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DISASTROUS STORMS.

A great wind and snowstorm prevailed on Feb. 3 on tbe English and Irish coasts. Several buildings m Queenstown were nnroofed by tbe gale, and the Ounard steamers Servia and Umbrla were set baok by it considerably. At Derby tbe barracks of the Salvation Army were blown down while a meeting was m progress, and the ruins took fire, and many persons were injured. At Bolton a schoolgirl waa killed by • detached stone. Atßardsley, Yorkshire the spire of tbe Congregational cburoh was blown down and crashed through the roof, hurting many persons. On the Continent the storm was equally severe; A heavy fair of snow ocourred m Berlin, and m the mountain districts of Germany thunderstorms were experienced, and continuous rainr fell. Subsequently the storm raged severely In the North Sea, and three Heligoland pilots were drowned. On Feb 8 and 9 heavy gales again prevailed on the English and Irish coasts. A boilding fell near Bolton and crushed a nnmber of cottages and killed six persons. At Pembroke the ferry boat capsfsed and nine persons were drowned. A barque was lost off -Grimsby, and all on board perished. The barque Glengrant was wrecked at Holyhead/ without lobb of life. The weatber was bitterly cold, and a number of small wrecks were reported m the British Channel. Telegraphic communication was Interrupted, and m various parti • number of houses were blown down , In Scotland a heavy snowstorm prevailed, an** the railways were blocked. MISCELLANEOUS. It was reported on January 27th that c plot had been discovered among the teachen fn the mosques, and other people of m fiuential position to depose the Sultan oi account of his private extravagance anc -aefllating policy. _ The •• Contemporary Review" with ai article criticising Biemaiok and the Empero William, supposed to have been written b; Dr. Mackenziehaß been forbidden m Germanj It is stated tbat Mr Gladstone's propose) Visit to tbe Pope wbb abandoned at the ci press wish of tbe Italian Government, and ii aeoordanofl with the earnest request c persons high m diplomatic droles m England itinee it was first announced that Mr Glad Stone would visit his Holiness, Signor Gris_ brought to bear all tba influence possible t cause the English statesman to change hi Kind. «_______________________. "Rough on Corns."— Ask for Well 1 " Rough on Corns Quick relief, co'mplei permanent cure. Corns, warts, bunions. A fU^Uwd«Xgi«ts 3

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http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/AG18890305.2.17

Bibliographic details

DISASTROUS STORMS., Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2079, 5 March 1889

Word Count
396

DISASTROUS STORMS. Ashburton Guardian, Volume VII, Issue 2079, 5 March 1889

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