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STRANGE DISCOVERY OF A GOLDFIELD.

Queer things happen (a Africa, no doubt, but a large amocnt of faith la necessary to the acoeptanoe as exact history of m account given m the "Transvaal Advertiser" of the discovery of * new goldfield on the High Veldt. A well known resident m the Republio went out «o hunt one morning, and soon flighted a koodoo bull, which he tried to stalk. He ancoeeded m slightly woundiDg the aolmal, and then galloped after it m the open, While descending a rooky declivity bis horse stumbled , he waa thrown, and hta tiflj waa broken. On seeing what had happened, the koodoo turned round and at onoe attacked the pursuer, knooking him to the ground and trying to kneel upon him* Grasping the animal's forelegs tightly, the hunter succeeded In keeping the book In an ereot position. The horns of the antelope had evidently entered tbe bank to some depth, foi the hoe of the brute preised upon the ohest of the unfortunate man. Suddenly, however, the imprisoned hunter found that the buck was making strenuous efforts to extrloate its horns from tbe veldt, bat without avail, and he finally oame to the conclusion that they had been driven so firmly into the ground as to resist all the efforts of the animal to escape. He gradually tried to release the legs of the buck, and endeavored to reach his pockets, m the hops of getting at his knife, but m vain. In this manner buok and inun remained throughout the heat of a bro ling day, tha koodoo moan ing pitoously the wb.le The shades of night gave relief for a while ; but as the twilight deepened, the laugh of the hyena, and tbe yelp of the sarodvark showed the hunter that he had other dangers to fear. As night catna on these creatures, growing bolder owing to the silence of ttie group m the veldt, approaohtd nearer, and the captive man not only saw the fiery gleam of their eyes, but finajly had hiß coat sleeve grasped by oue of the assailants, while the bnck plunged as another attacked hid flmk The huntor gave vent to a o y to duve off the fierce ournivora, and by dint of shotting and waving his arms, assisted by tbe kicks of the buok, he managed to keep off the brutes lill daylight forced them to return to their holes. Tha dawn betokened another hot day, and both man and back were wellnigh worn out with the sleepless vigil of the preceding night. Shortly after daylight the ping of a bullet, fol owed immediately by a wound ovor his forehead and ihe aouud of the report or a rifia, warned thu hunter that danger was nigh, dying out tianucalJy, be »»ved his hand* | about, and suddenly bethinking liiineelt of I the lact, he drew from his \n otset a white haudkerchuf, and lot it flutter m the moriiiog breiza. ih;a had thb desired tffect, and the strauger-»n fcugliahman — appruaohi g waa coon informed of the plight his fellow man was m. All efforts to remove the horns of the buck, however, proved f ruiilesß ; and not wiohiog to deotroy so fLean animal, the fc-nglisbman, after giviug the ouptive man a drop of brandy from his fl*sk, and placing his saddle cloth under his head, roue off to tho nearest farm, some m"x miles distant, for aesistaoou. On returning wiih reins and spade, the legs of the buck were secured, and a rein placed ioucd the neok of the fcubdued and terrified animal After digging for some time ihe spade struck against some hard substance of a me tall) o nature; and further delving revealed the faot that tbe right horn wbb embedded m a oms of metal. More digging teleaaed both horns> euoh bearing a Similar appendage, whloh, after the hunter had been released, were finally treed from the horns by the uae of hatchets. The meta), to the astonishment of all those present, was soon seen to be gold, aad a further searoh led to the unearthing of amsller nuggets. The nuggets weighed Blb and Gib, avoirdupois. The farm, a private one, Is dlllgeatly being worked by several prospectors, and many nuggets have already been nn earthed, while panning and sinkings m the spruit have provided considerably more than " tucker."

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STRANGE DISCOVERY OF A GOLDFIELD. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2137, 17 May 1889

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