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RINKING.

TO THE fiDITOR. Sib,— l would feel obliged to you by your allowing me npaoe to express my opinion npon the benefits derived, both socially and morally, from having a Boiler Skating Rink in your town. My reason for asking this is that many perßonß, who have never been to a Boiler Skating Bink nor read the rules or regnlationa of one, are sometimes a little prejudioed and will apeak against it, thereby doing the Bink an injaetioo and stopping some from indulging in an exercise that would be, in regard to health, a benefit for life. I am a skater myself, and have been for many years, and have visited a great number of towns, and in every place where I have found a Bink the people declare it to be the best amusement to be found, the only persons who complain being the hotel keepers, in many of the amusements of to-day there is too much of the element of chance and a strong desire to win. People who really know better, do sometimes quarrel over a game of cards, oroquet, lawn tennis, dominoes, or some other game, while about the only element of chance there is in skating, as indulged in by the general public, is the ohanoe of falling, and very often there is quite enough of this element to make it interesting. Not only the young people, bnt the older ones— fathers and mothers— are learning and enjoying the splendid ezeroise which the invention of the roller skate has brought us. As for the ladies there is nothing so well adapted to the development and display of a fine figure aB roller skating, and in no way does a lady display auoh elegance and grace as when circling about on skates: The accomplishment is indeed becoming a j very important part of every young lady's education, for Bkating induces a graceful oarriage, while at the same time it expands the ohest, teaching self-relianoe in the effort to avoid collision, and trains the mind and eye to quiok aotion. It promotes physical health which is neoessary to mental health wad vite versa; Physical health is valuable to the brain worker, mental health is valuable to the manual worker ; health is positively essential to the highest degree of beauty to which a person is oapable of attaining, Health insures a clear rioh complexion, bright eyes, and an aotive mind with which to entertain and be entertained. Almost all the Binke of to-day are provided with all the modern I conveniences, and to show their advantages over skating on ice, it is only neoessary to call to mind the experiences of years ago, the frozen fingers and cold toes, no resting without batohing oold, the long walk to and from the lake, pond or river, the treacherous air-holes, dangerous snags, &0., and compare this with the Boiler Bink of th< present, with its eleotrio lights, mußio, and many oDnvenienoea, be it in the land of ice* looked lake or river, or under the genial Southern sun, where rivers and brooka run on through all seasons without knowing the winter's oold. We now skate free from the attendant disoomfort and oftentime fatal exposure oi tha old time ak&ting above mentioned. In conclusion 1 would iay that it should be the duty of ministers, school masters, and all publio men who have an influence over our young people to impress upon their minds that the secret of health is exeroise, which may and oan be obtained by roller skating. Wishing your Bink hsre every mooeiß, I am, etc.,

A VISITOB 7BOU WELLINaiON,

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RINKING. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2140, 1 June 1889

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