jane 8. It is conjectured by some that 25000 persons were drowned by the Hood at Johnstown, and that 8000 perished m burning debris.

Communication with Johnstown has been restored. * The distress from the flood is appalling m Conemaugh Valley, farms, mills, hamlets and towns being a vast scene of desolation. Thousands of people have been swept away. The Cambria ironworks at Johnstown) at which 000 men were employed, have been 'completely destroyed. ' •ySe sqddenness vr\lh which the disaster overtook^ the resident's, was something terrible. A waterspout broke the darn of the reseryoir on Friday afternoon, and a toriept of water 40ft deep sf rtycjc Johngtowp within l|alf-an-jipiir ? s|jt)- --■ tnergipg the tpwp. Only two rooft 1 remained above water.

[This eataitrophe recalls a simlllar dln&iter whltb occurred nerr ShefSeld, Eogland. on Marob 11th, 1864, wbon a new embankment oonatruo ed for the Sheffield Wate? fiompftny, at graifield, Brokl do/p, and let out a body of water Off feet doep from a reaervoir 78 sorea la extent, The destruction of life and property by this flood was unprecedented m England Bhtffiald and thp country fc'r 14 miles i around Wo re ' Inundated, and mills, | hoirttw, and hamlets swept away ; 250 UvM were Jo it'; and the damase 'to propei ty win' evt'matfd at £327,000. Nearly £53,000 w» «nbiori^4 vlt^k I The Amerlogq e»t»itrophe was raatly mor« diitreaslDg and destraolive.' The reiervolr was ao enormous one — three milas long, and a mile and a half m 1 width.] (Reoej7ed Jane 4. 1.^4 p.m.) ' v - ' »»^ Yosi. June 8. The residents oTjohpstowQ were WKnt4o|tb« dwger impending from

c bursting of tbe reservoir and were urged to tpke refuge on the high lands . m the vicinity. The warning, however, was unheeded ard while the people were laughing at the predicted danger tbe rushing torrent overwhelmed the town. Hundreds of houses topped I from their foundations and floated 5 away m the flood being dashed together > by the violence of the water till they 5 1 were destroyed, the inmates loudly shrieking for belp the while. Fears had been felt for the security of the reservoir for over a year. The damage to property occasioned by : the catastrophe is estimated at i 25,000,000 dollars. Southwork, Conemaugb, Woodvale, Cambria City, Morrelville and Sheridan have been destroyed, scarcely a building standing. The ' residents have mostly been drownod. For twelve miles round Johnstown every town and village, and all tbe railways, telegraph stations, mills and houses have been destroyed. Two thousand coffin* have been sent to Johnstown. The floods m the Conemaugh Valley are receding, and the weather is clearing. Every river draining the Allegheny mountains is a raging torrent. Many collieries are flooded. The railway bridges over the Potomac and at Harper's Ferry, were saved by loading them with engines. * The floods overflowed tbe Washington and .Richmond bridges. Energetic measures for the relief of the survivors from tbe Hood are being organised. Two trains on the Pennyslvania railway were swept away, and the passengers drowned. At Johnstown a large pile of debris crowded with refugees caught fire, and every minute a floating bouse was swept by the current on to the pile, when it was dashed into the fhmes and its inmates burned alive. The railway officials compute that fully 1500 people were roasted to death.

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THE FLOODS IN AMERICA Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2142, 4 June 1889

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