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A PROSPEROUS VILLAGE SETTLER

J. Jessop, a "Village Settler" at Pahlatua, ln the north of Wellington Province, writes the Walrarapa "Star" an aooount of his doings, aod his opinion on the village settlement system. He i»yi ; — I am pleased to give you the return from my small farm this season. I have got everything stored exoept the tobacco and potatoes. I took 6 ions of hay < ff the plsoe, also \ ton of oats and hay and 3251bs of Timothy seed, Tbe seed was taken off two aoses. I have add 1891bs of this to Mr Birnte, storekeeper of Pahlatus, at 6d per lb. Mr Birnte says It li the grcn.e.t sample of seed ho Las seen m the dlstrlot. A hundred pound lour bag filled with the seed neighed 87«bs ao yon may judge of the quality, I shall "have soffic'ent potatoes fer try own use •ud seed for next season besides a ton for ■ale. I estimate I shall have a return of £39 9 j and have my seed to the good. The following is my calculation : — 6 tons hay at 80 , £24 ; 325 ibs Timothy seed 6 J per lb, £8 2* 6d ; £ ton of oats and hay £2 , 1 ton of potatoes £6 ; total £40 2--6 d. The above quotations are the market price prcourable m this district for the produce. Ido not wish It to be understood that this is all I have got. I have had my griz'mg as well ; at the present time 5 head of mlloh cows, one bull and a horse, and as soon as I get my brewery at work, you may expeot to hear from me In the way of perk and bacon, for whioh there Is a ready market. j

loan see plainly from what I bave produced this year off my little plaoe that the question : s settled as to the Village Settlement being a suooees, and I ohallenge any praot'oal person or even a novloe to deny the fact. To bit the nail squarely. I anert that m growing crops, the leading purpose Is to make a living. A scan must first make a living before he can make extra money. Henoe It ls a point of the utmost lmportanoa for farmers to grow their family supplies without having to buy them. The man who raises neatly everything needed for home consumption is independent, and with a variety of small crops be is absolutely protected against total fail are. Tbe farmer whose first object is to make a living on his small farm, works for himself and family, while the " all cotton " man works for speculators and gamblers, and they always beat blm. Banks may

fall, stocks may vanish into air, aod panics may bring desolation and ruin to the merchant, mechanic, and speculator, but the farmer who farms for a living is safe. He has no doubt, no mortgages to disturb his rest, his food li at home, his barns are his storehouse. The man who farms for a living works by the rule of good common sense ; the farmer who tries to make money before he makes a living, worka by the rule of some other kind of sense. A little more oommon sense mixed with ordinary Industry will make farmers the most prosperous and happy people m the oolony. Farmer, hava worked long enough for speculators and Shylooka; they ought to turn their attention to home, wife, children, and country. I trust my fellow oolonlsts will think this the right way to proosed, epeclally those In the Village Settlements, but It is rather premature to do anything In a large w*y, e_rMlaliy as their holdings are bush lauds maintain that m tbe oourse of three or fonr years we shall be able to be thoroughly Independent ; that we shall be self -supporting. J don't mean to say we shall be able to take a trip to Englrnd or Amerioa to do tbe grand.

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Permanent link to this item

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18890327.2.27

Bibliographic details

A PROSPEROUS VILLAGE SETTLER, Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2095, 27 March 1889

Word Count
660

A PROSPEROUS VILLAGE SETTLER Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2095, 27 March 1889

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