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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1889. A PROSPEROUS COLONY.

It is not often that t we hear very much about Cape Colony and the neighboring settlements of South Africa, latterly most of the news about the Dark Continent having related to affairs on the Congo, or Stanley's expeditions into the interior. Most people Indeed have m , notion that the settlements at the Cape are slow-going affaire, and bat little notice has been taken of the occasional telegrams which have found their way into print, indicative of a very different state of things. Bat those who have like Captain Cattle "when foand made a note of" these soraps of intelligence will not need "to be told that latterly affairs have been looking up very much down Cape way, and that the diamond mines, and more recently the great discoveries of gold in the Transvaal, have brought about in some parts of South Afrioa an almost unexampled prosperity. Here, however, is a more detailed account of the condition of the country from the pen of a quondam Auoklander now resident there, who, in the course of a long and interesting letter to the " New Zealand Herald," writes as follows : — " After the depression and complaining heard in the streets of Auckland, it is pleasant to be located, even for a short time, in a prosperous talony, as I find South Africa is. There are indications of it on every hand. Yes, even clerks and. telegraphists have been at a premium, and to my utter astonishment one of the first advertisements I saw on landing here was one for a number of ' bank clerks, wanted ! for town and country.'— Apply, etc. The vacancies will soon be filled up, for young men are coming out by the score every week, so pray don't let this disturb any of the tellers, ledger clerks, or accountants in your banks. Judging from a short study of the Customs and other returns, it is apparent that there has bean, ond is, a steady and marked improvement through the length and breadth of South Africa, and this has been going on for the last two or three years, at some times and in some districts by leaps and bounds, but each period of time clearly marking an advance on the past, both in commerce and industry, thus plainly indicating solid growth and permanent development. The diamond fields, from the first discovery, have been a frutiful source of enterprise, and one of the mainstays of the colony •t large. This industry was never in a more hopeful or prosperous condition than now. The production of gold is increasing enormously. Farm produce, wool, grain, feathers, and wine are commanding higher prices, enabling the farmer not only to make up leeway, but so increasing his spending powers that he materially adda to the general prosperity. But the great source of wealth, and the stimulus which has brought about the present prosperity, are the goldfields of the Transvaal, ot which Johannesburg is the centre of attraction. I must reserve to another letter some particulars of this remarkable town, which is unparalleled for size, wealth, and importance, considering it is a baby less than three years old. It bids fair to eolipse the Australian and Oalifornian goldfields, and many believe that vast as are the enterprises and successes of the past, they are but the beginning of a development that will yet astonish the world." This is very pleasant reading indeed, and the only pity is that we in New Zealand (albeit we are now in a fair way towards better things than we have known for some years past) have not as I bright prospects as the lucky people of I the Transvaal Maybe though oar turn M «onie yet, and metntime we have

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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. SATURDAY, JUNE 1, 1889. A PROSPEROUS COLONY. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2140, 1 June 1889

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