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ASHBURTON COUNTY COUNCIL.

Following is the conclusion of our report of the proceedings at yesterday's meeting ; —

Mr Grigg sad that as far as he was on-, cerned he could not see sufficient reasoa for tho proposed change, but at present I they were unacquainted with the reasons which had influenced the Commissioners. Possibly they made the alteration so tbat a much greater length of railway than at present might be served. People at Gore would be able to catch the express at Dunedin and get to Ohriatchurch. In one day and persons living at Waipara could catch the express to Dunedin at Christ church. He had a strong suspicion, how- ! ever, that the main reason was that the Commissioners hoped to secure the steamer passengera, but that was a hope that would, he thought, be futile, beoause tbe steamers would probably be so timed that they would as frequently miss the train as at present. Although he agreed with Mr Harper he thought It would be better to wait a little time when they would be able to lay ovidence as to the effect of the new arrangement before the Commissioners,

Mr Wright did not agree with Mr Grigg as to the advisableness of taking no action at present. He was willing to give the Commissioners credit for the beet intentions, but probably their expectations would not be realised so far ne any lar«e increase m the through passenger traffic was concerned. That was represented by about half a dozen a day. It appeared to him that for the sake of acjommodat

ing a few tourists, who travelled at low rates the Commissioners were going to upset the whole of the train arrangements of Canterbury and Otago, to the detriment of the country districts. Mr Maxwell was" reported to have sail, m reply to a deputation which waited upon him m Christohuroh, that so long as the convenience of the mercantile community waß suited he was content He (Mr Wright) thought that the industrial olass who brought a large amount of traffio to the railway m the way of wool and grain were as muoh entitled to consideration as the mercantile olass.

Mr irleH lander : But the whole of the mercantile olass are not suited by the new arrangement. Mr Wright said that Mr Maxwell's reply was made to a member of the Chamber of Commerce, who said he

would be very well suited, In regard to answering correspondence by the new arrangement. He had spoken to a good many and he had failed to meet a single traveller by rail who was satisfied with the alterations He thought that it was due to themselves to point out tbe lnoonvenienoe that would lesult. He suggested tbat the Chairman aud some other member of the Council should be asked to prepare a resolution to be submitted for the Counoll's approval after the adjournment. Mr Friedlander said thit as far as the Borongh of Ashburton was oonoerned very great Inconvenience would be caused to business people. The proposed changes would only meet the convenience of a few leading houses m Ohristohurch as to correspondence. He did not see, hawever, why this should be taken Into aooount, as replies to important letters oould be sent by delayed telegrams, whioh were surely cheap enough. Tho Chairman said the alterations

would delay the correspondence of ninetenths of tbe oounty by honrs and days. He would be put back twenty-four hours, aud bis was not an exceptional case. On the motion of Mr Wright, seconded hy Mr F.iedlander, tbe Chairman and Mr Harper were authorised to draft a resolution whioh was submitted, after tbe luncheon adjournment, as follows : — " Tbat the Oonnoil respectfully urge the Hallway Commissioners to reconsider their proposal to start the south express at 11 n.m. from Christohuroh, inasmuch as such alteration will be most detrimental to communication north and south so far as this county is concerned. It also will delay the delivery of morning; mails along the railway, and as far as oan be seen is only to serve the very small number of through travellers, who do not deserve as muoh consideration as settlers m the various localities along the railway, the oarrlage of whose produoe furnishes the most profitable business of the railway." CHARITABLE AJD.

Tbe Chairman drew the attention of the Ojuqoll to an Injustice m the system of levying contributions by the Charitable Aid Board. Because some of the contributing bodies were dilatory m paying up the amounts due by them the Board made a total levy muoh m excess of Its requirements, so as to provide for the shortcomings of those bodies who were behind with their contributions, and who were thus encouraged te refrain from paying .their amounts when due. For the forthcoming year the Board intended making a levy sufficient for fourteen months, instead of on'y the twelve they were authorised by Aot to make, and he considered It wrong that the district should be oalled upon to find about £2000 m excess of requirements. Councillors seemed to think that the levy was illegal, as the Bqard bad no right to exsot contributions whioh tbey knew would be sufficient for fourteen months, while they were only empowered by law to levy for twelve.

No aotion was taken In the matter, It being understood that It ohould 'be, brought np again when' the Oonnoil was culled upon to pay Its contribution, Accounts were passed for payment. CLOSING OF A ROAD.

Tbe Committer which had been appointed to consider the closing of a road at Ealing, reported m favor of the proposal. , The report was Adopted,

The Irrigation Farm' Committee reported as follows ;— That having looked Into tbe accounts of the farm for the past year, and finding tbat the expenditure only exooeds the value of the produce m hand by about £30, whioh amount is more than counter-balanced by the present condition of the farm, the whole being laid down with clover and grasses, the Committee recommend the Council to oany pn the farm fo* another year, The Oommlttpe reoommed the Irrigation of the whole block of 60 aoros next season when the returns ehould amount to, as compared with this season, to 100 tons of hay, Ist orop ; 50 tons of ensilage second

uroy. Mr Harper gave particulars qf the results of the working of the farm during the past season. It had been Intended to take seed froai the seoond crop of clover, but the first orop having been out too late, the Beoond orop did not seed. The weather was wet and cold at the time, and It was hopeless attempting to m»ke hay. It was therefore determined to make an experiment with ensilage. A good stack had been put up, and the experiment , as far as could be seen would be very euooessfn'. He felt confident, if the farm were carried on, that In two years not only woqld the Initiative expendltlon be recouped, but they would have a profit In hand. Mr Wright asked for particulars as to the outlay on the farm. The Ohalrman stated that the expenditure was as follows :— For the year ending Maroh 1887, £4 16s 6d ; March 1888, £328 19a ; Maroh 1889, £231 4a 61. Totsl £565. This expenditure Included £60 for purohese of lease, and £30 for enlarging water raoa. The sum bf £42 193 had been realised by the sale bf produce, and the value on hand was estimated at £135. Mr Grigg seoonded the adoption of the report. He had been rather agreeably surprised that the farm had oome out so well dating tbe put penon, It wti now

m a conduct n when nolirge expenditure was neoeasary, aDd It would be a pity if It were abanJoued. He had always hold that Irrigation would be profitable as far as grazing was conoerned, but he had yet torbe convinced that it was equally beneficial fnr Rgr'ouUure.

Mr Wright waß n t going to object to the work being carried on for another year especially as Mr Grigg was of opinion there would be no loss next year on the transaction. If that was the case It was certainly desirable to have the farther Information a year's Irrigation would furnish. It was, however, just as well that the Cornell should boar In mind that it just was £500 out of pooket at the presnnt time oveo the farm. The sum of £590 had been Bpent, against whioh was £20 for a mower and £45 for produce. The estimate of prodnoe on hand, £135, was only an estimate ; he hoped it would be realised but he was rather doubtfnl.

The report was cdoptad. THE SMALL BIRDS NUISANCE. The Chairman Bald the time was approaching for the Oonnoil to oonslder whether it should make a grant for the purchase of poiaoned grain for the destruction of small birds.

Mr Brown said that he had paid great attention to the effect of poisoned wheat m deoteasiog the small bird pest and he was sorry to s<y that the means were not successful. A ne'ghbour of his had cooped up a hen for a fortnight and fed It on poisoned grain, on whioh it thrived very well. Athough he had systematically laid poisoned grain In his paddocks the number of dead birds found was bardly j worthy of notice. The experlenoe of his neighbours was the Bame, that the birds did not take tho graii laid for them. He looked on ttfe expenditure on poisoned grain as little short of waste of money He would move :— •" That In order to more effectually cope with the small bird nulaanoe this Council op till October 1 pay at tha rate of 4s 21 per hundred for the heads of full grown small birds destroyed within the County, excepting starlings and goldfinches, without any regard whatever to tbe means adopted for their destruction and that the distribution of poisoned grain be discontinued while th's motion Is m operation."

Mr oripg entirely agreed with Mr Brown . He had always had doubts of the effioaoy of poisoned grain and his doubts would have been greater, but for the fact that several settlers spoke highly of the destruction caused among the birds by poison. Eoh year m his own plantations the boys got upwards of 10,000 eggs. He thought tbe best way of dealing with the pest was by killing the old birds. If they gave 4< 2d, whion very likely would be supplemented by the Jfetoad Boards It would pay men to go out and catoh the birds. At all events the experiment might well be tried.

Mr Haiper thought if the proposal were carried the Council would have to levy the he i vie at rate they had ever levied yet. He could pay his expenses aod have something over besides every time he oame to Ashburton, at 4s 2d per 100 for birds, simply by picking up those tbat he poisoned. Tut re was not the slightest doubt i hat poison was most efficacious, but it had to be done systematically aod carefully, People must not be discouraged because they did not find many dead birds, because the birds as soon as they, fell were picked up by the hawks and go I Is. The effect of the poison oould be estima'ed by the annually lessening amount pad by the Boad Boards for eggs This year his Boad Board only paid £6 ; last year the amouot was £11. The boys m tbat district oomplained that it was hardly worth while, going round the hedges for eggs now, there were so few. The poison supplied by both firms m Ashburton last year was excellent aod was very destructive to the Bmall birds. As to what Mr Brown had said about feeding a hen on poisoned grain, he believed it was a physiologioal fact that it was impossible to poison a hen. Ducks and geese oould be poisoned, but not fowls. Mr Wright thought there was some truth m what Mr Harper had said about the difficulty of poisoning fowls. However, he was going to support Mr Brown's motion as he thought it a good departure. He had tried poisoned wheat and oats and his experience had been muoh on the lines of that of Mr Brown and Mr Grigg, that the poison had been a failure. Mr Harper was somewhat contradictory m his remarks. On the one hand he said tbat there were so few eggs to be got now that the boys did not think it worth while to look for them ; and on the other that the Council would have to pay the largest bill it ever had. For his part be would be glad If they had a big bill to pay because they would havo a substantial result. Mr Coster oould not support the motion. The experlenoe of hi; Board with poisoned grain had been so favorable tbat they had unanimously resolved to get A supply for tbls season. He heard last year of a water race, whioh ran close to a hedge, being completely blooked by tbe number of poisoned birds whioh fell

Into It. Mr Frledlander oould not agree with Mr Brown. He had made careful enquiries of farmers and found that the poisoned grain was very destructive. The saooharlne whioh was mixed with the poison removed the bitter taste whioh formerly repelled the bird.!.. The Chairman said there v?as no doubt that poisoned grain had been very effective. At the same time he was prepared to admit that there had been apparent failure In some Instances, whether owrng to the fault of the grain or the distribution he did not know. He was not disposed to quarrel with the present proposal bet they must be oareful what they were doing. If they offered 4 1 2 d It was possible soma persons might do a good trade by btinglng dead birds m from plage? outside tbe qouuty Mr Jaokson said poisoning had been very effioaolons.

A lengthy dlocuislon arose as to whether poisoned grain should be supplied by the Oonnoil If tho motion were carried. It was ultimately agreed to divide the motion and take the question of issuing poisoned grain afterwards. The first portion of the motion was then put to the mee^og. $he yotlqg was ?-=■ For the Chairman, Messrs Brown, Wright and Grigg; against, Messrs Harper, Frledlander, Coster and Jaokson. The Chairman gave his oastlm* Vote against the motion •« Bfl t 0 a fi ow oi .Urtuer consideration .

On the motion of Mr Qpster It was resolyed tfcat the sqm of &150 be granted for poisoned grain.

Mr Frledlander moved:— "That a Committee consisting of Messrs Wright, Harper, the Ohalrman and the mover be appointed to consider the best means of orrylug the above resolution into effect, and with power to aot." Mr Harper seoonded the motion whioh was carried. Qa the motion of Mr Brown It waj resolved that samples of tbe poisoned, grain purchased be submitted for analysis, UNREGISTERED DOO3. It was resolved to ask the polloe to prqoeed against the owners of unregistered doge, RATES. The Ohalrman was authorised to make arrangements for the oolleotion of outstanding rates.

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ASHBURTON COUNTY COUNCIL. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2126, 4 May 1889

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