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The As hbur ton Gua rdi an. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1889. SIR WILLIAM JERVOIS.

Probably the most thoroughly popular Governor New Zealand has ever had is the pleasant, unassuming, gallant, and sensible gentleman, who is now on his way Home carrying /wijth him the pincere regrets, the hearty esteem, and the general goodwill arid good wishes of the colonists. Full of bonhommie and cheerful good nature, ready of sympathy, and thoroughly interested m the colony and all its concerns, the relations of his Excellency towards all classes were always of the most pleasant and cordial kind, while members of the Legislature are unanimous m testifying to the shrewd good sense and lively interest m affairs political of Her Majesty's representative. Ministers too heartily testify to Sir William's careful regard for constitutional privileges, and to his whole-souled endeavors to promote the weal of the colony over which he presided so long and so well. Never attempting to stretch the authority of Governor, he yet knew when to be firm, and won the esteem and respect of all his Advisers, to whom m his turn he often gave sound and valuable advice. - "Socially ;. too the regime pf Sir William and his amiable and popular lady was all .. that could be desired, and not m Wellington only, but m all the chief cities of" the colony which he has from time to time honored by a visit, the departure of Sir William and Lady Jervois is sincerely regretted. Lady Jervois was ever foremost m good works, and took an active interest m benevolent enterprises and movements for social amelioration and reform, and like the Governor himself will certainly be missed. Every part of tbe colony will therefore heartily sympathise with the tone of the farewell addresses which have been presented, and will be pleased to find that regret at parting is mutual, the tone of His Excellency's affectionate farewell admitting of no doubt of his sincere attachment to the colony the years ot his stay m which are m his own words described as "very very happy" ones. Sir William will, however, hot be altogether lost to New Zealand, though he lias ceased to reside within her bounds, and will doubtless do her good service at Home by speaking of her as she is, and removing many false and funavorable jmpressions. That he may be spared many yearg to do so — if not to return to the islands which like him and which he likes so well, will be the hearty wish of every colonist from the North Cape to the Bluff.

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Bibliographic details

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1889. SIR WILLIAM JERVOIS., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2094, 25 March 1889

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434

The Ashburton Guardian. Magna est Veritas et Prævalebit. MONDAY, MARCH 25, 1889. SIR WILLIAM JERVOIS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2094, 25 March 1889

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