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The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. THURSDAY, MAY 9, 1889. LOCAL AND GENERAL

Twenty thousand Irish harvesters go .to England and Scotland every spring.

The Horse Shoe Hotel, m Tottenham Court road, London, was aold reoently for the enormous sum of £90,000.

The Royal Humane Society is the means of saving between 150 and 200 people from drowning every year.

There are, it soems, aohools for dunces m Germany, at whioh dull ohildren receive instruction suited to their oapaoity.

There are about 70,000 laoe- makers m Normandy, and altogether m Franoe there are nearly 200,000 women engaged m this industry.

It is said that a legaoy of £10,000 has been left to Mr Clement Scott, the dramatic oritio of the "Daily Telegraph," by an unknown lady admirer.

A sooiety journal informs a correspondent that " when a gentleman and lady are walking up the street, the lady should walk inside the gentleman."

The " Dunedin Evening Star " announoes that it "is m a position to state that the Govurnment have no intention of introducing an amending Eduoation Bill this aeeaion."

In the Banks m England the deposits of customers and the balanoes standing to the credit of current aooounts amount to the total of £600,000,000, and year after year n increases.

There are now m the United Kingdom 1350 workmen's retail Btores, with nearly one million members, and a oapital of £9,000,000, besides some millions on deposit. The sales laßt year to members were over £25,000,000, with £3,000,000 profits.

A correspondent of tne " Field " states that an oyßter was last week dredged off Lyttelton Heads the | measurements of whioh were— length, 7in : breadth, 7in ; oircumferenoo, 16in ; and 20£in round the outside edge ; weight, S^lbs.

Mr Jernold Knight, late o! Knight Bros., nurseryman, Sandhurst, claims that ho has discovered a simple method of destroying the codlin moth. He ties pieces of paper or cloth on the twigs, to which the grubs attach tKimeolvos and spin winter nests. He. "RtttnorßtlißSor"DOo"OOTiß~wlCßrthe fallenTeaves during June and July and burns them, thus destroying the pest.

Not teetotallers only, but the general publio will be glad to notice that Miss Ackerman, tho talented leoturess for the Women's Christian Temperanoe Union, is announoed to dolivor addresses at the Oddfellows' Hall on Saturday evening next at 7.30 o'clock, and on Sunday evening at 8 o'clock. The same lady also delivers an address, to women only, at ihe same plaoe on Saturday at S p.m. Miss Aokerman is possessed of great oratorioal powers, and her lectures are an intellectual treat of a high order.

Artists often sigh for the seorat of the rich lasting colours used by the anoients. A Fronoh chemist has been analysing tho famous Alexandrian blue on Eomc fragments of a mosaic from Pompeii, and he finds that the pigment was compost d of Band and oarbonato of ohalk enbjeoted to a very high temperature, and mixed with copper. He has exaotly reproduced the tint by this mixture. Alexandrian blue is the most 41 fixed " colour known, however, and was manufactured m the timo of tho Ptolemys, being introduced into Italy early m the Christian era.

Referring to tho misconduct of volunteers duriDg the Waikato encampment, the "Auckland Observer " says : — " Tho sorrowful eoonea at the oamp and elsewhere would not have ocourred had the offioera boon doing their duty- To oant on the men the full blame for what was the result of gross lack of discipline is therefore absolutely unjust." From whioh it would appear that we were fully justified m tho suspicion whioh wo expressed m a reoent artiole on the subjeot that laxity on tho part of the officers waß largely responsible for the derelictions on the part of the rank and i\\e.

Lady M r, a well-known figurp m the streets of Melbourne, is the sieter of a oharm? ing peeress, whose portrait may be seen m moat of the shop windows where bishops and professional beauties -gaze vaoantly at one another all day long. Lady M— — , herself the wreck of a onoe beautiful woman, rer oeives a quarterly remittance of £50 from England. Immediately Bbc gets the money she goes upon what the reporters of the Mel'uJ' 1 ' 08 evoning papers are wont to describe as " a bowhng tear." In other words, she becomes drunk, and makeß a disgraoeful exhibition 01 herself m tho streets.

The '• Press " says that it is understood that the- Registrar-Genera), having been advised that the grain cropa of Canterbury were under-estimated, owing to the returns being asked for before weather sot m whioh developed a larger yield of grain per aore, has asked the several enumerators if, after making duo enquiry they find the returns were not correot, to furnish him with information necessary to revise the statements furnished. To do this work oilootually it is suggested it would be best to take a fresh enumeration. Tho returns published by the Rogistar it is said aro bo far under tho mark with regard to North Canterbury as to be at present unreliable.

Tho Hon Franoiß Ormond, M.L.0., of Viotoria, whose death was announoed the other day was one of the greatest benefaotors of that colony. He was the founder of Ormond College, named after him, having given a grant to it of £38,883 out of the total oost up to last year of £44,898. He also founded a ohair of mueio m connection with the Melbourne University contributing no less a sum than £20,000. Through his instrumentality, and mainly owing to his liberality, a working men's college has boon established m Melbourno to improve tho general and teohnioal education of the working ol asses. Mr Ormond subscribed £5500 towards the building.

Early on the morning of tho 2<lth ultimo a boiler exploded on the premises of Messrs Pitt and 00., of North Melbourne, eeriously j injuring ona of the workmen, and killing the son of the proprietor, who had oharge of it. Ho was blown to pieces. The boiler had been purahiißod at second hand Home tirno ago. It was, howovor, inspected half a year sinoo by an expert, who thon oorlifiod tl;ut it waß m good oondition. Ho had' tested it with cqld water up to twioo Iho pressure at whioh it was requisite to work it. The cfiools of the explosion were suoh as to wreck tho building, and the cause cannot be accounted for. Young Pitt Waß a certified engineor, and tho owners of the faotory appear to have observed all the jprepautiona Ordinarily m U6fy

The one milo professional championship race takes plaoe at the Itink to-night.

On Sunday next the Rsv Father Obaatagnon will oelohrato Mass at Methven, and there will be Vospers at Ashburton at the usual hour.

During April the Charitable Aid Committee, Ohristohuroh, granted outdoor relief m 488 separate oases, being twonty more than m March, and twelve more than m April last year.

On Tuesday twenty-nino black, brown and whitey brown merino owes m a pen at the Bangiora Saleyards attracted a large amount of attention. Thoso wore part of a flock whioh Mr J. Fulton is forming with a yiow of ultimately producing a breed of entirely black- wooled merinos. This gentleman hriß been bo far successful that bosides the foregoing sheep he has sevoral quite blackwoolod sheep bred from rams and owes seleoted by him some timo ago.—" Press.")

A murder is reported to have been committee) aomo way off Wynaad, m whioh a monkoy delected the i murdorers. It appears that a juggler with his wife, a goat and two monkeys wore attaoked by two Moplnha, who killed all exoept the male monkoy (who esouped), and buriod the bodies m the jungle. The male monkey took its station upon a big tree, watohed everything, and wheu a conBlable passed by the animal made after him, laid hold ou the man's leg, and dragged him to the plaoo where the bodies were buried. The bodies wore exhumed, after which the monkey showed the way to a hut which the murderers had entered. Not finding thorn, the animal took the constable m another direction, and suddenly ran at full speed, 'and seized a Moplah, who was going to bathe near a tank, by the neok, and waited till the constable arrived. This led to the doteotion of the murderers, who have been brought to Caliout.— " Singapore Free Press."

The usual weekly meeting of the Star of the East Lodge, No. 62, 1.0.Q.T;, was held m the Templar Hall last evening. The Lodge was duly opened by Bro J. Edwardß, C.T., who oooupied the ohair. The minutes of the laet meeting were road and confirmed. It was resolved to wear the regalia on Saturday evening at Misa Aokerman's meeting. The reports of the officers showed that the Lodge is m a good position. The following offioors were then installed, viz. :— Bro O. Grant, 0,T. ; Bro W. Patterson, V.T. ; Bro J. Edwards, P.0.T. ; Sister Edwards, O. ; Bro Emsley, Seoretary; Sister Bennetts, Assistant Seoretary; Bro W.Huston, M. ; Sister Buck, D.M. ; Bro Hayman, J.G. ; Bro Trenworth, S.; Bro Scott, S.T.T. The installation was performed m an impressive manner by Bro T. Daltoc, L.D., who was assisted by Bros A. Oook, G.M., and S. Huston, G.D.M. Votes of thanks to the paßt officers and the installing officers were passed and responded to by the L.D., after whioh the Lodge was closed m the usual form by the O.T, Bro Grant.

The annual meeting of tho Mount Hutt Road Board oallod for Monday last and the annual meeting of ratepayers appointed for the same day were adjourned until June 13th m oonsequenoe of the aooounts not having been audited. Tbe ordinary monthly meeting of the Board then took place. Present — Messrs W. MoMillau (ohairman), J. Jaokson, J. Johnston, and £>. Cameron. The Clerk's report was read ; and it was resolved to call for tenders for repairs to outtinga to Rakaia Gorgo Bridge, and for reshingling about threequarters of a mile of the Ohertsey road. Correspondence was read from Mr 0. W. Purnell, oovering plans of lands required to be taken by the County Counoil for storm water purposes. Received. — From the Clerk Mount Somers Road Board covering oopy of a resolution required to be passed by this Board with reference to Bale of part of Road Board Reserve at Mount Somers. On the motion of the Ohairman, seoonded by Mr Johnston, a resolution m the terms required was pasßed. Aooounta to the amount of £8 6s 8i were passed for payment, and- the Board adjourned. ;

Apropos to the testimony, confession, and suioido of Figott, the following prophetic con* jeoture of Mra Oarlyle, wifo of Thomas Oarlyle, can be fonnd on page 230 of " Letters and Momerials of Jano Walsh Oarlyle," and written m her diary, April 27th, 1845. After desoribiug some other Irish visitors to hor ■miHtmna,'— tmtotfg — imam- ■ wagtrm-ißrnmitctr" patriot-poet Thomas Davis, she thus alludes to MrPigott:— " As for young Mr Pigott, I will here, m tho spirit of prophooy, inherited from my groat ancestor, John Welsh, the Covenantor, make a small prediction. If there be m his timo an insurrection m Ireland, as those gontlornen " — referring to hor husband's Irish visitors — " oonQdently anticipate Mr Pigott will rise to bo a Robespierre of some sort ; will cause many heads to be removed from the shoulders they belong to, and will eventually have his own head removed from his own shoulders. Nature has written on that handsome but fataMooking oountenanoe quite legibly to my prophetio eye, ' Go and get thyself beheaded, but not boforo having lent a hand towards the groat work of immortal smash. ' "

The " Minneapolis Tribune " thus writes of a girl preacher, Mary Somons, 10 years of ago, has delivered four Bormous m this place, and is beooming quite. popular as a preaoher. She has a good voioe and splendid delivery for one bo young. Mary is the daughter of a fairly well-to-do farmer who lives about four miles from this place. From infanoy she displayed unusual brightness. About eight months ago she joined the Baptist Cburoh here, and said that the Lord had oalled upon her to preach. She firsts addressed a small congregation at her father's house, and succeeded so well that she spoke next m a church near by. Tho little girl soon had a reputation throughout this and neighboring oountiee. Alter several months m tho oountry she preaohed here, and her Bucoeas was greater than it was m the rural distriots. Under her ministry several sinners joined tho ohuroh. Many allege that her sermons cannot be surpassed by any grown man or woman,,, Mary iB rather small for hor years, has sharp features, blaok eyes and hair, and is very intelligent. She will oontlnua hor aeryiqea rjero for several weeks, and, , then she wjll go tq tho larger Kohtuoky towns.' I

The final etone of the Centennial Hall, Sydney, was laid on the 11th inst. This hall, when completed, will be a building whioh for arohiteotural beauty of design, massivenees of etruoture, and size, will oompare favorably with any building m the Northern Hemisphere. The original estimated cost was £200,000, but, owing to alterations and improvements whioh have been introduced, it. has been considerably increased, and the whole cost will be very nearly £300,000, inoluding the organ, which bo the largest ever manufactured, and will cosi "^hout £16,000. The seven large girders for the support of the massive roof are 90ft long by Oft Bin id width, and are the largest m the world. One of the contraotore, op the oogasion of the laying of the top-stone, stated that the buildfng, when completed, would be ono of the largeßt town halls m tho world, being 180 ft long, 85ft wide, and 65ft high. The other largOßt halls m Britain and the ooloniea wore the Preston Town Hall, whioh was 147 ft x 95ft; tho Glaßgow Tublio Hall, 185 ft x 76ft; St George's Hall, Liverpool, 185 ft x 102 f t; and the Molbourne Town Hall, 147 ft x 72ft,

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. THURSDAY, MAY 9, 1889. LOCAL AND GENERAL, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2130, 9 May 1889

Word Count
2,333

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. THURSDAY, MAY 9, 1889. LOCAL AND GENERAL Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2130, 9 May 1889

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